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Caleb Kraft
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Re: Metal printing
Caleb Kraft   11/21/2013 5:00:55 PM
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You should be skeptical! This is the beginning, the infancy of these technologies. They need skeptical people to drive them forward to solve the exact issues you've brought up!

Caleb Kraft
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Re: Metal printing
Caleb Kraft   11/21/2013 4:53:29 PM
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First, you have to be capable of imagining where a rapid prototyping machine has its strong points. Obviously you aren't going to spend 2,000 for the ability to print a chair to sit on. However, if you were someone who designed chairs regularly, 2000 might be a small cost to be able to spit out a computer modeled prototype right there in your home at a fraction of the cost of a prototype house.

 

I personally use mine for custom attachments to gaming controllers for people who have physical disabilities. The cost to print one (that is actually usable) is nothing compared to the thought of tooling and minimum orders.


There is TONS of hype out there. However, there are also legitimitely great things happening as well.

Max The Magnificent
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Re: Metal printing
Max The Magnificent   11/19/2013 3:13:19 PM
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@David: I so need to win the lotto......

That's certainly the only way I'm going to be able to afford all the cool things I want to play with :-)

David Ashton
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Re: Metal printing
David Ashton   11/19/2013 3:09:18 PM
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@Max...re lathes...a friend of mine had a Myford ML7 (3.5" swing, 20" bed) which I spent many happy hours playing on (and did some useful stuff!)    For really small stuff (less than 2'' x about 5" or 6") there was a thing called the Emco Unimat.  But both are expensive - I saw a Myford for $1250 on Ebay and a Unimat for $500+.  I guess there are other things these days, with CNC no doubt.    I so need to win the lotto......

Max The Magnificent
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Re: Metal printing
Max The Magnificent   11/19/2013 11:38:34 AM
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@David: I think for the money involved I'd rather get a small metal lathe and some other tools....

I must admit that I'm becoming more and more tempted by the idea of a small lathe and a small milling machine...

Max The Magnificent
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Re: Metal printing
Max The Magnificent   11/19/2013 11:37:31 AM
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@David: ...so how much did THAT cost?

Since it keeps me out if trouble, my wife thinks it's worth every penny :-)

David Ashton
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Firing the "clay"
David Ashton   11/19/2013 4:39:57 AM
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I wonder if inductive heating could be used rather than a kiln?  It would depend on how conductive his "clay" is ??

David Ashton
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Re: Metal printing
David Ashton   11/19/2013 4:37:31 AM
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@Max... "Well, I have a ceramic kiln sitting on my back deck..."  so how much did THAT cost?

To be honest the things he produced looked fairly crude...those gears have a LOT of play....but one of his stated objectives is to refine the process.

I think for the money involved I'd rather get a small metal lathe and some other tools....

 

Max The Magnificent
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Re: Metal printing
Max The Magnificent   11/18/2013 3:58:29 PM
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@krisi: ...do you really expect me to design my own chair and print it at home for few thousands dollars?

Who have you been talking to? No one expects you to design your own chair. Settle down. Take a "Chill Pill" and relax in your store-bought massage chair (LOL)

Max The Magnificent
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Re: Metal printing
Max The Magnificent   11/18/2013 3:52:04 PM
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@Jayna: How much will the kiln (mentioned so casually in the article, and not at all in the video) cost?

Well, I have a ceramic kiln sitting on my back deck that reaches liquid glass temperatures, so I guess I could use that :-)

 

 

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