Breaking News
Comments
Newest First | Oldest First | Threaded View
<<   <   Page 6 / 7   >   >>
jonpeddie
User Rank
Manager
Re: Sell thru of x86/Windows tablets
jonpeddie   8/24/2013 11:41:17 AM
NO RATINGS
There are no numbers so I don't know what you've seen. Intel will announce a new Bay Trail SoC at IDF in early Septmeber and release benchmark numbers then.

KB3001
User Rank
CEO
Re: Sell thru of x86/Windows tablets
KB3001   8/24/2013 11:30:25 AM
NO RATINGS
"It's the x86-based tablets, using Intel's new Atom-based SoC and AMD's APU that will allow us to do real work on a tablet. I agree, the Android tablets are imposible and don't have the app base for producity (Sure, you canget by and compromise by unlearning everything you did learn for the past ten years). X86 tablets will change the game and our usage modes"

 

What does this mean!? Where is the data that support these assertions? All the benchmarks that I have seen show Intel-based solutions for tablets well behind ARM-based ones. That includes performance and performance per battery life.

As for productivity, what are most people using their tablets for? circuit simulation? It's mostly used for email, web surfing, audio and video consumption. Surely there is no need for any "unlearning" here. And if you want PC applications on your tablet, surely the way is not to use processor technology designed for PCs. Yes, you might have the tools but you won't have much time to use them before the battery goes flat!

 

I am sorry but I have been reading/hearing the above assertions so many times lately and I can't for the life of me see any reason to believe them. Show us the numbers, please!

krisi
User Rank
CEO
ergonomics
krisi   8/24/2013 10:54:19 AM
NO RATINGS
The discussion here is mostly about computing power...for sure tablets are getting more powerful and can do what PCs could do few years ago...and PCs in turn in the past became as powerful as old workstations...but this is all semantics...transition from workstation to PCs was noticed by engineers, for the rest of the wold nothing has really changed, yes, price came down, vendors changed but computer remained a computer


The supposed shift from laptops to tablet transition is different...in addition to price, computation power, and vendor shift there is one dramatic difference: the tablet is small physically. Using it is not ergonomical. You can't see everything, you can't draw something precise quickly, you can't type very quickly and reliably, you can't work very efficiently for long period of times...your eyes and fingers are just suited that well to the tablet...this is fundamental reason it will not take over the laptop...for similar reasons Google eyeglasses or Apple iWatch will not take over from tablets...unless humans start growing larger eyes and smaller fingers, but that might take a while;-)

krisi
User Rank
CEO
Re: Where is the meat?
krisi   8/24/2013 10:45:43 AM
NO RATINGS
I agree with @KB...some numbers would be nice

jonpeddie
User Rank
Manager
Re: Sell thru of x86/Windows tablets
jonpeddie   8/24/2013 8:24:21 AM
It's the x86-based tablets, using Intel's new Atom-based SoC and AMD's APU that will allow us to do real work on a tablet. I agree, the Android tablets are imposible and don't have the app base for producity (Sure, you canget by and compromise by unlearning everything you did learn for the past ten years). X86 tablets will change the game and our usage modes

KB3001
User Rank
CEO
Where is the meat?
KB3001   8/24/2013 6:40:57 AM
NO RATINGS
I find this article full of assertions with no substance. It is about time we saw real solid numbers to have any confidence in Intel's claims. The latest AnTuTu mobile benchmark fiasco does not give me any confidence things are about to change.....

pixie1
User Rank
Rookie
Re: toy, not work
pixie1   8/23/2013 8:26:06 PM
NO RATINGS
" I assert 90% of engineers can't do any real work on tablets, "

 

That's true but what percentage of computing users in the world (smartphone-only users included) are engineers?

One aspect of the issue I did not see addressed in the comments so far is the use of VNC sessions. Sure, I use a laptop for design work but that same design work is performed on powerful machines in remote locations that I merely access screen sessions on. I don't see how a comparatively "wimpy" docked tablet or even phone couldn't do the same. I'm just using this thing to pass mouse and key inputs.

Bert22306
User Rank
CEO
Re: Return of the worksataion?
Bert22306   8/23/2013 7:06:19 PM
NO RATINGS
Junko, in terms of actual time spent on the PC, most of my "personal use computing" at home is probably watching Internet TV. For that, I'm in the den watching on a 42" HDTV set and separate audio system.

If I can dock a tablet to connect it to the HDTV set and the audio system, then it would make sense. Otherwise, why would I ever want to go to tablet for this?

I guess I'm saying, although tablets are getting more powerful, they're still small gadgets. In place of a book or magazine, sure. In place of home theater, uuh, not so good. There are uses of the home PC that a tablet, by itself, will remain unsuited for.

junko.yoshida
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Return of the worksataion?
junko.yoshida   8/23/2013 5:52:36 PM
NO RATINGS
Duane, workstation is a nice analogy. Obviously, tablets are getting powerful enough to do PCs' job, just as PCs got powerful enough to do workstations' job. The question, then, is as you pointed out, will "personal home use computing" become all tablets?

Duane Benson
User Rank
Blogger
Return of the worksataion?
Duane Benson   8/23/2013 5:16:54 PM
Back in the early days of personal computing, complex CAD and other applications requiring heavy lifting, used workstations. The term wasn't as generic back then as it is today. Essentially, they were just really powerful (for the day) small computers optimized for computational processing.

As PCs became more powerful, the performance gap decreased and the expense gap increased to the point where a "workstation" just became a more powerful PC.

Perhaps, that category will be returning. The gap between what many, many people need (those that can get by with a tablet) and what engineers and designers need has suddenly gotten quite large again.

My prediction is that the categories will fall out as such:

1) Personal home use computing and light corporate computing needs will be addressed by tablets and tablet/notebook hybrids.

2) Hard core gamers will have more traditional PC type systems with powerful CPUs and GPUs.

3) Engineers, and media producers will have more traditional PC type systems optimized similarly to game systems, but for commercial usage.

Category one is already at risk of replacement, even though it's not fully evolved. Not long from now it will be a person's phone wirelessly connected to dumb displays and input devices.

Categories 2 and 3 will likely keep the form factor for quite a while yet.

<<   <   Page 6 / 7   >   >>


EE Life
Frankenstein's Fix, Teardowns, Sideshows, Design Contests, Reader Content & More
Max Maxfield

What's the Best Traveling Toolkit?
Max Maxfield
12 comments
A few years ago at a family Christmas party, I won a pocket knife as part of a "Dirty Santa" game. This little scamp was a Buck 730 X-Tract. In addition to an incredibly strong and sharp ...

Rishabh N. Mahajani, High School Senior and Future Engineer

Future Engineers: Don’t 'Trip Up' on Your College Road Trip
Rishabh N. Mahajani, High School Senior and Future Engineer
9 comments
A future engineer shares his impressions of a recent tour of top schools and offers advice on making the most of the time-honored tradition of the college road trip.

Larry Desjardin

Engineers Should Study Finance: 5 Reasons Why
Larry Desjardin
41 comments
I'm a big proponent of engineers learning financial basics. Why? Because engineers are making decisions all the time, in multiple ways. Having a good financial understanding guides these ...

Karen Field

July Cartoon Caption Contest: Let's Talk Some Trash
Karen Field
159 comments
Steve Jobs allegedly got his start by dumpster diving with the Computer Club at Homestead High in the early 1970s.

Top Comments of the Week
Flash Poll
Like Us on Facebook
EE Times on Twitter
EE Times Twitter Feed

Datasheets.com Parts Search

185 million searchable parts
(please enter a part number or hit search to begin)