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jaybus0
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CEO
Re: why so closed?
jaybus0   9/28/2013 9:20:56 AM
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I disagree, Prabhakar. An infrastructure system would require involving numerous local governments, state/province governments, and national governments all working tofether. I believe the bureaucratic monster would ensure that we end with only half of an infrastructure and the side roads where many accidents happen would not be covered. I believe the divide and conquer method of deploying onboard systems at least ensures that it will be fully functional for some and eventually fully functional for everyone. The monumental task approach is more likely to half way work for everyone and be fully functional for no one.

 

KB3001
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CEO
What about Japan?
KB3001   9/28/2013 6:27:54 AM
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From my experience, the Japanese market has always been the most advanced in ADAS technology adoption. So what's the picture like in Japan? What are Japanese players e.g. Renesas doing in this area?

Kinnar
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CEO
ADAS is required feature but will be adding too much cost
Kinnar   9/28/2013 6:07:43 AM
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ADAS is really a very required feature but it will be adding too much amount in the basic value of the vehicle, it is rightly said that ADAS will being a mandatory thing as it had happened in case of ABS and Airbags, but in India ABS and Airbags are still optional features. Mainly the adding of more electronics will be adding more players in terms of technology solution provider, I hope Mitsubishi is the only automotive mfg that has its presence in electronics segment at well, what Mitsubishi will doing in term of developing ADAS?

Bert22306
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CEO
Re: Both have a place
Bert22306   9/27/2013 7:55:47 PM
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Yes, although those would be a new type of road sign. I was thinking more along the lines of the way the police can now scan regular old license plates. You're talking about a new form of V2I, which of course may be more optimal for electronic sensing.

Les_Slater
User Rank
CEO
Re: Both have a place
Les_Slater   9/27/2013 7:49:34 PM
Road signs could be read by radar, as long as some sort of transponder, say RFID, were embeded. This would be a less ambiguous approach.

Frank Eory
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CEO
Re: B/W image sensor that reads 'red'
Frank Eory   9/27/2013 7:05:15 PM
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I think it would be far more useful to detect the color yellow rather than red. I strongly suspect that the number of drivers who are simply unaware of a red light and drive right through it is far less than the number who are perfectly well aware of the yellow light and then step on the gas to try to beat it before it turns red.

A yellow light sensor aimed up at the traffic light would work nicely with simple computations that factor in the vehicle's speed and braking distance, and then alert the driver as to whether he or she can make the light or not. If not, perhaps even apply the brakes for him.

Bert22306
User Rank
CEO
Re: Both have a place
Bert22306   9/27/2013 4:51:05 PM
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I meant, it's all E&M. Not all RF. Sorry.

Bert22306
User Rank
CEO
Both have a place
Bert22306   9/27/2013 4:50:18 PM
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It's all RF, so really we're talking about advantages of different ranges of wavelengths. If you want to read road signs, you can't do that with radar. If you want to see through thick fog, the optical spectrum becomes less than ideal. If you need to difrerentiate between cars clustered close together, say waiting at an inrsection, again radar might not be so good. Each car will look like a blob, and blobs will tend to blend together.

Also, not to be ignored is radiation hazard. I would caution against the notion that radar will be very long range. The last thing we need is to be bombarded with focused radar beam radiation the instant we get behind the wheel. Imagine traveling along a busy interstate with all cars around training radar beams at you, at short range. Or at stop lights. This will need to be carefully worked out.

Les_Slater
User Rank
CEO
Re: why so closed?
Les_Slater   9/27/2013 4:44:24 PM
Not only NOT a fantasy, but could happen faster than we might expect. There is comercial incentive to make vehicles, and their passengers, including driver, more connected to the web. It's just one more step to integrate driver assistance. With real time vehicle information sent to some sort of cellular network, the network could be sending heads up info back. The vehicles would still have a high level of autonomous responsibilty but would not be so blind to a larger picture. Fixed sensors could be later integrated.

Les_Slater
User Rank
CEO
Re: Radar IVI
Les_Slater   9/27/2013 4:08:50 PM
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Don't know how present systems work, maybe interference is not such an issue with current level of deploiment. However, this can be pretty much avoided if pulse width is short, duty cycle is sufficiently low and and pulse timing is random. There will be sufficient consistancy in tracking objects that interference can be rejected.

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