Breaking News
Comments
Newest First | Oldest First | Threaded View
Page 1 / 2   >   >>
rick merritt
User Rank
Author
Re: Emerging market?
rick merritt   12/24/2013 11:36:37 AM
NO RATINGS
@KB3001: Indeed Intel's multi hundred dollar Xeon processors may someday be a thing of the past (at least in volume servers) with the advent of multiple players selling integrated chips for the low tens of dollars

selinz
User Rank
Author
Re: Storage controllers, etc
selinz   12/23/2013 2:14:37 PM
NO RATINGS
It's tough to be a little guy and expect the big guys to adopt your proprietary technology.

jim.ballingall
User Rank
Author
Re: Emerging market?
jim.ballingall   12/21/2013 6:31:28 PM
NO RATINGS
There is definitely a market for non-Intel servers, as customers have long tired of the Intel monopoly. AMD's x86 has fallen far behind, remarkably leaving ARM's licensees as the most viable contenders. But, there is no need for a 32-bit server in China or anywhere else. It was the only ARM ISA available when Calxeda got started, but it could never live as a product, so was at best a proof-of-concept, stepping stone to 64-bit. We will start to see ARM 64-bit servers emerge slowly in 2014, but too slowly for a company like Calxeda, that has to survive solely on that ramp. The needs of the server market are changing too, where Intel's historical strength of single thread performance is not a must-have for many of the new web server workloads. So, I see ARM eventually making a strong business in severs, but, yes, it is all about software, and that will take time.  

KB3001
User Rank
Author
Re: Emerging market?
KB3001   12/21/2013 8:09:32 AM
NO RATINGS
You are challenging a perceived assertion with an assertion :) logic tells us that for LAMP servers, at least, custom SoC solutions based on ARM processors should perform better than Intel's on PPW. But even if we do not accept that, what about Performance Per Dollar? For the good of the end customer we need multiple providers. Intel's profit margins in the server market are ungodly and only competition can address that.

TarraTarra!
User Rank
Author
What about the Fabric?
TarraTarra!   12/20/2013 8:32:17 PM
NO RATINGS
Probably the most intriguing thing about Calxeda shutting down is what happened to the Fabric. To elaborate, Calxeda had two things that were innovative - one was the use of existing power efficient 32b cores from the mobile space and applying them to server workloads, but the second was the ability to connect a large set of such processors using their "scale-out" fabric interconnect. I always thought that was the more important part of their story and the distinguishing feature.

 

I can only speculate here:

- Maybe the big OEMs did not adopt Calxeda's fabric pretty much negating their advantage. I am not sure if the moon-shot from HP used their fabric. I suspect it did not.

- Did their fabric not provide the scalability or performance needed for large clusters

- Maybe proprietary fabrics are not welcome in the data-center and existing solutions are sufficient ( I dont see how though)

 

Sorry to see them go and they were definitely ahead of their time with some innovative ideas. Well fought Calxeda! Well fought!

TarraTarra!
User Rank
Author
Re: Emerging market?
TarraTarra!   12/20/2013 8:21:00 PM
NO RATINGS
For sure, HPC benchmarks will show that even though ARM is much better at the overall PPW metric, when it comes to solving large problems / large data operations, Intel still beats ARM-based processors in PPW metric

PPW is not the be-all and end-all. What matter is lowest power at good performance. Calxeda was able to demonstrate PPW benefit for static web-tier work-loads but what they probably found was that it was not a large enough market to justify a business case around.

But that is not to say that custom ARM 64b cores from AppliedMicro, Broadcom etc will come out with significantly better performing cores.

DMcCunney
User Rank
Author
Re: Emerging market?
DMcCunney   12/20/2013 7:53:13 PM
NO RATINGS
For sure, HPC benchmarks will show that even though ARM is much better at the overall PPW metric, when it comes to solving large problems / large data operations, Intel still beats ARM-based processors in PPW metric.

I think you're correct, and the server market won't be monolithic. Whether Intel architecture or ARM architecture will get the nod will depends upon the expected role of the server.   If what I want is a compute server, doing serious number crunching where I need results sooner rather than later, Intel may get the nod.  Likewise, if I'm doing something like hosting a large Oracle database where I have a terabyte of tables in RAM and I want the fastest possible performance on queries and updates, Intel may get the nod.

If I'm someone like Google or Facebook, building out data centers with thousands of servers where the key is distributed processing, no one server will carry a really heavy load, and time to complete any particular function is less critical, I may opt for power savings over raw performance.  As my load grows, I just add more servers, but more servers require more power, with increased costs for the power to run the servers, and the power run the cooling systems to keep the servers within an acceptable temperature range.

It will ultimately come down to money, and which approach offers the most bang for the buck, but what bang is will vary by customer and use case.


I expect a lot of amusement when 64 bit ARM CPUs start becoming available in quantity, with all manner of benchmarks purporting to show the superiority of one architecture over another.  The key questions will be "What do the benchmarks measure?" and "How relevant are particular numbers to the intended application?"

