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Max The Magnificent
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Re: Powerful tool for memory management
Max The Magnificent   2/11/2014 1:27:26 PM
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@DrQuine: A debugging technique that I developed years ago was to surround my variables with some "0" buffer space.

Very clever!

MeasurementBlues
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Re: Getting used to it
MeasurementBlues   2/11/2014 1:24:57 PM
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"would you really want to create these using MS Paint?"

@Max, what's the problem? Piece of cake.

DrQuine
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Powerful tool for memory management
DrQuine   2/11/2014 1:19:09 PM
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"Memory leakage" and variables being written into unintended locations are common causes of programming problems. A debugging technique that I developed years ago was to surround my variables with some "0" buffer space. Viewing the memory on a display, I could see when data started to intrude into the white "snow" and attack my programming bug. It sounds like the Micriµm µC/Probe would be a powerful tool to monitor memory and provide an alert when variables overwrite program space or other variables.

DrQuine
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Re: Getting used to it
DrQuine   2/11/2014 1:12:09 PM
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Sometimes, moving into the future drives you backwards.  With many of the newer Microsoft Office applications, if you open a file directly, it is read-only and cannot be modified or saved.  It is necessary to open Word / Excel first and then open the file. "Progress."

zeeglen
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Re: Getting used to it
zeeglen   2/11/2014 12:57:26 PM
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@ Doug, Max - Yeah, I know, I was surprised too, but that's the way he's always done it...

I still remember doing prelim PCB floorplans by cutting out post-it notes to the same size as ICs and circuit block estimates, them arranging them on a paper until I got all the interconnections as short as possible.  Don't laugh - it got the job done :>}

MeasurementBlues
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Re: Getting used to it
MeasurementBlues   2/11/2014 12:28:00 PM
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I'd probably still use the OpenOffice draw program. It tracks yourmouse position and thus you can get quite accurate and repeatable drawings. I used it to design shelving in my house and to make room diagrams for placing furniture. You just ahd the translet thedistances on the drawing sinto physical distances but once I kniw the relationship, the rest was easy. It beat making paper mkodels of rooms and furniture, although that worked too.

Max The Magnificent
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Re: Getting used to it
Max The Magnificent   2/11/2014 12:04:07 PM
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@zeeglen: A colleague of mine creates timing diagrams using Excel...

He likes to suffer? Has he heard of Visio?

dougwithau
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Re: Getting used to it
dougwithau   2/11/2014 11:58:06 AM
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Timing diagrams in Excel. That seems a hard way to work. Have they seen this,

http://makezine.com/2007/11/29/timing-diagram-font/

A Font that makes timing diagrams. I used it in one document. It is actually pretty nice for a small diagram.

Is it Linear Tech that has a power supply design program. It is an Excel spread sheet and some macros to get the R and C values needed.

zeeglen
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Re: Getting used to it
zeeglen   2/11/2014 10:13:26 AM
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A colleague of mine creates timing diagrams using Excel - he turns the cell borders on/off to resemble logic waveforms.  Each mini-cell column size is a clock cycle.

Max The Magnificent
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Re: Getting used to it
Max The Magnificent   2/11/2014 9:53:15 AM
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@MeasurementBlues: As for me, I still do most of my graphics with Windows Paint.

Ah, but you are the exception that proves the rule LOL. Take a look at the diagrams I created for this article on 3D ICs -- would you really want to create these using MS Paint?

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