Embedded Systems Conference
Breaking News
Comments
Oldest First | Newest First | Threaded View
Page 1 / 3   >   >>
rick merritt
User Rank
Author
Nice job...
rick merritt   9/27/2013 12:49:31 PM
NO RATINGS
...sorting through a ton of deeply technical material to find a core competitive ground.

krisi
User Rank
Author
Re: Nice job...
krisi   9/27/2013 1:20:41 PM
NO RATINGS
Yes, this is increasing complex field with smaller number of increasing larger players being involved...finFET vs FDSOI...any best who is going to win? Kris

wilber_xbox
User Rank
Author
Re: Nice job...
wilber_xbox   9/27/2013 1:33:20 PM
NO RATINGS
I wonder why Intel is holding back its progress on 14nm FinFET. Looks like its TSMC vs rest in IEDM.

krisi
User Rank
Author
Re: Nice job...
krisi   9/27/2013 2:35:48 PM
NO RATINGS
I think Intel is still doing finFET

KB3001
User Rank
Author
Re: Nice job...
KB3001   9/28/2013 6:39:01 AM
NO RATINGS
I heard conflicting messages about this Kris (finFET vs FDSOI). Some say FDSOI controls leakage better than fitFET and is much easier to design. As such it will be the technology to succeed. Others say finFET is already the winner. I guess the proof of the pudding is in the eating....

krisi
User Rank
Author
Re: Nice job...
krisi   9/28/2013 10:25:04 AM
NO RATINGS
Yes, they are very different technologies...finFET exploits silicon surface in a third dimension so you would expect every good Ion current but probably some difficulties in controlling Ioff...FDSoi takes advantage of thin silicon body so Ioff leakage is-likely easier to control but Ion values are not as good....so I think finFET will be better for high speed and FDSOI better for very low power...Kris

KB3001
User Rank
Author
Re: Nice job...
KB3001   9/28/2013 10:31:28 AM
NO RATINGS
That's what I think too, Kris, finFET for high performance and FDSOI for low power, or may be a combination of the two??

michigan0
User Rank
Author
FinFET vs.FDSOI
michigan0   9/28/2013 5:44:33 PM
NO RATINGS
Here are some important facts about FDSOI technology. FDSOI was invented by IBM over a decade ago, but still not manufacturable at any technology node yet despite of enormous efforts and resouces were spent by IBM research and its International SOI consortium mainly because Soitec, the largest SOI wafer supplier can't deliver 7 nm thin SOI that is required for manufacturing of 28 nm FDSOI. AT 2011 SOI Conference at Phoenix, AZ Soitec announced that what it could deliver is 12 nm thin SOI wafer, not 7 nm SOI. For FDSOI at 20/22 nm an extremely thin 5 nm SOI is required to overcome the short channel effects or transistor leakage current. That is why FDSOI still not manufacturable even at 28nm today, and will not be manufacturable at 20/22 nm and beyond. FinFET is only technology in volume manufacturing for a couple of years at 22 nm by Intel, and 14 nm in late this year. TSMC appears to introduce its FinFET manufacturing in 2014. Beauty of FinFET is that it is extendable to the end of scaling according to FinFET physics. FDSOI can't contest with FinFET. There is alternative to FinFET today. Skim 

michigan0
User Rank
Author
FinFET vs.FDSOI
michigan0   9/28/2013 6:19:51 PM
NO RATINGS
one correction posted below by michigan: The last sentence should be read,  no alternative to FinFET today instead of alternative to FinFET today.

AKH0
User Rank
Author
Re: FinFET vs.FDSOI
AKH0   9/29/2013 3:47:47 AM
Michigan0, the reason SOITEC delivers 12nm SOI wafer is not because they cannot deliver thinner wafers. It is simply because they are asked to do so. Any person familar with CMOS technology recongnizes that you need to consume a few nanometer to form STI (pad oxide needed before deposited pad nitride), then you need a few nanometer oxide for your I/O devices. Once you do the math, you realize that for a taget channel thickness of 6-7 nanometer you have to start somewhat thicker and this is exactly what has been asked from SOITEC and SEH. Unless you want to use deposited oxide for pad-ox and I/O devices (which is of course inferior to thermal oxide) this is what you'd need. Again, anybody that processed CMOS wafers knows that thermal oxidation is precisely controlled -- for our reference gate oxide was about 1nm thick with less than 5% variation before people switched to high-k.


As far as thickness control goes, in fact FDSOI has significant advantage over FinFET. The device is planar, which means you have a variety of well established methods to monitor thickness on as-received wafer and during processing, including ellipsometry and AFM. Metrology is a big problem with FinFET. Let alone the loading effects in depositing the spacer in SIT process and in etching the fins. Yes, FinFET is in mass production but I can say with enough confidence that it did NOT deliver the promissed 50% reduction in power that was claimed back in 2011 even after supposedly toc of Haswell.

 

Page 1 / 3   >   >>


Radio
NEXT UPCOMING BROADCAST
In conjunction with unveiling of EE Times’ Silicon 60 list, journalist & Silicon 60 researcher Peter Clarke hosts a conversation on startups in the electronics industry. One of Silicon Valley's great contributions to the world has been the demonstration of how the application of entrepreneurship and venture capital to electronics and semiconductor hardware can create wealth with developments in semiconductors, displays, design automation, MEMS and across the breadth of hardware developments. But in recent years concerns have been raised that traditional venture capital has turned its back on hardware-related startups in favor of software and Internet applications and services. Panelists from incubators join Peter Clarke in debate.
Flash Poll
Top Comments of the Week
Like Us on Facebook

Datasheets.com Parts Search

185 million searchable parts
(please enter a part number or hit search to begin)
Special Video Section
The LT®3042 is a high performance low dropout linear ...
Chwan-Jye Foo (C.J Foo), product marketing manager for ...
The LT®3752/LT3752-1 are current mode PWM controllers ...
LED lighting is an important feature in today’s and future ...
Active balancing of series connected battery stacks exists ...
After a four-year absence, Infineon returns to Mobile World ...
A laptop’s 65-watt adapter can be made 6 times smaller and ...
An industry network should have device and data security at ...
The LTC2975 is a four-channel PMBus Power System Manager ...
In this video, a new high speed CMOS output comparator ...
The LT8640 is a 42V, 5A synchronous step-down regulator ...
The LTC2000 high-speed DAC has low noise and excellent ...
How do you protect the load and ensure output continues to ...
General-purpose DACs have applications in instrumentation, ...
Linear Technology demonstrates its latest measurement ...
10:29
Demos from Maxim Integrated at Electronica 2014 show ...
Bosch CEO Stefan Finkbeiner shows off latest combo and ...
STMicroelectronics demoed this simple gesture control ...
Keysight shows you what signals lurk in real-time at 510MHz ...
TE Connectivity's clear-plastic, full-size model car shows ...