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Les_Slater
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CEO
Re: Toyota's culpability here is the tip of the iceberg for everyone
Les_Slater   10/28/2013 11:25:27 AM
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JCreasey, Autonomous vehicles can actually make the problem less difficult, not in overall complexity, but oversight of the situation, situational awareness. In the Toyota scenario that we're discussing there is no way to independently judge intent, or consequences,

Les_Slater
User Rank
CEO
Re: Securing future for automobile electronics control
Les_Slater   10/28/2013 10:46:32 AM
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Bert, I had a mechanical throttle malfunction also. It was '53 Buick V8 with a Dynaflow automatic transmission. Somehow an acceleration attempt over compressed a worn motor mount to the extent that the engine torque rotated the engine block, relative to the engine compartment, beyond design tolerance for the integrity of the totally mechanical carburetor linkage and it jammed, wide open. I quickly turned off the key, which brought me to problem number two, no power steering and I was on a winding road and had to turn the ignition back on to steer. A fortunate section of straight road allowed me to kill the engine and bring it to a safe stop.

jring614
User Rank
Rookie
No Mo Bug
jring614   10/28/2013 10:23:12 AM
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Recent technology breakthroughs make it possible to find all faults in a computer program and all incompatibilities between multiple computer programs in seconds.

www.ontopilot.com

Furthermore, this can be done, instruction by instruction, at code execution time so hardware failures, electrical glitches or cyberintrusions can be nullified. 

DO-178C is a nice try but does not ensure that all faults are found.

MeasurementBlues
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Who tested this thing?
MeasurementBlues   10/28/2013 10:17:34 AM
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@RoboticsDeveloper, good to hear from you again. "Given all that I read in the article it makes me quite concerned about self driving cars."

The lawyers must be salivating at the thought of self-driving cars. Accidents will occur even then, and there will be no driver error as the cause. The blame will fall to the auto makers, designers of the roads, municipalities of these raids are not properly maintained, and so on.

 

Robotics Developer
User Rank
Rookie
Re: Black box?
Robotics Developer   10/28/2013 10:07:13 AM
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Rich Pell, that was what I read into that statement.  What worries me more is that it was possible to record false data in the first place.  That seems to be a failure in the design that should have been caught early in the design review process.  All that said, I wonder how many drivers have been wrongly accused of being the cause when the Blackbox data is used and treated like it is an impartial data collection means???  Makes me wonder, for example: jury members for this trial NEEDED to have some technical understanding / discernement otherwise how could they come to the right conclusion?  If my dad had been on the jury most if not all of this would have been quite over his head.  This aspect of the trial I find very interesting and I wonder what the jury selection process entailed.

Robotics Developer
User Rank
Rookie
Re: Who tested this thing?
Robotics Developer   10/28/2013 10:02:21 AM
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MeasurementBlues, I thought the article implied the memory corruption  "may" have caused the bit flip.  Given all that I read in the article it makes me quite concerned about self driving cars.  I hope that there will be standards employed simular to the FDA's life critical devices.  With a little (very little) experience with fail safe coding and hardware design it seems obvious to me that cabling could fail in many ways.  Cable signal design should have provided for an easy means of detection of a single or multiple line cable falure, sort of like the old active low signals with pull ups for backplanes.  It is important to keep in mind the technical challenges involved in coding but I wonder if there should be an electronic override feature that provides either a fresh reload of code (if it is possible to do safely - I don't know what the reload/power up looks like) or a fully parrallel "simple" processor to allow for "direct" user control with minimal bells and features..  Just thinking that if nothing else, being able to TAKE back control in a manual as possible means would be at least reasurring.

rich.pell
User Rank
Blogger
Black box?
rich.pell   10/28/2013 9:21:51 AM
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Based on the following quote by Barr, it seems there was a black box in the car:

"We also obtained and reviewed the source code for the black box and found that it can record false information about the driver's actions in the final seconds before a crash."

Can we infer from this that the black box (or event data recorder (EDR)) in this case failed to show that the brakes were being applied as claimed by the plaintiff?   



rich.pell
User Rank
Blogger
Re: standard OS?
rich.pell   10/28/2013 9:09:08 AM
"It would be great if Barr Group could share their calculation of the probability of occurrence of the failure mechanisms they identified"

+1

Kinnar
User Rank
CEO
The rate of Increase of Acceleration
Kinnar   10/28/2013 9:04:57 AM
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Was the rate of acceleration was specified in any of the reports both the agencies had provided. Or in the event of accident it was found that how much approximate was the rate at which the car had accelerated?

coombes
User Rank
Rookie
Re: standard OS?
coombes   10/28/2013 8:45:31 AM
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The "failed to comply" simply refers to the general OSEK compliance testing.

There is (or was - it's been a while since I was involved in OSEK) a requirement that you submit your OSEK implementation for compliance testing before you are allowed to call it an OSEK-compliant operating system. Toyota's OSEK apparently hadn't been submitted for this testing, so was not officially OSEK-compliant (and couldn't legally refer to their OS as OSEK - as the trademark terms for OSEK say the only permitted use is for compliant OSs)

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