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David Ashton
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Re: Bridge circuits
David Ashton   10/22/2013 5:07:42 PM
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Hi Glen....this is the 2nd mention of TinyCAD I have seen in a week.  Gotta have a look I think.

David Ashton
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Re: Bridge circuits
David Ashton   10/22/2013 5:05:35 PM
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I don't like dots.  I think that comes from my distant past when photocopiers were a bit "muddy" and a dot and a cross would look very similar.  Fot that reason I use a half-moon "jump" where wires cross.  However this is when I do my own (usually simple) schematics by hand or with MS Paint (luddite, aren't I?)   With CAD programs you pretty much have to take what you get it seems, and the drawing style would hardly be a game changer....

brlamont
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Re: Schematic Style
brlamont   10/22/2013 4:25:37 PM
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Here, here!  In the life of a schematic the engineer spends about 1% of his/her time with it.  The rest of the time someone else has to read it and try and understand how the design works - and they usually have less education.  It is CRITCAL that the development engineer take some time to make a clean schematic.  It also goes a long way in helping the layout guy understand signal flow and layout.

I have to laugh sometimes at the way some schematics are done because it is usually a reflection of the way the development engineer thinks.  If the schematic is a mess, the engineer doesn't usually think clearly or make clear decisions.

GMilliorn
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Freelancer
Tube Schematic link error
GMilliorn   10/22/2013 3:37:20 PM
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FYI the link to the tube schematic points to the transistor radio schematic.

JohnMMoore
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Rookie
Schematic Style
JohnMMoore   10/22/2013 3:34:46 PM
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The main reason to take time to create a 'clean' schematic is that it is more than a graphical netlist. It is both the design and the design's documentation. It's likely someone else will look at it, and the kind thing to do is make it easy for everyone else to quickly understand the designer's intent.

I've heard it said that confusing designs (both schematic and code) are likely a reflection of the designer's own confusion - not true in all cases, but ceratainly in some. My own take is that messy schematics and code are, basically, selfish - the designer doesn't care if they're clear to anyone else. And this can lead to real costs down the line. Taking the time to create a tidy schematic within the confines of page size, symbol size, and schedule will pay off in the long run, and reflect well on the designer.

 

betajet
User Rank
CEO
Re: Bridge circuits
betajet   10/22/2013 1:43:38 PM
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The diamond looks the part if the package contains a bridge with four diodes.  If the bridge is made from two SOT-23 packages each with a pair of diodes, then the Manhattan placement looks like the parts.

betajet
User Rank
CEO
Re: Bridge circuits
betajet   10/22/2013 1:39:46 PM
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I'd run the nets connected to the LT4321 pins IN36 and IN78 around the outside of the bridges and connect them to the right-most points of the bridges.  That leaves the inside of the bridges empty.

Alternatively, I'd consider rotatating the bridge transistors so they're in line and the gate connections are straight.  I think this ends up with a visually simpler diagram, though you do lose the obviousness of the bridge.

betajet
User Rank
CEO
To dot or not to do, that is the question
betajet   10/22/2013 1:32:49 PM
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I leave out the connection dots if they're inside a component symbol, and include them to join net wires that are outside component symbols.  So if the bridge is a single 4-pin component, no dots.  But if the bridge is composed of discrete diodes, then yes dots.

MeasurementBlues
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Blogger
Re: Bridge circuits
MeasurementBlues   10/22/2013 12:07:39 PM
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Speaking of bridge circuits. A press release with this digram just came to my inbox. A bridge with MOSFETs. Note the diamond bridge with the connections not always on the points. How would you redraw this schematic?



 

 

EB2
User Rank
Rookie
PCB Layout?
EB2   10/22/2013 11:27:38 AM
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It looks like the schematic layout was the first step to the PCB layout. Like the "style" David A. describes with netnames on each component pin and nothing else, the schematic is a necessary evil in order to design the PCB.

For those of use who realize the importance of design reviews (even by yourself), and don't have the luxury of ATE but require air-breathing technicians to troubleshoot circuit boards, the time spent on schematic layout is paid back many fold.

Many many many years ago, while at a training session for schematic capture software, I asked about automatic off-page location references for networks. The instructor asked me why that was necessary, since the connection is defined. I had to explain the warm-body-troubleshooting scenerio.

As far as bypass cap locations, I want it to be easy to verify bypass caps during a design review. If having them at the primary symbol makes that area cluttered, then include a text note at the cap with the Ref Des of the associated IC. A similar issue are invisible (on the schematic) power and ground connections. If you don't want them on the primary gate of the IC, then have a power-connection gate, which is also a convenient location for the bypass cap.

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