Design Con 2015
Breaking News
Comments
Newest First | Oldest First | Threaded View
<<   <   Page 8 / 9   >   >>
wilber_xbox
User Rank
Manager
Re: The overpaid CEO
wilber_xbox   12/27/2013 10:50:44 AM
NO RATINGS
There is too much disparity in the salaries in US than Europe. I think that it has to do with rules and regulation. The same rules and regulations can be applied in US and i donot agree with those distractors that say the companies will loose out with competitors. I thinks the management in Europe is on par with US at a much lower cost.

David Ashton
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Greedy CEOs
David Ashton   12/27/2013 5:07:24 AM
NO RATINGS
@Rick - don't tempt me, I'd be the terror of greedy CEOs!  But I would do my best to be fair....

rick merritt
User Rank
Author
Re: Connect the dots
rick merritt   12/27/2013 4:03:02 AM
NO RATINGS
@AZskibum: Another good idea for a follow up: What are the CEO-to-Average worker ratios in semis or high tech in general?

rick merritt
User Rank
Author
Re: Greedy CEOs
rick merritt   12/27/2013 4:00:04 AM
NO RATINGS
@David Ashton: I nominate you for the SEC ;-)

rick merritt
User Rank
Author
Re: The overpaid CEO
rick merritt   12/27/2013 3:58:15 AM
NO RATINGS
@DMcCunney: You raise some excellent points.

I would love to see a future stories exploring CEOs behavior around their stock and options.

I'd also love to see stories exploring boards and compensation committees think. I don't pretend to understand it. But it doesn't feel well grounded to reality to me.

Is $10, $20, $100m compensation OK because other people do it?

Is it OK because the company has the money and no other pressing place to spend it?

Is it OK because its in the form of stock and options CEOs won't exercise for a while?

What about those CEOs that have nearly sunk copmanies and left with golden parachutes?

Methinks part of this phenom is cowardly boards with lemming behaviors rewarding executives that have more bravado than talent.

 

David Ashton
User Rank
Blogger
Greedy CEOs
David Ashton   12/26/2013 11:48:10 PM
NO RATINGS
A lot of good points here from all sides.  Yes, a good CEO is worth a lot, but how much is a lot?  and what is wrong with offering the workers stock options at the same rate per $ paid?  and if the company goes belly up, aren't the workers entitled to the same golden parachute protection that the CEO is (again proportional to their pay?)

I like Dr Marty's idea of voluntary reporting of metrics, but to overcome the greed of these guys I think a bit more stick is necessary.  Ratios between lowest / highest pay are a good idea and simple to implement.  As are enforcing CEO pay rises be no more than the workers get.  I recently got 2.5%,  around the inflation figure so does not mean much, after a long fight, with the union threatening industrial action.  Our CEO got 25% with no such struggle.   "How to demoralise your workforce: 101".

Ad D. McCunney says, it would be meaningless to distribute the CEO's excess to the workers.  But by mandating that all workers get the same stock options as the CEO, and putting that money towards the dividends, everyone has an incentive to do their best.   Carrots alone don't work with greedy CEO's, some stick is needed.

 

Dr Marty
User Rank
Rookie
You can't legislate morals
Dr Marty   12/26/2013 11:27:55 PM
NO RATINGS
I would rather see this question tackled in the context of Corporate Social Responsibility where organizations voluntarily publish key metrics. Examples could be the mode, median and mean salary of all employees with respect to that of the CEO (and executive team) but I'm sure there are probably other metrics too; or someone could even come up with an index that somehow munges all these metrics into a single figure that over time, would have some meaning. 

daleste
User Rank
CEO
Re: The overpaid CEO
daleste   12/26/2013 8:02:20 PM
NO RATINGS
Bert, I totally agree.  I wouldn't want the job, but I can't complain too much about their salary.  It does tend to be kind of like the government.  You have the board and CEO making the rules and voting themselves raises.  It is a gravy train until bad times, like when the company or country goes bankrupt.  Then they have their golden parachute and the little people suffer.

Bert22306
User Rank
CEO
Re: The overpaid CEO
Bert22306   12/26/2013 5:35:36 PM
Of course, board members tend to be top execs from other companies, also paid way more than the average worker, so it's not surprising that they scratch each others' backs.

Still, having the CEO of a company with ~100,000 employees or more paid a few hundred time more than the average worker means that it's not so much a question of his salary affecting negatively the workers' salaries. It's more a question of basic fairness, common sense, and you know, decency. Those intangibles.

I'd deteste doing their job, so I'm not envious by any means. A life of meetings, hustling, and gladhanding, doesn't sound appealing. I just don't want to hear them pontificating at me about ethics.

docdivakar
User Rank
CEO
Re: free and socially minded society?
docdivakar   12/26/2013 3:50:09 PM
NO RATINGS
I am also of the opinion that the compensation packages of the CEO's in public companies should not be legislated by any government at all. Instead, the shareholders have that right to exercise. To that end, the SEC's proposed requirement to list the ratio of CEO's vs. median salary of employees is a good idea that can provide feedbacks to any shareholder action.

MP Divakar

<<   <   Page 8 / 9   >   >>


Flash Poll
Top Comments of the Week
Like Us on Facebook
EE Times on Twitter
EE Times Twitter Feed

Datasheets.com Parts Search

185 million searchable parts
(please enter a part number or hit search to begin)
EE Life
Frankenstein's Fix, Teardowns, Sideshows, Design Contests, Reader Content & More
Max Maxfield

Book Review: Deadly Odds by Allen Wyler
Max Maxfield
11 comments
Generally speaking, when it comes to settling down with a good book, I tend to gravitate towards science fiction and science fantasy. Having said this, I do spend a lot of time reading ...

Martin Rowe

No 2014 Punkin Chunkin, What Will You Do?
Martin Rowe
1 Comment
American Thanksgiving is next week, and while some people watch (American) football all day, the real competition on TV has become Punkin Chunkin. But there will be no Punkin Chunkin on TV ...

Rich Quinnell

Making the Grade in Industrial Design
Rich Quinnell
14 comments
As every developer knows, there are the paper specifications for a product design, and then there are the real requirements. The paper specs are dry, bland, and rigidly numeric, making ...

Martin Rowe

Book Review: Controlling Radiated Emissions by Design
Martin Rowe
1 Comment
Controlling Radiated Emissions by Design, Third Edition, by Michel Mardiguian. Contributions by Donald L. Sweeney and Roger Swanberg. List price: $89.99 (e-book), $119 (hardcover).