Embedded Systems Conference
Breaking News
Comments
Newest First | Oldest First | Threaded View
chipmonk0
User Rank
Author
Re: Heat removal
chipmonk0   2/14/2014 4:11:51 PM
NO RATINGS
There seems to be some usual confusion going on here between 3-d stacking of dice ea. first processed separately on separate wafers to build device ( the original question by Lasheras ) and devices built one on top of another on the same wafer ( in the response by Zvi ).

in the first case the thermally conductive Cu used to fill the through vias can aid vertical heat dispersal but not completely since they also introduce stress if placed too close to the transistors. the TSVs do nothing to directly aid lateral heat dispersal. IBM / 3M and a few others are working on this part as local heat build up impacts memory refresh times.

For the second config. of 3-d, which Zvi has been championing for a while, what are the vias between transistors built one on top of another made of ? Copper or still much less conductive Tungsten ? Samsung's 3-d NAND sticks to usual CVD W. But as Zvi says, the heat transfer distances are within microns and so the fluxes could be acceptable even with vias filled with CVD W which has a k just a quarter of Cu.

Or_Bach
User Rank
Author
Heat removal
Or_Bach   2/14/2014 3:45:21 PM
NO RATINGS
Yes, copper is a good heat conductor and there is a general need to have a good power delivery which imply use of thick copper wires across the device with many vias to spread the power across the device. 

In monolithic 3D we can have many vias which provides good heat transfer from the inner transistors layers to the device heat-sink. And the very thin layers of monolithic 3D means that the distance from where the heat is being generated to where it could dissipate is only few microns. Accordingly the power-distribution-network could be used to effectively removed the inner heat.

It should be noted that monolithic 3D is most effective way to reduce the overall heat generated in IC device as it significantly reduce the average interconnect length.

 

Garcia-Lasheras
User Rank
Author
Re: Heat Removal from monolithic 3D IC device
Garcia-Lasheras   2/14/2014 3:17:18 PM
NO RATINGS
Or_Bach: "the heat could be very effectively be removed using the power distribution network (PDN)"

Thank you very much for this valious update. The blog you are pointing out is really interesting. So, you reuse the Power Distribution Network in the same way some heat sinks use heat pipes -- but immersed into the "dice". Is this right?

Max The Magnificent
User Rank
Author
Re: Heat Removal from monolithic 3D IC device
Max The Magnificent   2/14/2014 11:54:40 AM
NO RATINGS
@Or_Bach: In IEDM 2012 we had published joint work with Stanford University showing that the heat could be very effectively be removed...

Great feedback Zvi, thanks for responding so quickly

Or_Bach
User Rank
Author
Heat Removal from monolithic 3D IC device
Or_Bach   2/14/2014 11:48:27 AM
NO RATINGS
Heat removal is a known issue and important one. The advantage of the monolithic 3D stacked device is that all upper layers are thin and not too far from the base wafer bulk or from the upper surface of the device. In IEDM 2012 we had published joint work with Stanford University showing that the heat could be very effectively be removed using the power distribution network (PDN). The work was also covered by a follow on blog: http://www.monolithic3d.com/2/post/2012/12/can-heat-be-removed-from-3d-ic-stacks.html

Max The Magnificent
User Rank
Author
Re: Thermal issues on 3D ICs
Max The Magnificent   2/14/2014 11:13:59 AM
NO RATINGS
@Garcia: One of the main issues with 3D ICs is how to get rid of the extra heat that is produced inside the "dice". I've heard that a very promising alternative is embedding active cooling devices into the IC -- e.g. Peltier towers. Do you have any clue about this?

Sadly not -- but I'm sure the folks at MonolithicIC3D do. I will "ping" them and ask them to comment here.

Garcia-Lasheras
User Rank
Author
Thermal issues on 3D ICs
Garcia-Lasheras   2/14/2014 11:07:50 AM
NO RATINGS
This is a very interesting column, Max. Your explanation about the physical processes involved in building this kind of 3D ICs is very clear and enlightening.

But I've a question for you. One of the main issues with 3D ICs is how to get rid of the extra heat that is produced inside the "dice". I've heard that a very promising alternative is embedding active cooling devices into the IC -- e.g. Peltier towers. Do you have any clue about this?

Max The Magnificent
User Rank
Author
Re: If this technology becomes mainstream...
Max The Magnificent   1/16/2014 11:24:53 AM
@rahul28feb: i have some brief information about the 3D ICs market...

Wonderful -- thanks for sharing

Max The Magnificent
User Rank
Author
If this technology becomes mainstream...
Max The Magnificent   12/2/2013 3:02:12 PM
If this technology eventually becomes mainstream, it will really change things -- this truly is a 3D IC technology -- I'd love to hear from someone who has used it to make a real chip...



Radio
LATEST ARCHIVED BROADCAST
Overview: Battle-hardened veterans of the electronics industry have heard of the “connected car” so often that they assume it’s a done deal. But do we really know what it takes to get a car connected and what its future entails? Join EE Times editor Junko Yoshida as she moderates a panel of movers and shakers in the connected car business. Executives from Cisco, Siemens and NXP will share ideas, plans and hopes for connected cars and their future. After the first 30 minutes of the radio show, our listeners will have the opportunity to ask questions via live online chat.
Flash Poll
Like Us on Facebook

Datasheets.com Parts Search

185 million searchable parts
(please enter a part number or hit search to begin)
Special Video Section
LED lighting is an important feature in today’s and future ...
Active balancing of series connected battery stacks exists ...
After a four-year absence, Infineon returns to Mobile World ...
A laptop’s 65-watt adapter can be made 6 times smaller and ...
An industry network should have device and data security at ...
The LTC2975 is a four-channel PMBus Power System Manager ...
In this video, a new high speed CMOS output comparator ...
The LT8640 is a 42V, 5A synchronous step-down regulator ...
The LTC2000 high-speed DAC has low noise and excellent ...
How do you protect the load and ensure output continues to ...
General-purpose DACs have applications in instrumentation, ...
Linear Technology demonstrates its latest measurement ...
10:29
Demos from Maxim Integrated at Electronica 2014 show ...
Bosch CEO Stefan Finkbeiner shows off latest combo and ...
STMicroelectronics demoed this simple gesture control ...
Keysight shows you what signals lurk in real-time at 510MHz ...
TE Connectivity's clear-plastic, full-size model car shows ...
Why culture makes Linear Tech a winner.
Recently formed Architects of Modern Power consortium ...
Specially modified Corvette C7 Stingray responds to ex Indy ...