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goafrit
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Re: Wasn't Infineon enough?
goafrit   8/14/2013 10:40:39 AM
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>>  If Strauss is right that this unit's mobile communications transceiver and design team is  probably the best standalone RF team in the world, perhaps Intel just wanted to grab the talent

I am not sure they are that good. Otherwise, they would have done so well that the company might not have to sell. This is an established firm and not a startup where the argument for acqui-hire could be made.

goafrit
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Re: Wasn't Infineon enough?
goafrit   8/14/2013 10:38:29 AM
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Intel wants to win in the mobile ecosystem just as they won in the desktop era. Never though Japanese iconic firm will be the pathway to execute that strategy. I think Intel has all the tools it needs to compete in this sector.

junko.yoshida
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Re: Wasn't Infineon enough?
junko.yoshida   8/14/2013 9:43:08 AM
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@amar, thanks for your comments. That's a really good insight -- complete with a good list of technologies and teams Intel shopped around in the last few years. 

I think you're right. Intel must be looking for its own set of transceivers. But that said, how big a leg up will Intel get by doing so, I wonder. 

IJD
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Re: Wasn't Infineon enough?
IJD   8/14/2013 6:21:25 AM
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@mcgrathdylan -- because having the best RF wireless modem in the world isn't going to sell unless as a minimum you've also got a competitive baseband DSP and the software stack to go with it, and preferably also a competitive application processor.

Motorola (and then Freescale) didn't have these, then Fujitsu didn't, now maybe Intel will ;-)

amar.ramteke2
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Re: Integration
amar.ramteke2   8/14/2013 5:21:33 AM
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It is a tough life for Intel Management. First, they failed to see the growth of smartphones and tablets. Then, they failed to make a decent power efficient processor for the non-desktop products. Intel is in the processor business, they want to sell more processors. Unfortunately, this isn't happening. No company will replace ARM processors with Intel's in their products. So, Intel has to do it on its own. Thats why this shopping spree, it better not be chaotic. Someone at Intel needs to efficiently manage the two verticals now, one is the high end LTE A chipset (Fujitsu + Motorola acquisition), and other one being the low end Comneon + others that work on gsm-umts-lte. There is still no Intel product with LTE in Market (Samsung's Galaxy tab 3 with Intel LTE may just be a prior committment to Intel or just to test waters for a non Qualcomm based modem).

Intel also needs to demonstrate a really good processor for smartphones, without faked benchmarks.

Intel should be very, very worried.

GeeKv2
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Integration
GeeKv2   8/14/2013 4:57:40 AM
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With so many acquisitions, how is Intel going to manage putting all the bits and pieces together? Its not a plug and play world. I am guessing they will now need some more engineers on the baseband side to interface with the new chips from Fujitsu. RF customisations take a hell lot of resources.

amar.ramteke2
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Re: Wasn't Infineon enough?
amar.ramteke2   8/14/2013 4:09:40 AM
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Intel had bought Infineon's division called Comneon about three years back. This division was primarily doing software for wireless modems (GSM and UMTS). Intel also bought a company in Egypt, and a company in Germany that was working on LTE.  This was together called Intel Mobile Communications. Intel acquired about 200 people from Motorola last year. My guess is, as Fujitsu Wireless lineage goes back to Motorola, someone from the newly acquired people suggested this purchase to speed up the product.

There is a standard called DigRF, which defines the interface between processors and transceivers. Intel could have been using Infineon's transceivers till now (Infineon still has this division with itself). Intel may be wanting to start using its own set of transceivers after this purchase.

LarryM99
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Re: Wasn't Infineon enough?
LarryM99   8/13/2013 6:56:57 PM
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The key point may be the x86 integration. Most ARM implementations these days integrate DSP coprocessor capability. Intel may be looking for something to tie together with an x86 core to compete more effectively in the mobile space.

junko.yoshida
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what's left at Fujitsu then?
junko.yoshida   8/13/2013 6:12:52 PM
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Now, that's interesting. Does this mean that Fujitsu Microelectroincs has pretty much given up on  becoming a provider of wireless chips for handset vendors?

mcgrathdylan
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Re: Wasn't Infineon enough?
mcgrathdylan   8/13/2013 1:15:17 PM
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PS- But that does beg the question: if this is probably the best standalone RF team in the world, why does this company keep changing hands so frequently?

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