 

docdivakar
User Rank
Author
Re: Emerging market?
docdivakar   12/20/2013 7:20:09 PM
NO RATINGS
DMcCunney:  good analysis! I am of the opinion that the hype wagon went way before the horse in case of low power servers replacing Intel-based ones in the compute nodes. I remember seeing a demo of a 1RU server with 32 of the ARM processors last year where I challenged them to run Linpack BLAS C-version and compare with Intel-bases servers using Green500 power / watt (PPW) metric. Unfortunately I could not convince them to show the comparison! For sure, HPC benchmarks will show that even though ARM is much better at the overall PPW metric, when it comes to solving large problems / large data operations, Intel still beats ARM-based processors in PPW metric.

MP Divakar

 

DMcCunney
User Rank
Author
Re: Emerging market?
DMcCunney   12/20/2013 1:43:33 PM
NO RATINGS
I imagine that "emerging market" also includes geographically emerging market such as China.

You may assume that "emerging market" is "anywhere in the world where servers will be deployed in quantity."

China is a huge market, period, so it makes perfect sense that Calxeda execs should pay a visit to Beijing.  It would be a place to meet possible customers that might buy their solutions, and more important, to build essential relationships with the Chinese government to insure they were allowed to sell their products in China.

DMcCunney
User Rank
Author
Re: Storage controllers, etc
DMcCunney   12/20/2013 1:23:32 PM
NO RATINGS
@Goafrit. Indeed my "close the doors" language could be misleading.

The comnpoany just said "restructuring" which implies there could be a sale of its assets or some other outcome TBD.


An asset sale is one possibility.  An acquisition is another.  There's enough interest in 64 bit ARM servers that I can see another vendor buying Calxeda.  If I'm a player in the server space, and I want to offer 64 bit ARM based solutions, what do I do?  Do I build the capability from scratch, or do I look at acquiring someone who has already done it?


While Calxeda's existing products are 32 bit, you can assume a fair amount of engineering on the HW and SW sides that went into them will be applicable to 64 bit products as well,   I can see an outside interest in both Calxeda's IP, and its staff.


Page 1 / 2   >   >>


Datasheets.com Parts Search

185 million searchable parts
(please enter a part number or hit search to begin)
Radio
LATEST ARCHIVED BROADCAST

What are the engineering and design challenges in creating successful IoT devices? These devices are usually small, resource-constrained electronics designed to sense, collect, send, and/or interpret data. Some of the devices need to be smart enough to act upon data in real time, 24/7. Specifically the guests will discuss sensors, security, and lessons from IoT deployments.

Brought to you by:

Most Recent Comments
michigan0
 
SteveHarris0
 
realjjj
 
SteveHarris0
 
SteveHarris0
 
VicVat
 
Les_Slater
 
SSDWEM
 
witeken
Most Recent Messages
9/25/2016
4:48:30 PM
michigan0 Sang Kim First, 28nm bulk is in volume manufacturing for several years by the major semiconductor companies but not 28nm FDSOI today yet. Why not? Simply because unlike 28nm bulk the LDD(Lightly Doped Drain) to minimize hot carrier generation can't be implemented in 28nm FDSOI. Furthermore, hot carrier reliability becomes worse with scaling, That is the major reason why 28nm FDSOI is not manufacturable today and will not be. Second, how can you suppress the leakage currents from such ultra short 7nm due to the short channel effects? How thin SOI thickness is required to prevent punch-through of un-dopped 7nm FDSOI? Possibly less than 4nm. Depositing such an ultra thin film less then 4nm filum uniformly and reliably over 12" wafers at the manufacturing line is extremely difficult or not even manufacturable. If not manufacturable, the 7nm FDSOI debate is over!Third, what happens when hot carriers are generated near the drain at normal operation of 7nm FDSOI? Electrons go to the positively biased drain with no harm but where the holes to go? The holes can't go to the substrate because of the thin BOX layer. Some holes may become trapped at the BOX layer causing Vt shift. However, the vast majority of holes drift through the the un-dopped SOI channel toward the N+Source,...
Like Us on Facebook
Special Video Section
Once the base layer of a design has been taped out, making ...
In this short video we show an LED light demo to ...
The LTC2380-24 is a versatile 24-bit SAR ADC that combines ...
In this short video we show an LED light demo to ...
02:46
Wireless Power enables applications where it is difficult ...
07:41
LEDs are being used in current luxury model automotive ...
With design sizes expected to increase by 5X through 2020, ...
01:48
Linear Technology’s LT8330 and LT8331, two Low Quiescent ...
The quality and reliability of Mill-Max's two-piece ...
LED lighting is an important feature in today’s and future ...
05:27
The LT8602 has two high voltage buck regulators with an ...
05:18
Silego Technology’s highly versatile Mixed-signal GreenPAK ...
The quality and reliability of Mill-Max's two-piece ...
01:34
Why the multicopter? It has every thing in it. 58 of ...
Security is important in all parts of the IoT chain, ...
Infineon explains their philosophy and why the multicopter ...
The LTC4282 Hot SwapTM controller allows a board to be ...
This video highlights the Zynq® UltraScale+™ MPSoC, and sho...
Homeowners may soon be able to store the energy generated ...
The LTC®6363 is a low power, low noise, fully differential ...