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junko.yoshida
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Re: automotive in what way?
junko.yoshida   10/3/2013 1:37:21 AM
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@tomc-eetimes, this just in from Broadcom.

Richard Barrett, Product Director, Wireless Connectivity, told us the following:

Broadcom's 5G WiFi for automotive is derived from the same mobility architectures that support smartphones and tablets. They are lower power by design relative to traditional access point architectures. The SDIO3 interface is used for mobility as it is lower power than current PCIe technologies used in traditional access point.

Let us know if he answered your question.

junko.yoshida
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Re: automotive in what way?
junko.yoshida   10/2/2013 3:25:46 PM
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Good question. I have contacted Broadcom to get the answer. Stay tuned.

tomc-eetimes
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automotive in what way?
tomc-eetimes   10/2/2013 3:10:21 PM
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Junko,

This part being targeted towards the automotive industry: does this suggest the power draw is somewhat lower than a standard Access Point kind of product? Do you know what digital interface the chip is supporting?

tc

rbv
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Re: doing it wrong
rbv   9/27/2013 3:01:25 PM
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@junko, I'm not talking about all those features being in the handset.

But the vehicle can be designed with a infotainment connection interface, so that the dealer can install brand-new electronics (also sourced from the car manufacturer, which is in the profit interest of both manufacturer and dealer) into an automobile that spent 5 years in the manufacturing and design phase.  Or have it installed at the factory, although that seems to needlessly reduce the dealer's opportunity to upsell the electronics.

What's important is to decouple electronic from mechanical design.  A six-year design leadtime for infotainment systems just is untenable.  Try to persist with that, and you WILL end up with all worthwhile features in the handset.

A side benefit is that consumers can bring old cars back to the dealer for an electronics upgrade.  Yes I realize that aftermarket upgrades represent a loss of profit for the manufacturer and dealer -- but the first manufacturer to deal with that not by integrating the system so much that it can't be upgraded, but provide their own upgrade path, is going to have a huge hit with consumers.

tektonikshift
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Re: Who's driving the automotive industry these days?
tektonikshift   9/27/2013 1:25:56 PM
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Junko,

You comment is spot on. 

Mobile is flywheel turning the (most) technology centric industries. The Car industry is adapting to this reality. 

The Television industry (broadcasters, content, TV makers) is struggling with the 'mobile' effect. Lets see if executives in Detroit, Munich, Nagoya will do better. 

-Tek

JanineLove
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Re: integration
JanineLove   9/27/2013 11:45:42 AM
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ANT is really strong in medical and sports related applications. People are much more familiar with BT in their automobiles. While I'd like to see ANT move into autos, I suspect it will be BT LE that dominates.

junko.yoshida
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Re: integration
junko.yoshida   9/27/2013 11:07:53 AM
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@Janine, one more thing. As a low-power wireless expert, how do you think that this will play out? Will ANT and Bluetooth LE duke it out -- in the automotive space?

junko.yoshida
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Re: integration
junko.yoshida   9/27/2013 11:05:32 AM
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@Janine, thanks for sharing the ANT-IN-PHONES url. That's very helpful.

junko.yoshida
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Re: Shifting into high gear
junko.yoshida   9/27/2013 10:32:52 AM
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@Rick, yes. Clearly, Broadcom hopes to leverage its first mover advantage in the Gigabit WiFi in the automotive market.

rick merritt
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Shifting into high gear
rick merritt   9/27/2013 2:16:30 AM
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Wow, some people could have 5 GHz WiFi in their cars before their homes, or at least at about the same time.

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