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Max The Magnificent
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Spatial Visualization
Max The Magnificent   1/31/2014 12:55:24 PM
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I'm thinking that "Cruella" simply couldn't wrap her brain around vizualizing the syringe being "upside down" (i.e., pointing upwards) -- by comparison, I think I have relatively good spatial and 3D visualizatiobn skills. Do you think this comes with being an engineer (or vice versa), or is it just a case of "some folks have it, and others don't"?

zeeglen
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Re: Spatial Visualization
zeeglen   1/31/2014 1:29:42 PM
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Just imagine if Cruella had been the one with diabetes - she would have definitely qualified for a Darwin Award.

What exactly is her job there?

Max The Magnificent
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Re: Spatial Visualization
Max The Magnificent   1/31/2014 2:01:55 PM
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@zeeglen: What exactly is her job there?

If I ever find out I'll let you know LOL

jjulian274
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Re: Spatial Visualization
jjulian274   2/6/2014 11:33:50 AM
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Max,

 

I hope I don't start something here, but I did hear once that being able to envision things spatially is a trait that is stronger in the human male than the female.  I forget what trait is stronger in the female, but there something comparable in their favor.

This is why mem TEND to be better with maps (I can read a map upside down and don't have to orient it a specific way), terrain following, and a general sense of direction (but I find this one is not as general as the others).


Notice, I am generalizing here and there are NO absolutes (so don't shoot).

Max The Magnificent
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Re: Spatial Visualization
Max The Magnificent   2/6/2014 11:46:50 AM
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@Jjulian: I hope I don't start something here, but I did hear once that being able to envision things spatially is a trait that is stronger in the human male than the female.

Oooooh -- you are a braver man than me LOL

DWILSON373
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Training of the Caregiver
DWILSON373   2/6/2014 12:24:13 PM
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I think this situation was the result of inadequate assessment of "Cruella's" training.  The vet should have concluded the training with "Cruella" going through the process from loading the syringe through injecting the insulin to properly disposing of the used syringe.  The 'patient' should not have been returned to the care of "Cruella" until she was proficient in this aspect of being a caregiver.  "Cruella" may have seen the insulin level at 18 units but did not notice the plunger was at the 18 units and the syringe was filled with liquid.  Your contradiction of her recollection had her totally tuning out your explaination.  She would only have listened to the vet or someone she recognized as knowledgeable in the medical field.

Next time, wear a lab coat with your name embroidered on it and she'll believe every word you speak.

Max The Magnificent
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Re: Training of the Caregiver
Max The Magnificent   2/6/2014 12:33:20 PM
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@DWILSON373: Next time, wear a lab coat with your name embroidered on it and she'll believe every word you speak.

I have one on order in case I'm ever asked to play a doctor (or vet) on TV LOL

betajet
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18 mL or 1.8 mL or 0.18 mL?
betajet   1/31/2014 1:31:33 PM
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I once had a cat with diabetes, and I used the standard 1.0 mL syringes (or more likely 0.3 mL -- it's been a while) with a typical dose less than 0.1 mL IIRC.  So when I read 18 mL I immediately thought your friend was about to kill her dog with 10X or 100X the prescribed dose.  Kind of like confusing 20% blood alcohol content with 0.20%.


"How sharper than an insulin needle is the sting of a misplaced decimal point."


Max The Magnificent
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Re: 18 mL or 1.8 mL or 0.18 mL?
Max The Magnificent   1/31/2014 2:06:51 PM
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@betajet: I once had a cat with diabetes, and I used the standard 1.0 mL syringes (or more likely 0.3 mL -- it's been a while) with a typical dose less than 0.1 mL IIRC.

Hmmm, now I come to think that 1 liter is 1000ml, I can't believe that the syringe holds 100ml -- maybe it's 10ml or even 1ml (I doubt that "Cruella" will let me look) -- when I come to think about it -- insteal of 18uml, maybe she just said "18 of the divisions on this syringe" -- or maybe she did say "18ml" and I took her at her word without thinking it out -- but she definately meant 18 divisions on the syringe.

Also, it's a honking big dog LOL

 

Max The Magnificent
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Re: 18 mL or 1.8 mL or 0.18 mL?
Max The Magnificent   1/31/2014 2:08:08 PM
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@betajet: "How sharper than an insulin needle is the sting of a misplaced decimal point."


LOL I know I'm not going to be bending over whenever "Cruella" is in the vicinity :-)

David Ashton
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Aaaargghhh....
David Ashton   2/4/2014 2:56:37 PM
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This is such a simple mistake it almost beggars belief.    It raises questions about the quality of the educational system amongst other things.  I also wonder exactly how the vet showed her to fill the syringe.   Like Zeeglen I wonder what job she does, and how she got it......   I also wonder whether you will get an apology ever, because you almost certainly did save the dog's life.   I think "Cruella" is being a bit harsh, "Stupida" would be more fitting.....

