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junko.yoshida
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Re: Another consequence of Moore's Law de-factor demise
junko.yoshida   9/24/2013 12:37:21 PM
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@m00nshiine, thanks for your quick repsonse! That's good info. So, presumably, with the newly acquired litho products from TEL, Applied will have an edge over AMSL...

mohov0
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Re: Another consequence of Moore's Law de-factor demise
mohov0   9/24/2013 12:26:52 PM
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I totally agree. For these two giants to merge on an equal basis says tons about cooperative moves for the sake of keeping the momentum going in the chip and display industries.

m00nshine
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Re: Another consequence of Moore's Law de-factor demise
m00nshine   9/24/2013 12:25:34 PM
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TEL primary products are litho tracks, diffusion furnaces, and etch tools and also have a variety of wet cleans and CVD. They are the market leader in litho tracks. ASML doesn't really have a litho track product or cleans products but they basically have all the others excluding litho scanner.

junko.yoshida
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Re: Another consequence of Moore's Law de-factor demise
junko.yoshida   9/24/2013 12:08:35 PM
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Forgive me for my lack of knowledge, but what complementary products/technologies each company (Applied and Tokyo Electron) will bring to the table, I wonder...

AZskibum
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CEO
Re: Another consequence of Moore's Law de-factor demise
AZskibum   9/24/2013 10:54:22 AM
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It strikes me as an excellent move, and probably a necessary one. Either company alone would've faced much greater challenges leading the charge toward the limits of Moore's Law.

elctrnx_lyf
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Re: Another consequence of Moore's Law de-factor demise
elctrnx_lyf   9/24/2013 10:34:25 AM
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The consolidation could be a good news for the industry if the synergies these two companies could actually help to innovate with products.

gutiea1
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Another consequence of Moore's Law de-facto demise
gutiea1   9/24/2013 10:02:58 AM
Clearly, this is a move to cut costs, reduce redundancies and inefficiencies.  It is a good news for the shareholders and the industry and not so good for the employees; I imagine sales offices will be reduced, marketing trimmed and even R&D will be reorganized.  Another hint from a rapidy maturing industry with an unclear path for the future.

rgrutza600
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Rookie
WOW!
rgrutza600   9/24/2013 9:55:02 AM
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I just never imagined this having followed the industry for over 20 years now.  Amazing.  Wonder if it will be approved.

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