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David Ashton
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Re:
David Ashton   8/14/2013 6:10:35 PM
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@Prabakhar...I don't think it's that simple, and I have no idea if there is more helium at airplane altitudes than at the surface, or whther it would concentrate even higher up.   The plane would obvoulsy have to have equipment that can (apart from gathering it) keep it cool. and it may not be economic (passengers might pay more, weight for weight...) but it would be interesting to know more about where the Helium actually is.   Anyone got the answers?

It's crazy that we use it in silly things like party balloons if it's that rare..  I'm sure hydrogen (mix it with CO2 or Nitrogen if necessary) would do.....

aarunaku
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Helium Shortage
aarunaku   8/14/2013 3:22:48 PM
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I worked in a low temperature physics laboratory and we used liquid He to in 25liter/8 gallon dewars in quotas per week. This was in the 90s and at time we were made very clear to recycle gaseous Helium to liquifying plant, which was attached to our facility.

There were times when we faced shortage of availability we felt that Helium should not be given to "MONKEYS" to fill balloons and decorate it for fun.

It is a great natural reserve, perhaps now the time has come to move the He(4,2) to the rare earth columns instead of the inert gas column of the periodic table for political reasons.

The worst thing that can happen is, companies lobbying to sell at high price to hospitals and other national facilities driving the costs up. It is still not too late to ban on the fun part and stick granting sales to licensed authorities with recycling facilities, however who would drive it is the question.

It may not sound very important to those who do not understand why losing He is very important, but one bad day will come where it is too late. May be next to Helium would be Hydrogen and water?

Duane Benson
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Privatize?
Duane Benson   8/14/2013 1:30:20 PM
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I thought I had read that the government wanted to privatize and sell off the reserve. Was that really a discussion a few years back or am I thinking of something else. If I recall correctly, the general consensus was that doing so would be a pretty bad idea.

DU00000001
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CEO
Re: Sounds like we need to develop nuclear fusion
DU00000001   8/14/2013 1:08:58 PM
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@all

I had already heard of problems with the helium supply chain. A fast investigation @ wikipedia revealed the true reason for the shortage:

It is not a problem of availability. It's just an issue of 'market'.
A downtransient in helium prices, accompanied by the availability of the US helium reserve resulted in an increase in helium usage (even where other gases had been used before). On the other hand the industrial gas suppliers partly lost interest in the production (better: extraction) of helium from natural gas (the 'standard' source for helium).

NOW we have increased consumption paired with lowered production. An example of free market economy. The solution could be simple: when helium prices are going up the producers will produce. It might take some time to build/reactivate the production facilities ... A cycle that is well-known from the semiconductor industry.

Phluph
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Re: Helium
Phluph   8/14/2013 1:05:20 PM
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The basic problems are that:

1) there is a very finite amount of He left on the planet. Some estimates put it at between 25 to 50 years supply. He is a byproduct of natural gas production but is present in usable amounts in only very very few parts of the world.

2) As mentioned the USA hold about 1/3 of the worlds supply.

3) Not sure if this recently changed but in the past ALL He recovered from gas production was required to go into the government 'Reserves' and was allocated to primary distributers (Airgas, etc.) from there.

4) Sale price of He from the stockpile has NEVER followed a realistic pricing vs availability model. In the past the prices were far below what 'the market' would dictate. The recent astronomical rise in price for He - our cost has gone up 150% in the last 2 years plus we and most users are now on a need/allocation basis - is because the price controls were somewhat lifted along with the amount being released for sale has been reduced..

5) Sadly there is no viable replacement for its myrid of uses. Even widespread fusion projects running for a year would hardly fill 1-day of He consumption.

Some high volume uses: Aluminum wleding, magnet cooling for medical scanners, anything needing an inert yet thermal conductive process atmosphere, backfilling cryo storage tanks, CO2 and several other gas lasers (He is a buffer gas par-excellance). For all of these and many many more simply put, nothing can take it's place without serious complications to be overcome.

rbanffy
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Re: Sounds like we need to develop nuclear fusion
rbanffy   8/14/2013 11:35:10 AM
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We already have the technology for that. What we don't have is breakeven industrial-scale fusion, where you extract more energy from the fusion reacion than you used to promote the fusion.

rick merritt
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Author
Re: Helium
rick merritt   8/14/2013 11:34:27 AM
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@Janine. You are right, there is a broader supply chian story to be told here. Can someone share the outlines of that story here?

I'm guessing Brian in his trade association role is just focused on making sure a door does not close in Washington, while others handle whatever is hapening in the supply chain.

JanineLove
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Re: Helium
JanineLove   8/14/2013 10:41:05 AM
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I think we need more information here... why do we need to tap into the "reserves" and why does the current deal expire on October 7th? WHy can't current suppliers fill the need? I know there are companies, such as Air Products & Chemicals, that sell industrial gases. Not understanding the issue clearly.

prabhakar_deosthali
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CEO
Re:
prabhakar_deosthali   8/14/2013 8:10:22 AM
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@David,

 

I like the idea of mining Helium from the higher up in the atmosphere by the airplanes.

Instead of returning with an empty fuel tank , they can come back with helium filled one. That can give abundant supply to all those silicon foundries

David Ashton
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Blogger
Helium
David Ashton   8/14/2013 5:44:20 AM
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I heard the sun has plenty.  Just send a tanker down there..... :-)

Seriously though, where does the Helium come from?  Is there not a small but retrieveable quantity in the atmosphere?   Or does it all head up to the top of the atmosphere?   Maybe there's a good sideline for airlines - mining helium from the higher atmosphere?  If it's so critical, should we be using it in party balloons?  Wouldn't Hydrogen be better for that? (yes, I know, some idiot would hold a match to a balloon sometime and sue someone....  :-)

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