Max The Magnificent
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Re: Aaaargghhh....
Max The Magnificent   2/6/2014 11:41:27 AM
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@David: It raises questions about the quality of the educational system amongst other things.

It's like they say: "Common sense isn;t as common as it used to be"

The thing is that I've come to realize that a lot of things I find easy and take for granted, many other people have trouble with. It doesn;t mean they are stupid, just that they have a different way of looking at the world.

David Ashton
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Re: Aaaargghhh....
David Ashton   2/6/2014 2:11:33 PM
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Had a beautiful and slightly similar one when I was at school.  A friend of mine whose folks were fairly well off regularly went boating at a nearby lake on weekends.  On one occasion the sister of his friend's girlfriend - who was known to be "a few sheep short in the top paddock" as the Australians say, remarked  "Gee, the lake is low, look how far that boat is out of the water!"    Peals of laughter from everyone present, but the poor girl couldn's see where she had gone wrong.  My friend was very patient.  "Ok, Debs, what happens if the water goes down another 3 feet.  Is the boat going to be in mid-air?"  The poor girl realised her mistake and went bright red....

Max The Magnificent
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Re: Aaaargghhh....
Max The Magnificent   2/6/2014 2:14:14 PM
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@David: Had a beautiful and slightly similar one when I was at school.

What are you talking about man?

David Ashton
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Re: Aaaargghhh....
David Ashton   2/6/2014 2:19:52 PM
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@Max....both incidents relate to liquid levels.....

Bert22306
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Impatient with cluelessness
Bert22306   2/4/2014 4:39:58 PM
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I too get impatient when confronted with incomprehensible cluelessness. I know that's a character flaw of mine, but it doesn't seem to change my reaction.

Recently, I was asked where you "plug in" an emergency generator. No, not to feed power to the house mains, but where you plug it in to make it run.

Then, when I explained that there is a gasoline engine that turns the electrical generator, I was asked whether you need to pull a cord to start them? As opposed to just turning a key? Well, it depends whether the generator also requires a battery, and whether that battery is kept charged for months or maybe years between use. The correlation between starting an engine by turning a key, and having to have a battery, was apparently a new revelation.

So, am I surprised that someone can't figure out how to measure the volume of a liquid? That seems way more complicated to me!

zeeglen
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Re: Impatient with cluelessness
zeeglen   2/4/2014 5:08:35 PM
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@Bert   I too get impatient when confronted with incomprehensible cluelessness

Good example!  And as David said it raises questions about the quality of education for even basic technical knowledge - a couple examples straight from Hollywood:

In the movie "Dolores Claiborne" there is a full moon one evening.  The very next day there is a total solar eclipse.  Duhhh

Remember the old TV series "The 6 Million Dollar Man"?  Even as I kid I got a good laugh when a woman was trying to start her car, the engine cranked healthily but no ignition.  The "hero" opened the hood and using his super strength fixed the problem by tightening the loose battery connector.

Max The Magnificent
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Re: Impatient with cluelessness
Max The Magnificent   2/6/2014 11:46:03 AM
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@zeeglen: Remember the old TV series "The 6 Million Dollar Man"?

The thing that always gave me pause for thought was that they had only replaced one of his legs, but he could still run at 100 miles an hour (or so) ... how did his flesh leg keep up? It would have made more sense (but not looked as cool) if he had hopped on his mechanical leg like a turbo-powered pogo stick LOL

David Ashton
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Re: Incomprehensible cluelessness
David Ashton   2/4/2014 5:28:48 PM
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@Bert.....similar feelings, and I feel you have to be patient with people like that - no one is perfect (not even me :-) and if you treat people like you would like to be treated, you can't go too far wrong.  I think Max did so in this case, and I guess superheroes can get their satisfaction from a job well done, even if they get no thanks. 

@Zeeglen - I am in awe of people who are so observant they pick up things like your examples.  In this month's caption comp, Betajet picked up that a real die would not have the 3 and the 4 on adjacent sides...  (sigh....there's so much to learn.... :-)

Max The Magnificent
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Re: Incomprehensible cluelessness
Max The Magnificent   2/6/2014 11:48:08 AM
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@David: ...no one is perfect (not even me :-)

It's like the old saying goes: "Those of you who think you are perfect only annoy those of us who are!"

Max The Magnificent
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Re: Impatient with cluelessness
Max The Magnificent   2/6/2014 11:43:27 AM
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@Bert22306: Recently, I was asked where you "plug in" an emergency generator.

