Breaking News
Comments
Newest First | Oldest First | Threaded View
<<   <   Page 6 / 12   >   >>
KB3001
User Rank
CEO
Re: Not surprising really
KB3001   1/20/2014 10:21:22 AM
NO RATINGS
I thought the same Krisi but he was adamant. He did say it was just the cost of employment (excluding productivity). When I probed him further he said the state in France provide a lot of subsidies for employment and I believe that to be true.

krisi
User Rank
CEO
Re: Not surprising really
krisi   1/20/2014 10:07:36 AM
NO RATINGS
Engineer in China more expensive than in France?!? I find it hard to belive @KB3001...unless analysis includes effectiveness of the job being done

KB3001
User Rank
CEO
Re: Not surprising really
KB3001   1/19/2014 4:01:32 PM
NO RATINGS
I am not sure about Africa, Krisi, but Asia could definitely be a more expensive manufacturing base than the West in 40 years. Mind you it's not just about the money, there is also the availability of skilled labour, the rule of law etc. If you add everything together, I can well envisage a move back of manufacturing to the West in 40 years time.

PS. A French company CEO told me recently that China is now becoming more expensive than France to hire good Engineers for his company. This was based on a rigorous cost analysis according to him. I am seeing the gap reducing in my own line of business too. Manufacturing will ultimately follow.

krisi
User Rank
CEO
Re: Not surprising really
krisi   1/19/2014 1:58:29 PM
NO RATINGS
Sure, money moves around searching for the lowest cost...but why manufacturing would return to North America? you are not assuming that in 40 years people in Africa will be paid more so it would be cost effective to come back here?

LoserTriesAgain
User Rank
Rookie
Re: Engineers need a bit of cognitive psychology!
LoserTriesAgain   1/19/2014 11:47:12 AM
NO RATINGS
Lance,

 

Good points. The export of talent requirements has hit me hard. I'm in the 20+ catagory. The companies I have interviewed for leave me a distinct impression that they do not want to hire someone who needs a manager. I think this stems from their business model driven by the fact that they can offshore what they need and leave the management part up to them. State side it's phone calls and video conferences that get the job done. I think they have shot themselves in the foot.

-Joe

KB3001
User Rank
CEO
Re: Not surprising really
KB3001   1/19/2014 4:56:42 AM
NO RATINGS
Probably but fast forward 40 years later and it might just come back. Money moves around and investment will go for high cost to low cost places. It is globalisation...

RDC IP
User Rank
Freelancer
Self fulfilling Prophecy
RDC IP   1/18/2014 3:16:24 PM
The author is correct, US corporations have done this to themselves.  At some point in the 90's the corporations started outsourcing to the rest of the world.  Older employees were laid off or dumped because of their compensation.  The business schools taught the industry to hire experienced people only.  What this did was removed opportunity to train and develop new experienced workers.  So the US execs dumped and stomped on the older experience.  The middle of the work force found other jobs and of course no one in university would spend thousands on an education where there are no job opportunities.  So now the execs come crying there are no experienced people.  Well guess what, those same execs created this situation.  The older experienced people don't trust the execs after decimating their benefits over the years (can't blame them) and have settled into retirement and don't want to go back.  The middle tier of experience is just not there. The young tier won't get hired cause the execs don't want to pay to train them. On  top of this, those few in the middle tier have been taught not to stay at anyone company for longer than 5 to 7 years so they jump ship to get a big raise because the idiotic execs won't pay them to stay.  The fact is there is no free lunch.  If the execs want experience they need to pay for it and develop it.  However, there is no motivation to stay once you have that experience.  What the execs in the US got was a one time cost saving and the realization that they killed the next generation of experienced engineers.  Guess what executives, if there are no engineers in the US, there is no need for execs in the US, you just killed the next generation of US execs. 

gearhead63
User Rank
Rookie
Re: Engineers need a bit of cognitive psychology!
gearhead63   1/17/2014 12:39:51 PM
NO RATINGS
I live near Dallas, and have talked with several individuals with engineering degrees. Seems like a LOT of young (20-30's), fresh graduates can't find jobs because of not having experience. A couple of the older ones with years of experience have told me that they (all the EE's they worked with) lost  jobs a couple years ago, some were hired quickly and others still looking. Not many places want or can give these youngsters a chance and some training. It's really sad. I'm 50, and there are many places that don't even want to talk to me because of my age. Even though I may have the experience they're looking for. I don't get it. When I have hired people before, their age didn't come into play, their ability and attitude were the biggest deciding factors.

SiliconValleyEngineer
User Rank
Rookie
Re: Engineers need a bit of cognitive psychology!
SiliconValleyEngineer   1/16/2014 9:37:56 PM
NO RATINGS
What you are saying is what I saw exactly at major FPGA vendor A in 2011 as an "intern."

There were hardly anyone below age 35 at their Silicon Valley HQ in engineering.

In fact, I had one person in IT department who introduced me to a guy in my age group because as she told me, "This guy wants to have similar age group friends at the company, and can you see him?"

I ended up not really becoming friends with this person, but you will get the idea that the management shutting the door to NCGs in 2001 and outsourcing jobs to Malaysia and Canada had an effect of hollowing out/decimating the 20s to early 30s age group in engineering.

The CEO recently claimed to EE Times that they hired number of NCGs and experienced candidates in 2013, so maybe the demographics has changed somewhat by now, but I wonder what the hiring mix is.

This is one of the reason why I don't really plan to work for a corporation, and I rather economically struggle as a small business owner than wanting to work for these corporations in vain.

 

Melody Akins
User Rank
Rookie
Ham Radio and STEM engagement
Melody Akins   1/16/2014 9:16:42 PM
NO RATINGS
Hi :)


Amateur radio is a great hobby for the whole family. It engages folks on many levels, from the rag-chewers to the hardware geeks. Parents can spend a few hours a week with their kids, and in a few years we will have all the engineers we need.

88s

Melody

<<   <   Page 6 / 12   >   >>


Flash Poll
EE Life
Frankenstein's Fix, Teardowns, Sideshows, Design Contests, Reader Content & More
Engineer's Bookshelf
Caleb Kraft

The Martian: A Delightful Exploration of Math, Mars & Feces
Caleb Kraft
3 comments
To say that Andy Weir's The Martian is an exploration of math, Mars, and feces is a slight simplification. I doubt that the author would have any complaints, though.

The Engineering Life - Around the Web
Caleb Kraft

Surprise TOQ Teardown at EELive!
Caleb Kraft
Post a comment
This year, for EELive! I had a little surprise that I was quite eager to share. Qualcom had given us a TOQ smart watch in order to award someone a prize. We were given complete freedom to ...

Design Contests & Competitions
Caleb Kraft

Join The Balancing Act With April's Caption Contest
Caleb Kraft
54 comments
Sometimes it can feel like you're really performing in the big tent when presenting your hardware. This month's caption contest exemplifies this wonderfully.

Engineering Investigations
Caleb Kraft

Frankenstein's Fix: The Winners Announced!
Caleb Kraft
8 comments
The Frankenstein's Fix contest for the Tektronix Scope has finally officially come to an end. We had an incredibly amusing live chat earlier today to announce the winners. However, we ...

Top Comments of the Week
Like Us on Facebook
EE Times on Twitter
EE Times Twitter Feed

Datasheets.com Parts Search

185 million searchable parts
(please enter a part number or hit search to begin)