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Les_Slater
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Re: BP
Les_Slater   11/15/2013 9:46:54 AM
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I agree blood pressure is very important. Not sure if there's any technology that would fit what we're talking about here. Also, electrolyte monitoring would be very useful.

Les_Slater
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Combine all this with Lifestyle monitoring and advice
Les_Slater   11/15/2013 9:15:06 AM
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Of course, this is the wave of the future in medicine. We already use mobile platforms for much of personal lives. One problem is that as we get more dependent on such devices for medical monitoring, this mobile platform will have to become much more robust.

The other side that is not often brought in such discussions is that our personal lifestyle, much of which is, or certainly can be, connected with our mobile platform, has an effect on our health. These should be integrated with the explicit health monitoring.

On such example is diabetes. It is very much connected to what, how much, and when, we eat. At the moment there's mobile apps such as 'Calorie Counter' where food intake can be logged and totaled. Restaurants often have online menus. All this can be integrated, such that what you order, portion size, etc, with medication dose and timing, along with real time glucose monitoring.

Life style, medical monitoring and record keeping should be integrated. Intelligent software monitoring can both alert the user, as well as medical staff, routine as well as urgent, situations.

rick merritt
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Re: Doctors and Technology
rick merritt   11/14/2013 7:57:07 PM
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There are tons of cool devices in the works now. The bottleneck is the docs don't know what to do with all the data. New devices, old procedures.

R_Colin_Johnson
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Re: Doctors and Technology
R_Colin_Johnson   11/14/2013 12:20:51 PM
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@Bert22306 this sort of innovation should put individuals more in charge of themselves

You are right--the more we understand our own health condition, the more we can take charge of our own therapies, hopefully preventing problems before they become critical, rather than just jump on the bandwagon of the latest trend to deal with health problems after they pass the critical threshold.

Patk0317
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Re: BP
Patk0317   11/14/2013 10:31:48 AM
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BP is a good one. You can get a number of measurements form a pulse oximeter, including heart rate and even detect abnormal heart beats

elven8
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FIT sensor
elven8   11/14/2013 10:23:48 AM
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Maxim Integrated has collaborated on a similar wearable sensor.

http://www.clearbridgevitalsigns.com/

I can see a lot of potential for realtime health monitoring.

coolio0
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BP
coolio0   11/14/2013 10:05:52 AM
How about BP measurement via a plaster sensor ? Not much point checking the heart rate without BP value really.

DrQuine
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Re: Doctors and Technology
DrQuine   11/13/2013 8:26:25 PM
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If only we could persuade the health care industry to keep the data that they gather at such great expense and personal inconvenience. After coughing up an extra 50% for my eye exams to obtain retinal images to track any progressive damage through time, I was shocked when I contacted my eye doctor for an appointment after 5 years without any problems and was told that my medical records had been shredded because they were old. In my humble opinion, as long as we are alive our medical records should be kept intact. After we're gone, disposition of the records can be discussed (medical insights for our descendents) and debated (privacy and cost).

Caleb Kraft
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Re: Doctors and Technology
Caleb Kraft   11/13/2013 4:56:53 PM
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absolutely. There's a huge gap between what the medical industry is using and what is pheasible in terms of technology. Most that I've met with are having trouble with basic computer knowledge and are frankly scared of anything too new.

Bert22306
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Re: Doctors and Technology
Bert22306   11/13/2013 4:06:23 PM
The more of this sort of innovation the better. Not for doctors, but for individuals.

Just today I read in the paper that tere's a new recommendation coming out that will double the number of people who will be coerced into taking cholesterol drugs like lipitor, to a whopping 1/3 of the population. That's freakin' insane. They keep lowering the threshold of high-drama antics, to scare their patients into becoming the infinite revenue stream for drug companies.

So, this sort of innovation should put individuals more in charge of themselves. I'm all for it.

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