LOL

 

BeALert
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Liquids in cars
BeALert   2/7/2014 3:25:56 AM
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The one that frustrates me the most is people who inexplicably believe that the "E" on a car's petrol/gas gauge means Empty and the "F" means Full – what would Full mean? One would have to know how big the tank is for Full to mean anything. Anyone who knows which corner of a steering wheel to hold knows that "E" means Enough and "F" means Finished. The little red line just before Enough is to warn you not to put any more in so that it doesn't explode. What I have learnt over the years is that if you have Enough in your tank, the car gets too heavy and just stops – you then have to take it somewhere for them to take some out and get it closer to Finished. The best is to keep it half way between Enough and Finished.

Max The Magnificent
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Re: Liquids in cars
Max The Magnificent   2/18/2014 11:15:26 AM
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@BeAlert: The best is to keep it half way between Enough and Finished.

LOL

Are you planning on attending EELive! 2014? If so, you owe us all a beer for the dreadful jokes LOL

BeALert
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Re: Liquids in cars
BeALert   2/19/2014 1:39:33 AM
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@Max The Magnificent: Are you planning on attending EELive! 2014? If so, you owe us all a beer for the dreadful jokes

I'd love to attend these kinds of events but being in South Africa it's rather difficult. In fact I believe that US immigration has a policy to cancel all interesting events the moment I apply for a visa – the few times I've been to America have been the most boring week of the year – event wise. We can compromise – I'll buy a crate of beer (the local stuff I'm guessing?), make my wife drink it all (I'll get her to wear a Hawaiian T-shirt) and tell her the worst jokes I know. You can do your part by slapping your hand against your forehead and groaning for about an hour.

Clive
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Re: Liquids in cars
Clive "Max" Maxfield   2/19/2014 8:44:38 AM
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@BeALert: You can do your part by slapping your hand against your forehead and groaning for about an hour.

Just tell me when to start LOL

FYI I already do this when my wife tells me a joke (assuming she can (a) remember the punchline and (b) get to the end of it without being reminded of something else and wandering off [conversation-wise] into the weeds :-)

Stargzer
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Re: Liquids in cars
Stargzer   3/14/2014 7:01:41 PM
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I always thought F stood for "Fill 'er up!"  Like P, R, N, D, L on the shift column:  Passing, Racing, Nothing, Drag racing, Losing. (Or P, R, N, D, 2, 1 on a 2000 Cougar:  Passing, Racing, Nothing, Drag racing, 2nd Place, 1st Place).

AZskibum
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Automated feeding of a diabetic pet
AZskibum   2/17/2014 9:58:26 AM
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Max, your post hit close to home because it reminded me of a dearly departed diabetic cat I had in the 80s. When we first learned he was diabetic, the vet gave us the usual spiel about how he needed twice a day insulin injections and needed to eat at specific times relative to those injections.

Since my wife & I both worked full time and the cat was home alone all day and needed to eat at specific times after his insulin shot, I decided to apply some engineering creativity to the problem of timing the diabetic cat's feedings. My solution was a simple digital controller, an electo-mechanical lamp timer with multiple on/off settings, an opto-isolator, a DC motor with a rubber wheel attached to its axle and a "lazy susan" mounted in a wooden box with a retractable lid that had a single food bowl-sized opening, complete with compartmentalized feed tray section for multiple feedings per day, each identified with a piece of cardboard attached to the lazy susan that would trip the optoisolator when it ran through the slot between emitter & detector.

I knew the motor would not reliably turn the lazy susan by X degrees per second every time. I also expected the cat(s) would mess with the mechanism from day one after realizing there was food stored inside. Either even could cause the motor's rubber wheel to slip and not rotate the lazy susan by the expected amount. The opto-isolator with the cardboard tabs hanging down from a few places on the lazy susan seemed a perfect solution -- the motor would turn on at the appointed time, and not turn off until the cardboard tab passed between the opto emitter & detector, however long it took for that to happen. When it finally did happen, the next bowl of food would appear beneath the slotted opening in the hinged lid of the the containing box.

The diabetic cat lived a full life for many years with the aid of this contraption, with me giving him an insulin shot every morning before work and every night when I got home, and like Pavlov's dogs, he quickly learned to associate the sound of the DC motor turning on with the imminent appearance of food under the opening in the lid of the wood box.

Thanks for the reminder of this pet from long ago!

 

Max The Magnificent
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Re: Automated feeding of a diabetic pet
Max The Magnificent   2/18/2014 11:18:46 AM
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@AZskkibum: Thanks for the reminder of this pet from long ago!

My pleasure -- FYI that feeder sounds like something others could use -- if you don;t want to commercialize it yourself (and if you still have it laying around), maybe you coudl take some pictures and write a short article on how to build it ... email me at max.maxfield@ubm.com if you're interested.



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