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krisi
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CEO
Re: Sad
krisi   3/7/2014 6:53:05 PM
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I love the joke @betajet!

daleste
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CEO
Re: Sad
daleste   3/3/2014 8:56:43 PM
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Good point.  Unless it is the government, then it takes a very large, expensive team to create a software product that is worthless.

Bert22306
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CEO
Re: Sad
Bert22306   3/3/2014 1:35:10 PM
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Years ago I read an article on the evolution of the modern office where they described how automation moves companies from large numbers of people with narrowly defined jobs to smaller numbers with broader responsibilities.

Very true. Especially true in manufacturing as it is now practiced in the West. Which is why more education is needed for most of the jobs in the future. Companies like Rockwell Autmation are creating the industrial machines that have displaced those narrowly focused factory jobs of the past. And of course, PCs have replaced the narrowly focused office jobs of the past as well.

LarryM99
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CEO
Re: Sad
LarryM99   3/3/2014 12:56:18 PM
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I think that we are in the midst of a fundamental change in how companies are organized, and the victims of that change are some of the large tech companies. Years ago I read an article on the evolution of the modern office where they described how automation moves companies from large numbers of people with narrowly defined jobs to smaller numbers with broader responsibilities. These smaller numbers are effective because of automation and commodization of the work that was previously done by many. Consider: Previously it took a giant like Sony to create consumer devices. Now small numbers of engineers can create them from standard parts. Previously it took companies like IBM to create significant software. Now a few dozen software engineers can create and deploy worldwide a product which the market values at $19B. That kind of change is going to cause ripples.

zewde yeraswork
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Blogger
Re: Sad
zewde yeraswork   3/3/2014 10:55:09 AM
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Yes, but I think the culture of the individual company and the place where one works has a lot tod o with things like that as well. Certainly places value there employees a lot more. And then there are conditions that are outside of the control of the company as well as the employee like the situation of the economy. Being laid off is not always a reflection of poor individual performance.

zewde yeraswork
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Where is the vision?
zewde yeraswork   3/3/2014 10:48:03 AM
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When are the execs ever the first to be fired? Not in the great depression and not today. Besides, things nowadays are much better than in times of crisis, especially the depression. But there is still a sense of uncertainty that permeates today's economy, like we're still not entirely in the clear, like the business community is still not overwhelmingly confident. IBM is an example of that problem right now.

_hm
User Rank
CEO
Re: Sad
_hm   3/2/2014 2:39:52 PM
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It indeed is sad. However, this is universal truth in making - everyday, everyweek, evaluate yourself for your work output and your remuneratio. If it differes above margin, you are in red and layoff may be imminent. It can be IBM or other organization.

 

Morris.Chen
User Rank
Rookie
It is going to happen everywhere.
Morris.Chen   3/1/2014 3:55:40 AM
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It is happening in Taiwan as well.

HS_SemiPro
User Rank
CEO
Re: Sad
HS_SemiPro   2/28/2014 11:07:50 PM
I worked for IBM STG for 5.5 years, 2006-2011, while I was there, there were 2 rounds of layoffs, 2007, 2009. 

Moral wasn't very good, while CEO got, $20 mill /year, employees were being laid off while company making ~$15B+  profit. And raises and bonus were minsicule in STG.

I left IBM and work for a  Asian company now, moral is good here,  They pay decent bonus every year.

 This company hasn't laid off a single year in their 20+ year of existence.

daleste
User Rank
CEO
Re: Sad
daleste   2/28/2014 8:05:16 PM
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I love the optimist joke.  Do they still wear white shirts?  My uncle was a computer salesman for IBM back when I was in school in the 70s and 80s.  They made a new title for him, Super Senior Salesman, because he was good at selling mainframes.  He retired in the 80s, so he missed all of the fun of changing the company.

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