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Duane Benson
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Very interesting
Duane Benson   10/4/2013 5:52:01 PM
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I typically think of these types of products in terms of useability by developers. This shows a little something else - modable by customers. Gamers mod their games with low-barier-to-entry languages like Lua. Products like this one use Python and open web APIs to deliver modability to hardware devices.

A few decades ago, it was pretty common for people to put differnt carburators, shocks or shifters on their cars. I wonder if we're entering an era where similar activities will be possible in consumer electronics.

I can see it: Buy a set of phsiological sensors to help with some sport. Then Oops, you break a leg. Re-program the device to monitor healing progress.

rick merritt
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Re: Very interesting
rick merritt   10/7/2013 1:44:46 AM
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@Duane: I like this idea of mass customization. Very practical if it can be reduced to a simple GUI.

antedeluvian
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I could be tempted
antedeluvian   10/4/2013 6:32:04 PM
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This has some great potential. I can think of several things I would like to monitor.

All I need to start with is a sensor to see where my time goes- then I can look at the others.

Duane Benson
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Re: I could be tempted
Duane Benson   10/4/2013 7:27:18 PM
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"All I need to start with is a sensor to see where my time goes- then I can look at the others"

Then I'd just need some time optimization routines.

David Ashton
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Bitalino
David Ashton   10/4/2013 10:59:07 PM
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Interesting goodie.  Years ago Practical Electronics offered a couple of articles on a "Biofeedback" monitor which used feedback form your brain waves  to help you relax (among other things).  I have the articles but not the time to build the damn thing.   This does not seem to offer any EEG (brain wave) monitoring directly, but I might read more and see if it can do that.  (sigh - there's so much interesting stuff around....)

Garcia-Lasheras
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Re: Bitalino
Garcia-Lasheras   10/5/2013 6:25:20 PM
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@David: "Years ago Practical Electronics offered a couple of articles on a "Biofeedback" monitor which used feedback form your brain waves  to help you relax (among other things)"

The electronics for building EEG is quite simple indeed: you only need a bunch of instrumentation amplifiers and some conductive gel.

About "Biofeedback", this is still an active technique. A couple of years ago, I was trained for some sessions -- but I soon gave up!!.

In addition, my sister attended to some demos while studying her nursery degree in which some guys handled some computes controls by using monitorized brain waves.

David Ashton
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Re: Bitalino
David Ashton   10/5/2013 6:45:09 PM
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@Garcia...thanks for that....the PE one just used 741s (well this was in 1973!).  If I built it I'd use IAs or at least higher spec opamps, but sounds like the Bitalino could do this sort of stuff quite easily (I think ECG and muscle activity signals are of similar amplitudes to brain waves, and pickup techniques are similar)?

Garcia-Lasheras
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Re: Bitalino
Garcia-Lasheras   10/5/2013 7:21:58 PM
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@David: "I think ECG and muscle activity signals are of similar amplitudes to brain waves, and pickup techniques are similar"

Yes, you are completly right. About five years ago, a doctor that worked in a local hospital called me in order to evaluate the possibility of creating a start-up company.

He worked on EMG for healing muscular injuries and the signal amplitudes and frequencies were so easy to deal with -- tens of milivolts and KHz range. But the point was that the medical certified cables and sensors were extremely expensive!!

In this way, I think this project is very interesting -- the problem is certification if you want to use it in professional medical products.

By the way... the conductive gel is used in the next way.
  • Apply it over the skin in order to increase conductivity.
  • Then,  you need to scratch the most external skin layer -- but you don't need a flesh wound!!
  • Finally, attach a conductive sensor over the wet scratched skin
  • And you are ready to work!!

I must confess that I did some simple tests by just attaching an oscilloscope to my arm in different points :-)

David Ashton
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Re: Bitalino
David Ashton   10/5/2013 8:02:05 PM
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@Garcia - this would only be a hobby project so no certification necessary,

For the electrodes, the PE project used copper or brass disks, covered in lint which they recommend soaking in salt water for conductivity, applied to skin cleaned with shampoo or surgical spirit.   I tried to post a pic but cannot get it to work.   I read somewhere else that nickel-silver coins, with a socket or clip soldered on, are also good electrodes.



 

 

 

Sheetal.Pandey
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Re: Bitalino
Sheetal.Pandey   10/6/2013 9:39:27 AM
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Quite interesting. Looks like with this one can do many test themselves without going to healhcare faclities. One day I was walking under sun and felt dizy thought if I can make my own blood pressure mnitoring device.

Max The Magnificent
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Re: Bitalino
Max The Magnificent   10/8/2013 11:44:36 AM
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@David: Years ago Practical Electronics offered a couple of articles on a "Biofeedback" monitor which used feedback form your brain waves  to help you relax (among other things).

I built that when I was a young lad!

rick merritt
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Plug and play
rick merritt   10/7/2013 1:45:53 AM
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I like the modularity of the plug and play hardware.



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