Design Con 2015
Breaking News
Comments
junko.yoshida
User Rank
Blogger
Who gets there first?
junko.yoshida   9/9/2013 7:32:44 PM
NO RATINGS
In a race to realize the future of self-driving cars, the U.S., Japan and Europe are all looking at different scenarios -- as to when and how V2V and V2I will be implemented in which order.

My recent trip to Japan reveals that Japan, a nation always known for its eagerness to build the infrastructure first, is waking up to the emerging significance of "big data" collected via V2V. 

Bert22306
User Rank
CEO
Re: Who gets there first?
Bert22306   9/9/2013 8:50:39 PM
NO RATINGS
Seems to me that to support true self-driving cars, you will need both types of comms. So if budgetary constraints slow the introduction of vehicle to infrastructure, they'll also be slowing down the introduction of self driving cars.

As to natural disasters, they do tend to damage fixed infrastructure in a way that is more difficult to recover from. But I wouldn't conclude from this that therefore vehicle infrastructure communications aren't very important. For a self driving car, they're still indispensable.

I suppose you can concoct some weird and chaotic schemes, like all moving cars creating this gigantic ad-hoc network, where data from each car's local radar sensors become aggregated into a huge database of road conditions. Or the other way around, where the local infrastructure always intrudes into V2V comms, so there's never a need for that direct link. Aside from the greater complexity, it's not hard to show how either approach has its limits, if you expect self driving to become reality.

junko.yoshida
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Who gets there first?
junko.yoshida   9/9/2013 10:13:21 PM
NO RATINGS
That you need both -- V2V and V2I -- is the most logical answer. And yet, the reality is not exactly catching up with that logic.

junko.yoshida
User Rank
Blogger
Big shift
junko.yoshida   9/9/2013 10:19:28 PM
NO RATINGS
To me, the most surprising in talking to sources in Japan was what appears to be a big shift in the local industry's thinking. Details of their new ITS roadmap are expected to be discussed next month at ITS world Congress.

rick merritt
User Rank
Author
Global standard
rick merritt   9/10/2013 1:33:16 AM
NO RATINGS
Seems like we need to learn the lessons of cellular here and find a way to get to global standards for econonies of scale

junko.yoshida
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Global standard
junko.yoshida   9/12/2013 6:02:19 PM
NO RATINGS
I think a debate on how to integrate the recent proliferatinon of smartphones and growing LTE networks into a part of the V2X infrastructure is urgently needed.



Flash Poll
Top Comments of the Week
Like Us on Facebook
EE Times on Twitter
EE Times Twitter Feed

Datasheets.com Parts Search

185 million searchable parts
(please enter a part number or hit search to begin)
EE Life
Frankenstein's Fix, Teardowns, Sideshows, Design Contests, Reader Content & More
Max Maxfield

Want to Present a Paper at ESC Boston 2015?
Max Maxfield
8 comments
I tell you, I need more hours in each day. If I was having any more fun, there would have to be two of me to handle it all. For example, I just heard that I'm going to be both a speaker ...

Martin Rowe

No 2014 Punkin Chunkin, What Will You Do?
Martin Rowe
Post a comment
American Thanksgiving is next week, and while some people watch (American) football all day, the real competition on TV has become Punkin Chunkin. But there will be no Punkin Chunkin on TV ...

Rich Quinnell

Making the Grade in Industrial Design
Rich Quinnell
12 comments
As every developer knows, there are the paper specifications for a product design, and then there are the real requirements. The paper specs are dry, bland, and rigidly numeric, making ...

Martin Rowe

Book Review: Controlling Radiated Emissions by Design
Martin Rowe
1 Comment
Controlling Radiated Emissions by Design, Third Edition, by Michel Mardiguian. Contributions by Donald L. Sweeney and Roger Swanberg. List price: $89.99 (e-book), $119 (hardcover).