Breaking News
Comments
Newest First | Oldest First | Threaded View
<<   <   Page 3 / 5   >   >>
Marlski
User Rank
Author
Re: Cold to the Core
Marlski   10/15/2013 7:15:28 PM
NO RATINGS
I have an 8K core memory board hanging on my office wall, once belonging to a DEC something or another,  just below a couple of (very old) Marconi Wireless Telegraph Company stock certificates. There was a story floating around Control Data's early days about its core memory and how the tiny magnetic donuts were hand threaded in Hong Kong because the process needed the fine and delicate hands of Asian women. The location was affectionately known as "Bill Norris' Far East Core House"!

Cheers,

Terry

VE3COM

betajet
User Rank
Author
Re: Bubbles, HDDs, and more
betajet   10/15/2013 6:41:25 PM
NO RATINGS
My favorite historical memory device is the Univac FASTRAND moving head magnetic drum unit, which stored data on the surface of a heavy drum approx 6 feet long by 1 foot in diameter.  The Devil's DP Dictionary defined it as "a device for storing angular momentum".  The gyroscopic effect of the drum was so strong they had to add a counter-rotating drum so that the 4,500-pound unit wouldn't turn as the Earth rotated.

betajet
User Rank
Author
Re: More Memory= More Code
betajet   10/15/2013 6:32:53 PM
NO RATINGS
Parkinson's Law applied to computers: "Programs expand to fill all available memory".

betajet
User Rank
Author
Re: More Memory= More Code
betajet   10/15/2013 6:29:01 PM
NO RATINGS
Foo, my first computer had just 3 bits of memory!  And hard-coded instructions.

Max The Magnificent
User Rank
Author
Re: More Memory= More Code
Max The Magnificent   10/15/2013 5:39:42 PM
NO RATINGS
@David: I'm sure we had more fun with these tiny memories than we do now.

I think Janine made a good point -- today's code writers often don't even try to make things "mean-and-lean" because they have so much RAM and hard disk storage to play with...

David Ashton
User Rank
Author
Re: More Memory= More Code
David Ashton   10/15/2013 5:21:16 PM
NO RATINGS
... and before anyone says anything, now I'M the one with the tiny memory..... :-))

David Ashton
User Rank
Author
Re: More Memory= More Code
David Ashton   10/15/2013 5:20:23 PM
NO RATINGS
@Max, Antedeluvian... I should know better than to open my big mouth on EE Times.... :-)   I'm sure we had more fun with these tiny memories than we do now.  

Max The Magnificent
User Rank
Author
Re: More Memory= More Code
Max The Magnificent   10/15/2013 5:16:47 PM
NO RATINGS
@David: ...had just 1K of RAM...

You had a whole 1K of RAM? We used to dream of 1K of RAM when I was a lad...

JeremySCook
User Rank
Author
Re: Cold to the Core
JeremySCook   10/15/2013 5:02:42 PM
NO RATINGS
Wow, I should really check my terminology!  Thanks for pointing this out, I'll see if I can get it corrected.

antedeluvian
User Rank
Author
Re: More Memory= More Code
antedeluvian   10/15/2013 5:02:39 PM
NO RATINGS
David

 OK, I can beat you all. My first computer, a Sinclair ZX81 (used to be called Timex in the states) had just 1K of RAM.

I'll see your Sinclair and raise you by an Elf. I built my first computer based around the design for the RCA 1802 Cosmac Elf. It had 256 bytes of CMOS memory and that consisted of 2 chips! When I developed our first product I used a 1K x8 bipolar PROM that I turned on and off to conserve power, and after partioning the software functionality paged in ~200 bytes ar a time (needed scratchpad,stack etc in the rest).

<<   <   Page 3 / 5   >   >>


Datasheets.com Parts Search

185 million searchable parts
(please enter a part number or hit search to begin)
Radio
LATEST ARCHIVED BROADCAST

What are the engineering and design challenges in creating successful IoT devices? These devices are usually small, resource-constrained electronics designed to sense, collect, send, and/or interpret data. Some of the devices need to be smart enough to act upon data in real time, 24/7. Specifically the guests will discuss sensors, security, and lessons from IoT deployments.

Brought to you by:

Like Us on Facebook
Special Video Section
In this short video we show an LED light demo to ...
02:46
Wireless Power enables applications where it is difficult ...
07:41
LEDs are being used in current luxury model automotive ...
With design sizes expected to increase by 5X through 2020, ...
01:48
Linear Technology’s LT8330 and LT8331, two Low Quiescent ...
The quality and reliability of Mill-Max's two-piece ...
LED lighting is an important feature in today’s and future ...
05:27
The LT8602 has two high voltage buck regulators with an ...
05:18
Silego Technology’s highly versatile Mixed-signal GreenPAK ...
The quality and reliability of Mill-Max's two-piece ...
01:34
Why the multicopter? It has every thing in it. 58 of ...
Security is important in all parts of the IoT chain, ...
Infineon explains their philosophy and why the multicopter ...
The LTC4282 Hot SwapTM controller allows a board to be ...
This video highlights the Zynq® UltraScale+™ MPSoC, and sho...
Homeowners may soon be able to store the energy generated ...
The LTC®6363 is a low power, low noise, fully differential ...
See the Virtex® UltraScale+™ FPGA with 32.75G backplane ...
Vincent Ching, applications engineer at Avago Technologies, ...
The LT®6375 is a unity-gain difference amplifier which ...