Breaking News
Comments
Newest First | Oldest First | Threaded View
<<   <   Page 2 / 2
HardwIntr
User Rank
Freelancer
Re: How can it be that dead?
HardwIntr   3/31/2014 4:57:33 AM
NO RATINGS
I'm no expert, but if i do (22/14)**2  it makes 246% meaning you can pack 2,5x more transistors on the same 300mm wafer; so even with a 20% higher cost per transistor, there's still a very respectable margin ?

resistion
User Rank
CEO
Re: How can it be that dead?
resistion   3/31/2014 3:52:02 AM
NO RATINGS
There is too much association with lithography, and that is definitely hitting the wall abruptly, as now even EUV would require (at least) double patterning. Moore's law in the product functionality sense could go on, enabled by other technologies. But we need to free ourselves of the yoke of scaling silicon.

Or_Bach
User Rank
Rookie
Re: How can it be that dead?
Or_Bach   3/31/2014 2:57:01 AM
NO RATINGS
Hi

28nm is the last node of Moore's Law. I wrote a full length blog why it is so base on the avaiable open information - <http://www.eetimes.com/author.asp?section_id=36&doc_id=1321536&>

As to the question why people are still going for 20nm and 14nm I don't have a good answer. Some justify it for the lower power and higher speed that those noodes provide. Moore's Law is stricly about lower cost and that stop at 28nm.

AZskibum
User Rank
CEO
Re: How can it be that dead?
AZskibum   3/30/2014 1:55:57 PM
NO RATINGS
Survey bias can occur even with sophisticated responders. I would like to hear the arguments from those who think Moore's Law is already dead at 28 nm. If there were no economic advantage to going smaller than 28 nm, then why did anyone bother to do it and to make those huge investments?

Susan Rambo
User Rank
Blogger
How can it be that dead?
Susan Rambo   3/30/2014 1:23:39 PM
NO RATINGS
I wonder why so many people think Moore's Law is dead now. Is it because it's the first box on the list?

Phononscattering
User Rank
Rookie
What defines Moore's Law?
Phononscattering   3/28/2014 1:27:12 PM
NO RATINGS
- The last node with classical (dennard) scaling was 130 nm. Beyond that it was required to change the device.

- The last node where the price per transistor was reduced by scaling apparently is 28 nm.

What exactly makes moores law? It's definitely possible to go beyond 28 nm. On the other hand it is certainly also possible to introduce cost reduced variants of the 28 nm node to drive the economical side further.

 

 

<<   <   Page 2 / 2


Flash Poll
EE Life
Frankenstein's Fix, Teardowns, Sideshows, Design Contests, Reader Content & More
Max Maxfield

Fist Bumps & the Zombie Apocalypse
Max Maxfield
23 comments
Are you concerned about the possibility of a Zombie Apocalypse or do you scoff at the thought of such an eventuality? If the latter, would you be surprised to hear that the US military has ...

Rishabh N. Mahajani, High School Senior and Future Engineer

Future Engineers: Don’t 'Trip Up' on Your College Road Trip
Rishabh N. Mahajani, High School Senior and Future Engineer
8 comments
A future engineer shares his impressions of a recent tour of top schools and offers advice on making the most of the time-honored tradition of the college road trip.

Larry Desjardin

Engineers Should Study Finance: 5 Reasons Why
Larry Desjardin
41 comments
I'm a big proponent of engineers learning financial basics. Why? Because engineers are making decisions all the time, in multiple ways. Having a good financial understanding guides these ...

Karen Field

July Cartoon Caption Contest: Let's Talk Some Trash
Karen Field
151 comments
Steve Jobs allegedly got his start by dumpster diving with the Computer Club at Homestead High in the early 1970s.

Top Comments of the Week
Like Us on Facebook
EE Times on Twitter
EE Times Twitter Feed

Datasheets.com Parts Search

185 million searchable parts
(please enter a part number or hit search to begin)