Embedded Systems Conference
Breaking News
Comments
junko.yoshida
User Rank
Author
Fuel cells gambit
junko.yoshida   11/11/2013 4:35:51 PM
NO RATINGS
1 saves
Fuel cells stories are something us reporters write, not every week, but every once in a blue moon. Every time when I look into the subject, I find it fascinating but also equally frustrating. This is the technology that should be here already; but it never seems to be quite here yet.

Although most of us probably do not think of Rohm when we think about fuel cells (at least not yet), it would be interesting to see how big an inroad the Kyoto-based company can make with its technology jointly developed with Aquafairy.

Bert22306
User Rank
Author
A great alternative to gasoline generators
Bert22306   11/11/2013 4:54:13 PM
NO RATINGS
It helps to do the chemical reactions to see what's involved here.

To make calcium hydride, you need to start with calcium chloride, sodium, and hydrogen. So somewhere along the chain of events, you'll either need electricity or you'll need a hydrocarbon fuel, say methane, to exract that hydrogen and make these chewing gum stick-like fuel thingies. (So you're likely going to be creating CO2 in the manufacturing process, is my basic point here. You need to generate H2 in order to make this fuel, which in turn will e releasing H2 when in use.)

CaCl2 + H2 + 2Na --> CaH2 + 2NaCl

So byproducts of this manufacturing process are most likely CO2 and table salt.

Then in use, CaH2 + 2H2O --> Ca(OH)2 + 2H2

So a byproduct in use is calcium hydroxide, which apparently has plenty of uses of its own. Perhaps it can be recycled. Otherwise, it's corrosive.

I can easily see the appeal as emergency power source. The fuel cell which uses this type of fuel makes no noise, unlike the annoyingly loud, typical engine generators. And, no rube goldberg assembly of moving parts.

But equally or more exciting might be, CaH2 can be in powder form, like salt. Like you see in those dissicant pouches. Perhaps then, it could also be used as fuel for fuel-cell EVs. Easier to distribute and to use as fuel in a car than high pressure H2 gas? Although it needs to be kept dry.

junko.yoshida
User Rank
Author
Re: A great alternative to gasoline generators
junko.yoshida   11/11/2013 5:06:32 PM
NO RATINGS
in case if you are interested in wht's involved in Rohm's hydrogen fuel cells, here it is.


Bert22306
User Rank
Author
Re: A great alternative to gasoline generators
Bert22306   11/11/2013 5:21:08 PM
NO RATINGS
Right, but that's like all fuel cells. The "no CO2" showing on the right is a little disingenuous, since you'll be creating CO2, more than likely, in the making of this CaH2 fuel.

That gray block on the left of your graphic is where the CaH2 fuel has water added to it, to make the H2 for the fuel cell. The chemical reactions I posted previously are what is needed to make that CaH2 fuel to begin with.

junko.yoshida
User Rank
Author
Re: A great alternative to gasoline generators
junko.yoshida   11/11/2013 5:42:01 PM
NO RATINGS
Bert, understood. Agreed.

pennyxie
User Rank
Author
Re: A great alternative to gasoline generators
pennyxie   11/12/2013 3:08:28 AM
NO RATINGS
As you said, CaH2 making process is frustrating. if people can make CaH2 with recycable  energy, it will be a little bit better in terms of energy efficiency.

And yes, CaH2 can be in power form, but it strongly reacts with wate to release hydrogen which is very difficult to control. We coating that with special martiral to keep it release hydrogen gradually and keep it safe to use. 

 

junko.yoshida
User Rank
Author
Re: A great alternative to gasoline generators
junko.yoshida   11/12/2013 8:29:39 AM
NO RATINGS
@pennyxie, thanks for chiming in. Nothing like hearing from Rohm's researcher. Again, thank you for adding perspectives here.

pennyxie
User Rank
Author
Re: A great alternative to gasoline generators
pennyxie   11/14/2013 4:03:55 AM
NO RATINGS
You are very welcome. We inspired by the comments so much. 

DrQuine
User Rank
Author
Backup power needs to be substantial to do any good
DrQuine   11/11/2013 7:32:03 PM
NO RATINGS
There certainly is a need for clean, inexpensive, portable emergency backup power. The need, however, is not to charge SmartPhones (which can be charged in a car or run off a small battery) or run 5 Watt LED lights which run for a long time on a battery. Small amounts of backup power (as 12 volts or inverted to 120 volts AC) can also be obtained from the cigarette lighter in a car. We do so every time we have a power failure at home.  The need is for power in excess of 1,000 watts (ideally 7,000 watts is needed to run a house) that can run refrigerators (the start-up current is substantial), home heating systems, and the like. Only an emergency backup system with such power levels will have a substantial market.

