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Duane Benson
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I can't decide
Duane Benson   11/12/2013 11:28:03 PM
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I own one of his X-Proto lab tiny scopes, which I like very much. From the video, the "watch" scope looks to share the same command set and functionality. The X-Proto is in the form-factor of a development board, so everything is exposed.

On the one hand, I agree with some of the concerns about having your project essentially tethered to your wrist. Just because you can build something, doesn't mean you should.

On the other hand, The little scope doesn't really replace a conventional desktop scope, but it's incredibly handy to have around. Wearing it will keep it close by if you need it. It helps keep the clutter off of a desk and it gives it a solid base, keeping it from sliding around the bench. The X-Proto is so small that it's easily overpowered by the wires attached to it. I pretty much find it necessary to keep it in a solderless breadboard. Wearing it would mitigate that issue.

Also, it reminds me of the calculator watches I used to wear - but much cooler. I'm leaning toward thinking it's positive attributes outweigh the negatives.

 

MeasurementBlues
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Re: I can't decide
MeasurementBlues   11/13/2013 11:07:50 AM
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"I'm leaning toward thinking it's positive attributes outweigh the negatives."

Duane, thanks for your observation. That being tied down really jumped out at me when viewing the video.

MeasurementBlues
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Re: I can't decide
MeasurementBlues   11/15/2013 1:22:33 PM
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Wearing it will keep it close by if you need it. It helps keep the clutter off of a desk and it gives it a solid base,

@Duane, it might be more useful to wear the scope above your elbow. That gives freedom to your wrist and hand, You just need long enough probe wires.

MPOP
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Rookie
Re: I can't decide
MPOP   11/18/2013 5:30:59 AM
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It's a very nice ideea, making such an oscilloscope. It seems to be very usefull to on field working persons, who debug digital circuits (more and more less power consuming). It can be further improved: a few fuses could add some protection to the carring person; also some miniatural high voltage rated reed relays could help. I think it deserves a chance to be brought to consumers use. Also it seems quite a collection piece for amateurs and hobyists. Congratulations to the inventor!

Some Guy
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CEO
Just another way to win the Darwin Award
Some Guy   11/13/2013 12:51:26 PM
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Usually, its Rednecks that are associated with the phrase "Look what I can do." Followed by a Darwin Award-winning event. Good to see that us Geeks can get in on the act, too. :)

In the end this is a false dilemma. We don't have just two choices between not using this or zorching ourselves. One could simply use a wireless interface from the probes to the watch (display). When it comes to personal safety, isolated inputs are a good thing.

Sounds like a great add-on sales opportunity, of the "did you want tires with that?" variety.

MeasurementBlues
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Re: Just another way to win the Darwin Award
MeasurementBlues   11/15/2013 1:19:54 PM
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Did you mean "Sounds like a great add-on sales opportunity, of the "did you want wires with that?"

RichQ
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CEO
Would you really wear it while using?
RichQ   11/13/2013 12:54:14 PM
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For me, the issue of being wired up and then moving is kind of moot. I would more likely do what the video shows elsewhere and take the watch off if I am making any kind of sustained measurement. Mostly because I will want both hands free. If I do use the scope while wearing it, I would do so only for a very quick set of tests, and probably be using a probe that is not attached to the test point but simply held there.

I imagine, however, that the problem is temporary anyway. The first accessory I would expect to see come out for this watch is a wireless probe. You plug in a radio attachment to the watch's input ports, and it receives signals from the probes. So you can leave the DUT instrumented, walk away, and come back later to make a quick check without needing to move any wires. With a 200khz analog bandwidth and 8-bit resolution on the scope, this should not be too difficult to achieve.

BTW, it has now reached its funding goal, with four days left to go.

MeasurementBlues
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Re: Would you really wear it while using?
MeasurementBlues   11/15/2013 1:18:43 PM
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I would more likely do what the video shows elsewhere and take the watch off if I am making any kind of sustained measurement.

Well then, you might as well have a pocket-sized oscilloscope, no?

RichQ
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CEO
Re: Would you really wear it while using?
RichQ   11/15/2013 1:48:46 PM
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No, if I had a pocket size oscilloscope I would need to remember to keep it in my pocket, and it would probably fall out when I bent down to pick up something else I dropped. No, having it on the wrist means I have it when I need it, which is never when I expect to need it.

MeasurementBlues
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Re: Would you really wear it while using?
MeasurementBlues   11/15/2013 2:54:55 PM
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What about wearing it on your arm, above the elbow?

RichQ
User Rank
CEO
Re: Would you really wear it while using?
RichQ   11/15/2013 3:02:55 PM
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Naw, every time I lift something heavy the bulging biceps on my Schwartzaneggar-type arms would break the retention band. The wrist will do fine. I'll either use a single probe for a quick test while it is on my wrist, or unlimber it to free both my hands if I need something more sustained. Chances are, I would use something like this only for quick checks, though.



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