Embedded Systems Conference
Breaking News
Comments
Newest First | Oldest First | Threaded View
<<   <   Page 3 / 4   >   >>
zeeglen
User Rank
Author
Re: Bridge circuits
zeeglen   10/22/2013 10:03:23 AM
NO RATINGS
Definitely diamond, but not all CAD systems allow this.

Some CAD systems demand the dot to recognize the connection.  For example, in TinyCAD without the dot a T intersection is not considered part of the same net; when highlighting that net the T branch does not highlight.

One nice thing in a CAD system is the ability to place simulation results and actual measured scope plots directly onto the schematic, in color.  The art has come a long way since I was first forced to use Daisy instead of my pencil.

MeasurementBlues
User Rank
Author
Re: Bridge circuits
MeasurementBlues   10/22/2013 9:01:13 AM
NO RATINGS
@David, the diamond schematic in my comment doens;t use dots to indicate connections. Should it? That's another alway's debateable convention: dots or no dots. I prefer dots  because sometimes having lies cross in unavoidable. When that occurs, a dot makes i clear that there's a connection. Some get around then by having only T interestions, avoiding crosses (+).

MeasurementBlues
User Rank
Author
Re: Schematics
MeasurementBlues   10/22/2013 8:57:04 AM
NO RATINGS
>Our former analog editor Stephan Ohr educated me about the value of good schematics.

How so?

rick merritt
User Rank
Author
Re: Schematics
rick merritt   10/21/2013 11:11:44 PM
NO RATINGS
Our former analog editor Stephan Ohr educated me about the value of good schematics.

David Ashton
User Rank
Author
Re: Bridge circuits
David Ashton   10/21/2013 10:41:03 PM
NO RATINGS
Diamond's much nicer.  It LOOKS like the part.

MeasurementBlues
User Rank
Author
Bridge circuits
MeasurementBlues   10/21/2013 9:28:35 PM
NO RATINGS
Do you draw bridge circuits in a diamond shape or a rectangular shape/ The first time I saw a rectifier circuit drawn in rectangular style, it threw me for a minute or two.



 

or

 



MeasurementBlues
User Rank
Author
Let to right
MeasurementBlues   10/21/2013 9:23:34 PM
NO RATINGS
Schematics should flow left to right except for feedback loops.

betajet
User Rank
Author
Hooray for Heathkit!
betajet   10/21/2013 7:49:59 PM
NO RATINGS
I remember Heathkit schematics as being particularly well-drawn.  I think a lot of the quality of the older drawings was that mechanical drawing was at that time a required engineering skill and something people did with great pride.  A sloppy drawing indicated sloppy engineering.  In Jules Verne's The Begum's Fortune (1879), the hero infiltrates into the enemy's Metropolis-like factory through outstanding mechanical drawing ability.

One of my pet peeves is the terrible automatically-generated logic diagrams one gets from logic synthesizers.  IMO they're practically useless for anything but the simplest designs -- I'd much rather have textual equations.

_hm
User Rank
Author
needs notes and some values
_hm   10/21/2013 6:13:42 PM
NO RATINGS
If schematic is annotated with some notes and few caluculated values, it is further helpful to many people for future reference.

Bert22306
User Rank
Author
Crictui diagrams are another art form
Bert22306   10/21/2013 4:16:38 PM
NO RATINGS
They have to look good, for heaven's sake, like any other art form. In the tube days, the tubes were often lined up on top, and all the passive components feeding them underneath. In the early transistor days, I noticed the same drawing style. But now, and I think for good reason, the active components are not typically separated.

There's nothing like a well executed, complementary symmetry analog circuit diagram, NPN on top, PNP on bottom, IMO. I like the power supply bypass capacitors to be shown close to the component they are bypassing for. And yes, chips tend to not have their inner workings show, because aside from the simplest of chips, that would be practically impossible.

<<   <   Page 3 / 4   >   >>


Most Recent Comments
Susan Rambo
 
MFahmy0
 
cd2012
 
junko.yoshida
 
MikeD95101
 
betajet
 
junko.yoshida
 
Bill_Higdon
 
Tom_C
Radio
LATEST ARCHIVED BROADCAST
Overview: Battle-hardened veterans of the electronics industry have heard of the “connected car” so often that they assume it’s a done deal. But do we really know what it takes to get a car connected and what its future entails? Join EE Times editor Junko Yoshida as she moderates a panel of movers and shakers in the connected car business. Executives from Cisco, Siemens and NXP will share ideas, plans and hopes for connected cars and their future. After the first 30 minutes of the radio show, our listeners will have the opportunity to ask questions via live online chat.
Flash Poll
Like Us on Facebook

Datasheets.com Parts Search

185 million searchable parts
(please enter a part number or hit search to begin)
Special Video Section
LED lighting is an important feature in today’s and future ...
Active balancing of series connected battery stacks exists ...
After a four-year absence, Infineon returns to Mobile World ...
A laptop’s 65-watt adapter can be made 6 times smaller and ...
An industry network should have device and data security at ...
The LTC2975 is a four-channel PMBus Power System Manager ...
In this video, a new high speed CMOS output comparator ...
The LT8640 is a 42V, 5A synchronous step-down regulator ...
The LTC2000 high-speed DAC has low noise and excellent ...
How do you protect the load and ensure output continues to ...
General-purpose DACs have applications in instrumentation, ...
Linear Technology demonstrates its latest measurement ...
10:29
Demos from Maxim Integrated at Electronica 2014 show ...
Bosch CEO Stefan Finkbeiner shows off latest combo and ...
STMicroelectronics demoed this simple gesture control ...
Keysight shows you what signals lurk in real-time at 510MHz ...
TE Connectivity's clear-plastic, full-size model car shows ...
Why culture makes Linear Tech a winner.
Recently formed Architects of Modern Power consortium ...
Specially modified Corvette C7 Stingray responds to ex Indy ...