Crusty1
User Rank
Author
Re: Backup power needs to be substantial to do any good
Crusty1   11/12/2013 11:47:42 AM
@DrQuine: The need is for power in excess of 1,000 watts (ideally 7,000 watts is needed to run a house). As a dedicated home solar power generator, I agree with this statement.

In the perfect world and at an affordable price, I woud like to store my surplus energy in other than lead acid batteries, if i could split H 2 O with electricty to O2 and Hand use it in a fuel cell during nill geneating hours then I would be a happy bunny.

As it stands now I dump any surplas electricity into the hot water tank, which is best suited to solar water panel heating.

rick merritt
User Rank
Author
Sensors, too
rick merritt   11/12/2013 12:11:21 PM
NO RATINGS
Interesting story.

I also heard recently that Rohm bought Kionix to round out its sensor line, taking on sensor big dogs ST and Bosch. Batteries and sensors are both great components for the next big waves in electronics.

junko.yoshida
User Rank
Author
Re: Sensors, too
junko.yoshida   11/12/2013 1:17:03 PM
NO RATINGS
@Rick. Indeed, that Kionix acquisition by Rohm is definitely an interesting one. This Kyoto company should be watched closely.

BrainiacV
User Rank
Author
Portable use
BrainiacV   11/18/2013 11:37:50 AM
NO RATINGS
How about for camping equipment to keep food cool and provide lights as well as a charger?

I guess just a variation on emergency backup equipment, but I can see people buying camping equipment and then retasking it for emergencies.

What about heat? I never hear about heat generated from fuel cells in stories like this, but I hear about heat being a major factor that keeps them from being used in laptops and such.



Top Comments of the Week
Like Us on Facebook

Datasheets.com Parts Search

185 million searchable parts
(please enter a part number or hit search to begin)
EE Life
Frankenstein's Fix, Teardowns, Sideshows, Design Contests, Reader Content & More
Chris Wiltz, Managing Editor, Design News

10 Greatest Hoaxes in the History of Engineering
Chris Wiltz, Managing Editor, Design News
2 comments
You'll probably be reading your fair share of fake headlines on April 1, but phony tech news - both for scams and humor - aren't anything new. The history of science and technology is rife ...

Max Maxfield

My Mom the Radio Star
Max Maxfield
Post a comment
I've said it before and I'll say it again -- it's a funny old world when you come to think about it. Last Friday lunchtime, for example, I received an email from Tim Levell, the editor for ...

Bernard Cole

A Book For All Reasons
Bernard Cole
3 comments
Robert Oshana's recent book "Software Engineering for Embedded Systems (Newnes/Elsevier)," written and edited with Mark Kraeling, is a 'book for all reasons.' At almost 1,200 pages, it ...

latest comment mjlinden Thanks for your input!
Martin Rowe

Leonard Nimoy, We'll Miss you
Martin Rowe
5 comments
Like many of you, I was saddened to hear the news of Leonard Nimoy's death. His Star Trek character Mr. Spock was an inspiration to many of us who entered technical fields.

Special Video Section
After a four-year absence, Infineon returns to Mobile World ...
A laptop’s 65-watt adapter can be made 6 times smaller and ...
An industry network should have device and data security at ...
The LTC2975 is a four-channel PMBus Power System Manager ...
In this video, a new high speed CMOS output comparator ...
The LT8640 is a 42V, 5A synchronous step-down regulator ...
The LTC2000 high-speed DAC has low noise and excellent ...
How do you protect the load and ensure output continues to ...
General-purpose DACs have applications in instrumentation, ...
Linear Technology demonstrates its latest measurement ...
10:29
Demos from Maxim Integrated at Electronica 2014 show ...
Bosch CEO Stefan Finkbeiner shows off latest combo and ...
STMicroelectronics demoed this simple gesture control ...
Keysight shows you what signals lurk in real-time at 510MHz ...
TE Connectivity's clear-plastic, full-size model car shows ...
Why culture makes Linear Tech a winner.
Recently formed Architects of Modern Power consortium ...
Specially modified Corvette C7 Stingray responds to ex Indy ...
Avago’s ACPL-K30T is the first solid-state driver qualified ...
NXP launches its line of multi-gate, multifunction, ...
Radio
LATEST ARCHIVED BROADCAST
EE Times Senior Technical Editor Martin Rowe will interview EMC engineer Kenneth Wyatt.
Flash Poll