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pseudoid
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Thinking SMALL is the BIG idea here
pseudoid   3/8/2014 4:47:43 PM
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I must be the odd man out in this conversation but I like the whole concept of modularity:  Heathkits were cool.  Separates in the audio industry was even better.  I helped rebuild a VW dune buggy and learned immensely from the process.  Building your own computer from components/hw was satisfying.  Gamers created a whole cottage industry and benefits of high end computer parts are still with us but almost on its last leg.  Even Arduino lovers can't be wrong.  Along the same lines, instead of the current throw-away smartphones that fill entire dumps, being able to upgrade incrementally, a la Project Ara, sounds nice but something tells me it will not get to a maturation state.  And too bad for that!

rick merritt
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Re: this is going nowhere
rick merritt   3/4/2014 1:17:11 PM
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@Caleb: Good point: At a time when the smartphone boiz is maturing and ASPs are falling, who will want to be a module supplier getting squeezed for margins?

Caleb Kraft
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Re: this is going nowhere
Caleb Kraft   3/3/2014 7:43:23 PM
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People keep mentioning the maker community. Why would they embrace this? Just because it has a customizeable system? There's not much here that does anything for any maker community out there.

AZskibum
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Re: this is going nowhere
AZskibum   3/3/2014 6:35:51 PM
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Although the maker community is likely to embrace this concept, the general consumer likely will not, due to the compromises mentioned -- less than optimal form factor at the very least.

rick merritt
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Re: this is going nowhere
rick merritt   3/3/2014 6:16:00 PM
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Doesn;t this raise issues about lack of optimization for a final product which as we learned with the iPhone is a big deal.

 

Caleb Kraft
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Re: this is going nowhere
Caleb Kraft   3/3/2014 2:44:59 PM
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Another question to ask is "why would a vendor put the effort into creating a module for Ara?" or rather "who will be making these modules?"


A vendor can sell a camera to many many product creators. However, if the vendor creates a camera module for Ara, it can only be used on the Ara market. Is google to going to make these extra modules? They're the only ones with incentive.

Caleb Kraft
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Re: this is going nowhere
Caleb Kraft   3/3/2014 2:37:35 PM
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The concept is cute, I do like it... as an exploratory concept.

 

In the cons list would be the physical size, producing a standardized connector for each device to attach, slower communication, crosstalk,etc.

junko.yoshida
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Re: It worked for MS and Intel
junko.yoshida   3/3/2014 1:30:19 PM
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@JimMcGregor, I am glad I am not the only one who finds it odd that Google has focused this toward smartphones. 

Where the innovaction is needed -- in terms of new apps, new modules, new functions, new end products -- is not smartphones; but in IoT and other embedded products. 

JimMcGregor
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Re: It worked for MS and Intel
JimMcGregor   3/3/2014 1:23:38 PM
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Junko, it is a bit odd that Google has focused this solely toward smartphones. When you factor in certifications and software compatibility, this just isn't a viable solution for a usable smartphone. However, I would agree that it does make an innovative development platform for IoT and embedded applications.

junko.yoshida
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Re: this is going nowhere
junko.yoshida   3/3/2014 1:22:31 PM
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@Caleb, what's on the list of your "cons" argument for this?

I had thought anyone who actually love tinkering with hardware would love the concept. No?

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