Breaking News
Comments
Newest First | Oldest First | Threaded View
<<   <   Page 5 / 10   >   >>
jjulian274
User Rank
Rookie
Re: My favorite movie trivia question
jjulian274   3/21/2014 4:26:36 PM
NO RATINGS
Hmmm, come to think of it, "Madame Chairthing" does have a certain ring to it; one couldn't mistakenly use "charwoman" and "chairwoman" if we used "chairthing."

I was just thinking about this this morning after hearing someone say congresswoman on the radio.  I think I prefer the term "critter", as in congresscritter, chaircritter, etc.

I think I like critter better than thing.  At least critter is somewhat of an animate object.  (Would Max REALLY want to use this in his book????)

Max The Magnificent
User Rank
Blogger
Re: My favorite movie trivia question
Max The Magnificent   3/21/2014 4:21:05 PM
NO RATINGS
@Stargzer: I speak bad enough to make a Parisian cry out in pain!

What more could one ask for? LOL

Max The Magnificent
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Ici on parle français
Max The Magnificent   3/21/2014 4:18:24 PM
NO RATINGS
@jjulian: ...are there too many commas in that sentence?

The thing about commas is that they are very subjective. As Ms Truss said, you can always argue that putting one in improves the clarity ... and you can always argue that taking it out improves the clarity LOL.

I know that the chapter on commas is going to be one of the harder chapters -- re your question (assuming you were serious), I personally would have removed one, so where you said:

Thank you for your kind offer, but, unfortunately, I won't be attending.

I would have written:

Thank you for your kind offer but, unfortunately, I won't be attending.

But a lot depends on how you would pause when saying it ... and how you want the reader to "hear" it in his or her head when he or she reads it (LOL).

Stargzer
User Rank
CEO
Re: My favorite movie trivia question
Stargzer   3/21/2014 4:17:00 PM
NO RATINGS
@betajet:  Ashley Wilkes was the one I was thinking of and I went to Wikipedia to verify Leslie Howard's name.  "Epic" was the first key. 

One of my father's Marine Corps buddies was Les (Leslie) Perry, who named his oldest daughter Lesley Ann Perry.  At least, I'm pretty sure of the two spellings.  I think Lesley was at one time the preferred spelling of the feminine, as in Lesley Ann Warren, but then, we also have Fr. Lesley J. McNair, Leslie Caron, Leslie Uggams, and Leslie Townes Hope (better known as Bob Hope). 

English does have a gender-neutral personal pronoun, similar to Latin:  it.  Unfortunately it's usually considered a bit impolite to refer to someone as "it" in English.  Hmmm, come to think of it, "Madame Chairthing" does have a certain ring to it; one couldn't mistakenly use "charwoman" and instead of "chairwoman" if we used "chairthing."  ;- )  Does Max want to add that to his book?

That said, I need to make a comment about the gender French nouns:  I'm not a native speaker (not much of a French speaker at all; I speak bad enough to make a Parisian cry out in pain!), but I do know that in French a victim is always feminine -- une victime, regardless of the actual gender of the person who is the victim.  Systranet.com translates "He is a victim" as "Il est une victime" where "une" is the feminine of "un" (the French word for English's "a" or "an").  Running "Il est une victime" back through from French to English produces "It is a victim."  "Il" in French can be translated as both "He" (masculine) and "It" (neuter) in English;  "Elle" is the feminine "She."  Latin was much easier for me to comprehend in high school than French because it had three genders, like English, rather than the two genders of French.  The trouble came in making sure that nouns, pronouns, and adjectives agreed in gender, case, and number.  Too many endings to remember! 

I think it was Mark Twain who said he'd met a student who would rather decline three beers and than one German noun.

 

Bert22306
User Rank
CEO
Re: gender blabla
Bert22306   3/21/2014 4:12:36 PM
NO RATINGS
You are joking, right? You mean that when you see "man" and "woman" ... it doesn't strike you that "woman" is derived from "man" ... sort of like saying "sort of man but a bit different."



Come now, Max. You're getting carried away. Are you suggesting we should change the word for "woman" to something like "framis," to make everyone happy? Even the word "woman" has become offensive?

betajet
User Rank
CEO
Re: Electrical English Department
betajet   3/21/2014 4:11:56 PM
NO RATINGS
Just take the time to re-read "Here Lies Miss Groby".  That will inspire you to get back to crucifying sentences in your MS.

Bert22306
User Rank
CEO
Re: Ici on parle français
Bert22306   3/21/2014 4:09:27 PM
NO RATINGS
This is true in English too. You can say, in a literal translation, "Here one speaks English." You can say, "English is spoken here." In Italian, "Si parla Italiano." So I don't think this gender-neutral "one" is unique to Spanish.

In German, the gender-neutral "one" is "man." Which does make me chuckle, in this context.

jjulian274
User Rank
Rookie
Re: Ici on parle français
jjulian274   3/21/2014 4:08:51 PM
NO RATINGS
Thank you for your kind offer, but, unfortunately, I won't be attending :( (are there too many commas in that sentence??)

 

I am hoping our paths will cross sometime as I feel I would enjoy that tremendously.

Take care keep the good times rolling.

Max The Magnificent
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Ici on parle français
Max The Magnificent   3/21/2014 4:06:02 PM
NO RATINGS
@Jjulian: I have a copy of Bebop and your computer math book and I can say I do enjoy your style.

You are very kind (I always wondered who had bought the only copy that sold LOL). Are you planning on attending EE Live!? If so, bring them along and I woudl be happy to autograph them for you.

 

Max The Magnificent
User Rank
Blogger
Re: gender blabla
Max The Magnificent   3/21/2014 4:04:05 PM
NO RATINGS
@Bert: That "man" in the word hardly implies male. Not in the word "woman," nor in any of the other overused examples.

You are joking, right? You mean that when you see "man" and "woman" ... it doesn't strike you that "woman" is derived from "man" ... sort of like saying "sort of man but a bit different."

I think the word man in anything -- like mankind or penmanship -- definately implies male. I understand that historically these words have been used to encompass everyone, but .... yes ... they DO imply male (sorry :-)

<<   <   Page 5 / 10   >   >>


Flash Poll
Top Comments of the Week
Like Us on Facebook
EE Times on Twitter
EE Times Twitter Feed

Datasheets.com Parts Search

185 million searchable parts
(please enter a part number or hit search to begin)
EE Life
Frankenstein's Fix, Teardowns, Sideshows, Design Contests, Reader Content & More
Max Maxfield

Feast Your Orbs on My Jiggly Exercise Machine
Max Maxfield
54 comments
Last weekend, I was chatting with my mother on the phone. She's all excited that I'm coming over to visit for a week in November. "I'll be seeing you in only seven weeks," she trilled ...

Glen Chenier

Missing Datasheet Details Can Cause Problems
Glen Chenier
3 comments
It is often said that "the devil is in the details." All too often those details are hidden deep within a datasheet, where you can easily overlook them. When a datasheet reference circuit ...

David Blaza

RadioShack: The End Is Nigh!
David Blaza
124 comments
I'm feeling a little nostalgic today as I read about what looks like the imminent demise of RadioShack, at least as we currently know it. An old ubiquitous cartoon image popped into my ...

Larry Desjardin

Engineers Should Study Finance: 5 Reasons Why
Larry Desjardin
47 comments
I'm a big proponent of engineers learning financial basics. Why? Because engineers are making decisions all the time, in multiple ways. Having a good financial understanding guides these ...