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junko.yoshida
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Re: Rabble rouser
junko.yoshida   11/26/2013 2:12:54 AM
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Antony, thanks for the headsup. Much appreciate it. It's clear that this thing is far from over...

Antony Anderson
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Rookie
Re: Rabble rouser
Antony Anderson   11/25/2013 9:49:29 AM
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Junko, you write:

"We do strive to write things beyond what vendors want us to report."

Here is the latest example of low speed "electronic disobedience" in a 2003 Camry:

Brockton crash leaves city man shaken Enterprise News.

According to the reporter, "Brockton police who investigated said the accident was not a result of operator error".

http://www.enterprisenews.com/topstories/x1069226453/Brockton-crash-leaves-city-man-shaken

 
 

 

 

 

 

junko.yoshida
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Rabble rouser
junko.yoshida   11/24/2013 10:02:16 AM
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@Parris Boyd, thank you for your kind words. 

We do strive to write things beyond what vendors want us to report...

Parris Boyd
User Rank
Manager
Re: Rabble rouser
Parris Boyd   11/23/2013 11:26:14 AM
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Just wanna commend Junko Yoshida and EE Times for the FANTASTIC reporting regarding Toyota's problems with sudden unintended acceleration. SO refreshing to see a bit of bonafide journalism. RIGHT ON!!!

junko.yoshida
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Blogger
Re: Rabble rouser
junko.yoshida   11/22/2013 8:21:30 PM
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Wow, Anthony, great that you track down Mr. Kuroyanagi's patents. Sort of stuff I should have done. Good detective work. In other words, what you are inferring here is that he is no spring chicken. He knows the field inside and out. And yet, he is not able to talk because this thing is now just waaaaay to sensitive for anyone to make comments.

I agree. I thought his no comment spoke volume.

Antony Anderson
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Rookie
Re: Rabble rouser
Antony Anderson   11/22/2013 8:11:53 PM
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Actually, after his keynote, I immediately left the auditorium ......But in an elevator, I had second thoughts.

Truly inspired second-thoughtfulness..... Evidently timed to perfection... Good for you Junko! It sounds from your description of his body language as if Mr Shigeru Kuroyanagi had a SEU (Single Event Upset) for which he was unprepared. It will be interesting to see what the ripple effect may be within Toyota.

Mr Kuroyanagi's  comment that  "I absolutely have no comments" should be noted. Here speaks a man with at least 30 years experience of automobile electronic development in Toyota ( His first US patent was USP 4841447 (June 20th 1989))  Every non-comment of his is clearly pregnant with meaning of some kind.

He may not have answered your question, but, by not answering, he may be telling us in code that a post-Bookout Toyota Motor Company will no longer be hiding behind the pedal error hypothesis or flying floormats or sticky pedals as explanations for sudden acceleration. We shall see...

 

 

 

 

junko.yoshida
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Rabble rouser
junko.yoshida   11/22/2013 3:12:58 PM
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@daleste, agreed. In an ideal world, we would like to see engineers from different companies comparing notes and sharing some ideas.

That may be happening more in a private setting, however.

Meanwhile, I attended a fascinating panel where people discussed automotive hacking issues. But again, nobody wanted to talk about the "real" hacking experiences. More on that later.

junko.yoshida
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Rabble rouser
junko.yoshida   11/22/2013 3:09:42 PM
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Ha, ha! Exactly. Actually, after his keynote, I immediately left the autditorium (while thinking that he wouldn't probably say anything even if I asked him questions). But in an elevator, I had second thoughts. What am I, if I didn't ask him a question, after coming to Japan all the way from the US? I reminded myself of the rule number one for reporters: Never assume anything.

So, I took an elevator up, back to the auditorium, and cornered him.

 

 

Sheetal.Pandey
User Rank
Manager
Re: Rabble rouser
Sheetal.Pandey   11/22/2013 8:39:42 AM
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"To achieve a goal of autonomous cars in 100%, you need a holy trinity of man, car, and traffic environment. All three need to work in harmony, and that's hard to accomplish 100%, especially when you need to drive a car under all weather and road conditions and you share a road with cars that are not autonomous"

So much agree. For autonomous cars to be successful there has to be the perfect condition of three factors listed above as we see in car racing video games. But in practical conditions its never perfect. When in country like Japan these things are not viable how about the rest of the world. I guess many places in Europe may work out for autonomous cars.

AZskibum
User Rank
CEO
Re: Rabble rouser
AZskibum   11/22/2013 2:46:21 AM
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After my rabble rouser comment, I almost said "I know you didn't really expect him to answer, but it's your job to ask!"

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