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krisi
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Re: Intel for IoT. Oh Really?
krisi   4/4/2014 6:18:00 PM
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I am noit sure ARM wil ever catch up to Qualcom valuation...somewhat different businesses...Qualcom is a wireless machine with some key IP that most of their competitors have to licence...in a high tech world there is no way to predict, perhaps tomorrow someone comes up with another neat idea for parallel processing that kills Arm or someone comes up with a revolutionary patent on wireless communication that will eventuall kill Qualcom ;-)...Kris

goafrit
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Re: Intel for IoT. Oh Really?
goafrit   4/4/2014 5:38:41 PM
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>> Otherwise you could say the only valid business model is drilling a few holes in the ground and polluting the earth.

Thanks - that is the summary. I am open to that Wilco because the last I checked, it is 100% legal and even the government gives them subsidies to make that "pollution" process very profitably to the investors.

goafrit
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Re: Intel for IoT. Oh Really?
goafrit   4/4/2014 5:36:55 PM
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>> I disagree...ARM cores proliferate exponentially...once they dominate they can just increase licensing costs at will

Great point for those that will wait until then. But you never have to wait because no one owns this tech world. I am hoping they jack that $25B valuation to match Qualcomm's $132B. Waiting?? Good luck

goafrit
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Re: Intel for IoT. Oh Really?
goafrit   4/4/2014 5:32:26 PM
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>>  Intel got rid of AMD as a competitor via illegal anti-competitive business practices for which they got fined multiple billions.

They call it the cost of doing business. Until SEC and U.S. law close companies and force them into bankruptcies, that will never change. Catch me, I pay fine. Out of every $10B, I pay fine of $10M, that is good I will say.

goafrit
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Re: Intel for IoT. Oh Really?
goafrit   4/4/2014 5:30:23 PM
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>> Can you explain what exactly could ARM learn from Intel, apart from how to make uncompetitive mobile SoCs and huge losses?

How to make money for investors. Get that $25B valuation to north of $100B. Who cares about the technology, what matters is the money!

Wilco1
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Re: Intel for IoT. Oh Really?
Wilco1   4/4/2014 7:34:10 AM
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If you think QC mostly uses IP from ARM then think again. QC is doing well precisely because they have very good IP themselves. They design their own CPUs which are competitive with ARM's, they have a good GPU design, and they are the number one in modems.

It seems you're just looking at numbers without understanding anything of the underlying business. That's fine if you use it for investing based on numbers, but don't use those numbers as proof as to which business is better. Higher numbers don't automatically mean better in business. Otherwise you could say the only valid business model is drilling a few holes in the ground and polluting the earth.

Wilco1
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Re: Intel for IoT. Oh Really?
Wilco1   4/4/2014 7:23:34 AM
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Can you explain what exactly could ARM learn from Intel, apart from how to make uncompetitive mobile SoCs and huge losses?

I'm sure you already know Intel only makes money from having their own chip manufacturing plants and selling their x86 chips at hugely inflated prices (some at $7000) due to practically being a monopoly. Intel got rid of AMD as a competitor via illegal anti-competitive business practices for which they got fined multiple billions.

ARM simply uses a different business model - and it is working well for them.

krisi
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Re: Intel for IoT. Oh Really?
krisi   4/2/2014 7:53:20 PM
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I disagree...ARM cores proliferate exponentially...once they dominate they can just increase licensing costs at will

goafrit
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Re: Will Intel like thin profit margin?
goafrit   4/2/2014 7:42:53 PM
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>> A week ago I saw an IoT chip offering at 70 cents.

That is actually good price. There are chips that cost 5 cent and in the commoditized consumer market, if you get anything more than 50 cent, the stars are aligning. Unless you are supplying to Apple that wants more tighter specs that others, most OEMs will take it

goafrit
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Re: Intel for IoT. Oh Really?
goafrit   4/2/2014 7:41:00 PM
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>>Most people would agree ARM has one of the best business models of the industry. 

Check their market value. It looks great but I think they could be doing better. Qualcomm has $185B for ARM's $24B despite the former depending and using most of the IPs from the latter.

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