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junko.yoshida
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Blogger
Bold decisions
junko.yoshida   11/22/2013 5:37:23 PM
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Drue, thanks for your contribution here. The results of your trial described here are quite interesting. Now that you are proposing both carmakers and government to take bold decisions (which I agree whole heartedly), what needs to get done to talk them into actually taking 'bold decisions'? What's still missing in your opinion?

jnissen
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Manager
No Thanks
jnissen   11/22/2013 7:34:08 PM
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While this sounds so great to network vehicles to extract every experience with a pothole, red light and use of the brakes the downside was never given. Privacy or lack of any semblence of privacy specifically. If you want someone to know where you drove, how far, etc... then this would be the way.

Who would use this data? I bet the same political hacks that propose taxing us based on miles driven are the ones who would help fund this. I can only immagine future taxes for agressive driving or liberal use of a gas pedal. How about an extra tax because I applied the brakes more than I should have. No thanks - leave me out of it.

junko.yoshida
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Blogger
Re: No Thanks
junko.yoshida   11/22/2013 8:17:19 PM
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@jnissen, privacy and security will always be a big issue  (and to an extent, a big business) when anyone starts collecting data. Who will own the data; who get to access that data; how they will use that data, etc. etc.

That said, kinds of data the author is talking about is more to do with building vehicle-to-infrastructure communication. I was recently talking to a Japanese automotive industry source. When the earthquake and tsunami hit Japan on March, 2011, for a long time, people had NO idea which roads were open or disrupted -- largely because there was no "crow-sourced" data.

Not knowing information on the road conditions was very problematic, because that means they couldn't figure out routes they should take to deliver emergency goods -- water, food, gas, etc.

It took the Japanese indsutry several weeks to get its act together, but eventually, they collected GPS data from various vehicles, combined with any additional data from various On-star like services. They laid out the information on Google Map and created a whole new useful map online for anyone to use -- in terms of which roads to take.

That, my friend, is not a bad example illustrating the advantage of crowd-sourcing the data.

prabhakar_deosthali
User Rank
CEO
Re:
prabhakar_deosthali   11/23/2013 12:55:53 AM
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In my opinion, the big investments required to implement Big data Analytics and roadside infrastructure can be paid off by the reduced fuel consumption, reduced no of accidents and the asscoated traffic jams, reduced time to travel and less stress and some kind a peace of mind for those long distance taxi and truck drivers

 

_hm
User Rank
CEO
Re: No Thanks
_hm   11/23/2013 9:38:36 AM
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@Nissen: I too concur with you. There are very important legan and privacy aspect to be resolved before this becomes reality.

I may think that, to keep privacy and drive freely, one should preserve their vintage cars. They may not be forced to have these advance system and can used freely.

 

Sanjib.A
User Rank
CEO
Re:
Sanjib.A   11/24/2013 12:26:15 PM
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I agree with you. It might be beneficial for the countries, regions where the majority of the population depends more on long drives and the infrastructure is ready to draw the benefits of this or there is a good support from the governments. For the developing countries, this may be distant dream. But I see an increasing trend of using GPS services in India already.

Drue Freeman
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Blogger
Re: Bold decisions
Drue Freeman   11/24/2013 2:00:45 PM
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Hi Junko, I think the most important decisions will be for a few local or state governments to just get started with some Day-One V2I use cases requiring limited investment in infrastructure and for a few car OEMs to make the communications platforms available in those brands or models where technology and safety are seen as attractive differentiators.  For example, signal phase & traffic light timing, in-vehicle signage, road-works warnings, and vehicle data probing (which is what I talked about in the blog, and which can be of great use to the insurance industry).  A great positive example of this "just go out and do it" approach is the ITS Corridor being developed in Europe between the Netherlands, Germany and Austria.  Several car brands will equip their cars with the necessary  802.11p hardware to enable this corridor to provide benefits to those drivers who have these cars.  To the rest, it will be a "don't care" at first.  But, over time, as more cars become equipped, it will make economic sense for there to be greater investment in infrastructure beyond the corridor, and also the V2V use cases will become increasingly more practical, which will unlock the real societal benefits of reducing congestion and saving lives.   These first decisions would be great way to get the fly-wheel turning.

Drue Freeman
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Blogger
Re: No Thanks
Drue Freeman   11/24/2013 2:06:31 PM
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@jnissen:  If you are worried about maintaining your privacy about where you are driving, I trust you are not driving around with a mobile phone in your car... 

We have much less privacy than we realize already.  Why not allow an anonymous aggregation across thousands of vehicles to provide more useful information to increase traffic efficiency and safety?  By adding security in the form of encryption technology, we can actually do a lot to ensure the data only flows into the hands of the people authorized to receive it and that it be used for the intended purposes.  Personally, I wouldn't mind giving my insurance company access to my driving patterns as I believe it would shift me into a much lower risk pool (we all believe we are better than average drivers ;-) ) and would save me a lot of money on car insurance.  On the other hand, if you prefer to drive aggressively, you could always choose to opt out of such an insurance program. Though such a decision would probably put you in a higher risk pool.

junko.yoshida
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Bold decisions
junko.yoshida   11/25/2013 9:06:55 AM
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@Drue, thanks for chiming in. 

You wrote:

A great positive example of this "just go out and do it" approach is the ITS Corridor being developed in Europe between the Netherlands, Germany and Austria. 

Now, that's interesting. I am going to ping you to explore this further. Thanks for the tip!

Tim W
User Rank
Manager
Re: Bold decisions
Tim W   11/25/2013 11:36:20 AM
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Aside from the big brother back-seat driver issue, connected cars won't do much good for places where there is no good cellular service.  (And big brother might have trouble communicating when a needle finds it's way through the antenna's coax...)

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