Design Con 2015
Breaking News
Comments
Oldest First | Newest First | Threaded View
rick merritt
User Rank
Author
Nirvana or just another?
rick merritt   8/30/2013 12:05:53 PM
NO RATINGS
Is this the nirvana of IoT or just another protocol in the sea?

KevinKrewell
User Rank
Rookie
Re: Nirvana or just another?
KevinKrewell   8/30/2013 12:34:34 PM
NO RATINGS
Hey Rick,

In the second paragraph there's a typo:  60 MHz -> 60GHz

The 60GHz band can be used for cable replacement for streaming video, but is limited to in-room transmission as it bounces off walls.

Kevin

 

JanineLove
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Nirvana or just another?
JanineLove   8/30/2013 1:29:27 PM
NO RATINGS
I'm wondering the same thing Rick. Seems like I'd just like the market to "get on with it" and let me link up my home networks....

"As many as a dozen 900 MHz protocols are now crowded into the space of building and home control networks."  It's going to need real marketing muscle to get this cleaned up.

Bert22306
User Rank
CEO
Not sure why this makes a difference
Bert22306   8/30/2013 4:29:52 PM
Not sure why this should make a difference to anyone but WiFi vendors, however. It's true that 802.11 can be applied to any number of roles other than that of "home PC network." Why not? Assuming you can make the electronics very small, cheap, and low power, it becomes a very flexible wireless LAN that could in principle accommodate snesors, refrigerators, toasters, and the light switches in your house.

It's more important to understand the Internet Protocol that has to ride on top of this, seems to me, than to focus on the link layer protocol.

ErrantOne
User Rank
Freelancer
Re: Nirvana or just another?
ErrantOne   8/30/2013 4:50:07 PM
NO RATINGS
I think the nirvana of IoT will have to be very cheap & easy to implement.  For now, this just reads like just another protocol in the sea.

glagnx
User Rank
Rookie
Nirvana or just another?
glagnx   8/31/2013 2:03:19 AM
NO RATINGS
Given that its only one engineer, its hard to tell whether its just a "me too" trying to find another band to put WiFi on, or whether there's a real need.

802.11/WiFi originated from the desire to give Ethernet mobility, hence WLAN. Using it on 900MHz only seems to go contrary to this given the fact that WLAN requires high throughput. Over the years, WiFi steadily went up in bandwidth from 22MHz to 40MHz, 80MHz and 160MHz. Going to smaller bandwidths will get customers less throughput and add to confusion. I realize that 802.11/WiFi has good marketing potential (whereas Zigbee isn't recognized by most consumers), but this will be confusing to consumers.

My company Argenox Technologies does 900MHz designs, and I can tell you that one of the main reasons we pick Sub-GHz designs is to avid WiFi congestion. Here comes 802.11/WiFi to grab more bandwidth and disturb other devices, just like it happened in 2.4GHz.

WiFi chipsets and modules such as TI's CC3000 are steadily gaining steam and although power consumption is an issue, they are easy to use. Unless I needed extreme low power or Mesh networking, I'd pick them over Zigbee to integrate IoT.

elctrnx_lyf
User Rank
Manager
Re: Nirvana or just another?
elctrnx_lyf   8/31/2013 9:47:12 AM
NO RATINGS
Looks like 900MHz band is becoming hugely crowded and the bandwidth is really scarce.

Sheetal.Pandey
User Rank
Manager
Re: Nirvana or just another?
Sheetal.Pandey   9/1/2013 11:37:57 PM
NO RATINGS
Wi-fi looks to progress more. Even if we look around the gadgets we use in home wi-fi hasa presence everywhere. Home automation is an area that has been in news from quite some time but has not made a revolutionary impact. May be the interface used and what are commonly supported in consumers home devices were quite different. But yes quite agree on the overloading the bandwidth part. Home automation can be made a reality in countries like america and many parts of europe but in countries like india where even the digital set top box for viewing tv channels are yet at their basic levels home automation will have to go a very long way.

markhahn0
User Rank
Rookie
Re: Nirvana or just another?
markhahn0   9/1/2013 11:42:55 PM
NO RATINGS
Sure, lower power is a good thing, and IoT clearly needs much lower BW.  But players in this field seem to be missing the big picture: people want to control and benefit from their Things.  What's missing is not so much layer 1, but layer 7 or so.

The current Things tend to just try to toss our data onto some vendor site, where we rely on the site to make the data worthwhile.  We don't really get to even see our own raw data, though sites often make some version of it available.  Why shouldn't the model be that our Things report to *our* storage, which we conditionally permit to also flow to vendor sites.  Or maybe third-party sites - after all, why would a Thing vendor necessarily have any particular skill at websites, or making data from one Thing meaningful to another vendor's Things...



Top Comments of the Week
Flash Poll
Like Us on Facebook

Datasheets.com Parts Search

185 million searchable parts
(please enter a part number or hit search to begin)
EE Life
Frankenstein's Fix, Teardowns, Sideshows, Design Contests, Reader Content & More
Carlos Bueno

Adventures in Userland
Carlos Bueno
Post a comment
Editor’s Note: Excerpted from Lauren Ipsum: A story about computer science and other improbable things, author Carlos Bueno introduces us to Lauren and her adventures in ...

Max Maxfield

Tired Old iPad 2 vs. Shiny New iPad Air 2
Max Maxfield
9 comments
I remember when the first iPad came out deep in the mists of time we used to call 2010. Actually, that's only four years ago, but it seems like a lifetime away -- I mean; can you remember ...

Martin Rowe

Make This Engineering Museum a Reality
Martin Rowe
Post a comment
Vincent Valentine is a man on a mission. He wants to make the first house to ever have a telephone into a telephone museum. Without help, it may not happen.

Rich Quinnell

Making the Grade in Industrial Design
Rich Quinnell
16 comments
As every developer knows, there are the paper specifications for a product design, and then there are the real requirements. The paper specs are dry, bland, and rigidly numeric, making ...

Special Video Section
The LT8640 is a 42V, 5A synchronous step-down regulator ...
The LTC2000 high-speed DAC has low noise and excellent ...
How do you protect the load and ensure output continues to ...
General-purpose DACs have applications in instrumentation, ...
Linear Technology demonstrates its latest measurement ...
10:29
Demos from Maxim Integrated at Electronica 2014 show ...
Bosch CEO Stefan Finkbeiner shows off latest combo and ...
STMicroelectronics demoed this simple gesture control ...
Keysight shows you what signals lurk in real-time at 510MHz ...
TE Connectivity's clear-plastic, full-size model car shows ...
Why culture makes Linear Tech a winner.
Recently formed Architects of Modern Power consortium ...
Specially modified Corvette C7 Stingray responds to ex Indy ...
Avago’s ACPL-K30T is the first solid-state driver qualified ...
NXP launches its line of multi-gate, multifunction, ...
Doug Bailey, VP of marketing at Power Integrations, gives a ...
See how to ease software bring-up with DesignWare IP ...
DesignWare IP Prototyping Kits enable fast software ...
This video explores the LT3086, a new member of our LDO+ ...
In today’s modern electronic systems, the need for power ...