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LarryM99
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How does it compare to biology?
LarryM99   9/18/2013 7:47:02 PM
How do these chips compare to biology in terms of density and clock speed? I cringe every time I see traditional computers compared to the human brain in terms of capacity because their architecture is so different from our meat machines, but this seems to be one that is more directly comparable. Also, how much visibility do researchers have into the operation of the device? I can see this as a real tool for studying emergent intelligence.

_hm
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Re: How does it compare to biology?
_hm   9/18/2013 8:40:32 PM
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It will be wonderful if artifical sensing organs are developed for less fortunate handicap people. They will get new opportunities with enhanced senses. We study neural network for long. It looks, now time has come to see its application in real world.

 

Peter Clarke
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Re: How does it compare to biology?
Peter Clarke   9/19/2013 10:53:45 AM
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Colin Johnson covered this in more detail here

http://www.eetimes.com/document.asp?doc_id=1319173

 

 

Peter Clarke
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Re: How does it compare to biology?
Peter Clarke   9/19/2013 10:55:11 AM
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Colin Johnson covered this in more detail here

http://www.eetimes.com/document.asp?doc_id=1319173

 

 

rich.pell
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Re: How does it compare to biology?
rich.pell   9/20/2013 2:04:12 PM
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For a related article on IBM's research see:

The electronic brain gets closer

 

Mark Diehl
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Re: How does it compare to biology?
Mark Diehl   9/28/2013 7:50:00 AM
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Yes, this is a technical achievement, and may provide a model for studying parallel processing.  It is, however, unfortunate that the media presents technologies like this and the memristor is as a models of the human brain since these do not resemble the biological form in function, structure, or processing result.

rick merritt
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Ah the software
rick merritt   9/19/2013 11:04:27 AM
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The head of DARPA's microsystems group recently encouraged microprocessor engineers at Hot Chips to come up with new architectures to overcome the expected slowing in CMOS scaling, but he warned them:

"Don't come up with things no one can program. We've done that too many times before and it's getting embarassing!"



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