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balkrishna47
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Rookie
Life of a battery
balkrishna47   12/11/2013 12:45:49 AM
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 Thanks for selecting battery as a subject.I have been  desining battery chargers in industry( Lead Acid) since 1972 for Indian Railways and Post and Telegraph Department. What I learned is they can use the LA batteries for more than 10 years. They used singal cell units with every day maintainence. However what I heard for my car battery themaximum life as per the auto repairer is one to three years as per usage of the car. Sulphatation, high starting current demand  non tubular design and mobile use (Sunjected to acceleration in all direction) being the main problem.

I also heared about polymer conductor battery that has long life (may be now being used ih cell phones) But is there any varient in capacities comparable to lead acid batteries? 

AZskibum
User Rank
CEO
Re: Blog and Battery U
AZskibum   12/7/2013 1:01:10 PM
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Yes, Battery U is an excellent resource.

Ivan, although nuclear RTGs are not for mainstream applications, I hope you will incldue them in your discussion, for the benefit of we space junkies. I have read that the old standby Pu-238 is not the optimum choice for deep space vehicle RTGs and I'm curious about the pros & cons of different radioactive isotopes for RTG use.

I also find it fascinating that even after more than 36 years in space, the 487 watt (at launch) batteries on Voyager 1 are still producing about 250 watts.

DrFPGA
User Rank
Blogger
Blog and Battery U
DrFPGA   12/6/2013 12:39:52 PM
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Thanx for the excellent blog. Looking forward with anticipation to the rest. Also, thanx for the link to Battery U. Great resource.

OldOldEng
User Rank
Rookie
Nickel Iron battery
OldOldEng   12/6/2013 8:54:13 AM
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Also please include the Nickel Iron battery type.  I know it has not been used for a while, but may still be usefull due to it's long life.

David Ashton
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Baghdad Battery
David Ashton   12/5/2013 6:55:57 PM
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@Caleb....I'm sure there's lots of tech like this, but just consider Peltier effect - discovered in the 1830's, but only in widespread used these days for coolers etc (and rings, as you recently pointed out, though as you also pointed out this is the complimentary Seebeck effect (ie generating electricity form a temperature difference, rather than Peltier which is generating a temperature difference form a current?))

Max The Magnificent
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Blogger
Re: I'm guessing Atomic is out
Max The Magnificent   12/5/2013 5:43:33 PM
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@Caleb: Hydrogen cell! having a water powered robot would be incredibly fun to say...

Ooooh, Tasty!

Caleb Kraft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Baghdad Battery
Caleb Kraft   12/5/2013 5:36:07 PM
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makes you wonder what other tech has stumbled because we didn't have the accompanying technology to make it a necessity.

Caleb Kraft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: I'm guessing Atomic is out
Caleb Kraft   12/5/2013 5:35:01 PM
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Hydrogen cell! having a water powered robot would be incredibly fun to say regardless of the pain in the ass.

David Ashton
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Charging Batteries
David Ashton   12/5/2013 4:15:40 PM
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@Ivan...I use a lot of NiCds and actually made up a "rejuvenator" for them to zap them with a high current for a short time, discharge, then zap again.  I did this with a  555 and entered it for the 555 competition a couple of years ago, the circuit is here:

http://stn564.hackhut.com/files/downloads/2011/02/555-NiCd-Battery-Rejuvenator.pdf

Mixed success, some batteries can't be fixed, but on some it works a treat.  You need to put a battery on the rejvenator for an hour or two, then give it a full charge at the normal rate.  I have specified 2C zap (ie a current of twice the AH capacity of the battery) but you can go to 5C or more for stubborn ones.

I just use a high current supply (eg a PC Power supply) but you can also use a capacitor to give the "zap".  I prefer a high current supply as it gives a more sustained and controllable zap.

Crusty1
User Rank
CEO
Re: Charging Batteries
Crusty1   12/5/2013 4:06:15 PM
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@Rgarvin640:Yes we used to manually use the lab power pack to step up the current to a dead NiCad untill the voltage started to drop and then discharge with a short, some times it would blow the short.

I have a lot of tales about battery use in London Underground Trains and before they were sold off Bus batteries.

I love the single cell lead acid batteries we used on the battery locomotives used to maintain track. They were very big 3 foot high an 1 foot deep float charged from the track 660 V DC during the day.

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