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modal
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Re: Ahh- the HP35
modal   1/17/2014 6:09:17 PM
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If you have an interest in the history of computing, check out IEEE's Annals of Computing History.

http://www.computer.org/portal/web/computingnow/annals


I'd be interested in more blog post from you on historical perspectives and also your FPGA experiecnes.

TonyTib
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HP Calculators
TonyTib   1/13/2014 12:27:41 PM
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My father had a HP-45 from work, which had the secret stopwatch mode.

The HP-35S is the only current HP worth buying; eventually I'll get one.

My current main calculators are a HP48G+ (which I bought used since I wanted a 4 line stack display) and a TI-89 -- both are very nice, and I still enjoy using them.


I still have a HP-41C with quad memory and some cool books (including HP-41 assembly language programming).  The HP-41C needs its zero key fixed; hopefully I'll get around to that sometime this year.  Once it's fixed, I haven't decided what I'll do with it.

My first calculator was a HP-34C; I learned to program on it.

 

rich.pell
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Re: Ahh- the HP35
rich.pell   1/13/2014 11:02:21 AM
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I still have (and use fairly regularly) an HP 41CV calculator.  I think it's been running on the same (alkaline) batteries now for at least 20 years and counting.

antedeluvian
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Re: Ahh- the HP35
antedeluvian   1/11/2014 8:19:46 AM
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David

@Antedeluvian, why don't you replace your NiCds in your 35,

I did, twice. But it was expensive. My career progressed to the point where I needed a programmer's calculator for all the binary<->hex<->numerical conversions and I ended up with a Casio for much less than the price of NiCds. The Casios have come and gone though- the HP35 still has a place of pride on my shelf. I now use the HP35s which does meet all my requirmements.

David Ashton
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Recollections??
David Ashton   1/11/2014 4:42:36 AM
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@Sven, in answer to your question, "Are you interested in my recollections...? my answer is a very definite YES.  However there will be others who will find your FPGA musings of greater interest.  So why not do both and keep everyone happy?

David Ashton
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Re: Ahh- the HP35
David Ashton   1/11/2014 4:33:59 AM
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@Sven, Antedeluvian, I used to have an HP-45, wish I still did. They are awesome calculators.  @Antedeluvian, why don't you replace your NiCds in your 35, I did in my 45 once and it was not difficult.

svenand
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Re: Ahh- the HP35
svenand   1/11/2014 3:04:56 AM
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No, I could never afford to buy one, but I went every day to the school's shop to try it out.

 

 

antedeluvian
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Ahh- the HP35
antedeluvian   1/10/2014 7:25:31 PM
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Sven

In 1972, HP introduced the world's first scientific pocket calculator -- the HP35. This cost $395, which was a completely unattainable sum for me at that time.

I remember the HP35 very fondly. I still have mine along with a book on how to implement algortithms. NiCds are shot, but it still works on the mains.

I attribute my BSEE to it- it gave me 30 minutes extra in exams while the others were shuffling their slide rules. Best investment I ever made!

When HP brought out the HP35s for its 30th anniversary, I just had to have one as well!



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