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junko.yoshida
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MTK's Hotknot strategy
junko.yoshida   3/12/2014 10:23:07 AM
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As a reporter I have covered NFC since its inception. I also remember covering Nokia's early implementation of NFC inside its handset in Europe in early 2000's.

I now see the tide changing big time. Gone is Nokia. How NFC will stay inside handsets will be interesting to watch.  

junko.yoshida
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Have you tried Hotknot yet?
junko.yoshida   3/12/2014 10:24:21 AM
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As a design engineer, has anybody tried Hotknot yet? I would love to hear your assessment.

jackOfManyTrades
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Obvious application?
jackOfManyTrades   3/12/2014 1:38:03 PM
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I see what seems to be an obvious application for this - swapping phone numbers and other contact info (rather than pictures of trees).

chanj0
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Differences of Hotknot and NFC
chanj0   3/12/2014 2:54:44 PM
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The video doesn't quite show what is the great features that Hotknot delivers while NFC couldn't. To me, it comes down to the choice between literally touch vs proximity. I prefer the latter that NFC delivers.


On the other hands, BLE is aiming the eWallet market as well. It might be interesting to compare all 3 techologies and rate their pros and cons.

tb100
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Re: Differences of Hotknot and NFC
tb100   3/12/2014 3:23:09 PM
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I assume that the advantage is cost, since you can use the touch interface that is already built into the phone. Power should be less too.

I think you'd have to get a lot closer, though, and the data rate is a lot slower.

Still, if it is practically free to add this to a phone, maybe more phones will have it in the future. One of the problems with NFC is that not every phone has it (especially iPhones, which are a significant portion of the market). It is hard to get traction with a 'swipe to pay' NFC system unless lots of people have a device that can be used.

junko.yoshida
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Re: Obvious application?
junko.yoshida   3/12/2014 5:53:44 PM
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@jackOfManyTrades, ha ha. Well put! I agree...

junko.yoshida
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Re: Differences of Hotknot and NFC
junko.yoshida   3/12/2014 5:56:54 PM
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@chanj, really? Bluetooth Low Energy is also gunning for eWallet? That's fascinating...  Then what is all coming down to is the issue of secure elements and which technology gets there first...

junko.yoshida
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Re: Differences of Hotknot and NFC
junko.yoshida   3/12/2014 6:12:37 PM
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@tb100, I agree. The genius of Hotknot is in the business model. If MTK can leverage its strong presence in touch controller ICs (through Goodix and Mstar), they might be able to proliferate this thing a lot faster -- at least, initially in China.

chanj0
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Re: Differences of Hotknot and NFC
chanj0   3/12/2014 6:18:04 PM
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For various reasons, people may not prefer having their phone, which gets close to their face, is touching someone else.

By the way, does the google barcode already resolve the issue of unpopularity of NFC?

The success of eWallet is heavily relying on the security and consumer confidence to the technology.

JimMcGregor
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Re: Differences of Hotknot and NFC
JimMcGregor   3/13/2014 2:28:00 PM
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Junko, I see the potential security aspect of this as being a key differentiator, especially for electronic transaction. Then combined with the cost and design simplicity, Hotknow has potential. The determining factor is adoption by the financial services industry. Thus far, the industry has been heavily divided. If any of the big players see value and adopt Hotknot, it could displace many NFC applications.

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