Design Con 2015
Breaking News
Comments
Newest First | Oldest First | Threaded View
<<   <   Page 2 / 2
HardwIntr
User Rank
Freelancer
Re: How can it be that dead?
HardwIntr   3/31/2014 4:57:33 AM
NO RATINGS
I'm no expert, but if i do (22/14)**2  it makes 246% meaning you can pack 2,5x more transistors on the same 300mm wafer; so even with a 20% higher cost per transistor, there's still a very respectable margin ?

resistion
User Rank
CEO
Re: How can it be that dead?
resistion   3/31/2014 3:52:02 AM
NO RATINGS
There is too much association with lithography, and that is definitely hitting the wall abruptly, as now even EUV would require (at least) double patterning. Moore's law in the product functionality sense could go on, enabled by other technologies. But we need to free ourselves of the yoke of scaling silicon.

Or_Bach
User Rank
Rookie
Re: How can it be that dead?
Or_Bach   3/31/2014 2:57:01 AM
NO RATINGS
Hi

28nm is the last node of Moore's Law. I wrote a full length blog why it is so base on the avaiable open information - <http://www.eetimes.com/author.asp?section_id=36&doc_id=1321536&>

As to the question why people are still going for 20nm and 14nm I don't have a good answer. Some justify it for the lower power and higher speed that those noodes provide. Moore's Law is stricly about lower cost and that stop at 28nm.

AZskibum
User Rank
CEO
Re: How can it be that dead?
AZskibum   3/30/2014 1:55:57 PM
NO RATINGS
Survey bias can occur even with sophisticated responders. I would like to hear the arguments from those who think Moore's Law is already dead at 28 nm. If there were no economic advantage to going smaller than 28 nm, then why did anyone bother to do it and to make those huge investments?

Susan Rambo
User Rank
Blogger
How can it be that dead?
Susan Rambo   3/30/2014 1:23:39 PM
NO RATINGS
I wonder why so many people think Moore's Law is dead now. Is it because it's the first box on the list?

Phononscattering
User Rank
Manager
What defines Moore's Law?
Phononscattering   3/28/2014 1:27:12 PM
NO RATINGS
- The last node with classical (dennard) scaling was 130 nm. Beyond that it was required to change the device.

- The last node where the price per transistor was reduced by scaling apparently is 28 nm.

What exactly makes moores law? It's definitely possible to go beyond 28 nm. On the other hand it is certainly also possible to introduce cost reduced variants of the 28 nm node to drive the economical side further.

 

 

<<   <   Page 2 / 2


Flash Poll
Top Comments of the Week
Like Us on Facebook
EE Times on Twitter
EE Times Twitter Feed

Datasheets.com Parts Search

185 million searchable parts
(please enter a part number or hit search to begin)
EE Life
Frankenstein's Fix, Teardowns, Sideshows, Design Contests, Reader Content & More
Max Maxfield

Book Review: Deadly Odds by Allen Wyler
Max Maxfield
11 comments
Generally speaking, when it comes to settling down with a good book, I tend to gravitate towards science fiction and science fantasy. Having said this, I do spend a lot of time reading ...

Martin Rowe

No 2014 Punkin Chunkin, What Will You Do?
Martin Rowe
1 Comment
American Thanksgiving is next week, and while some people watch (American) football all day, the real competition on TV has become Punkin Chunkin. But there will be no Punkin Chunkin on TV ...

Rich Quinnell

Making the Grade in Industrial Design
Rich Quinnell
14 comments
As every developer knows, there are the paper specifications for a product design, and then there are the real requirements. The paper specs are dry, bland, and rigidly numeric, making ...

Martin Rowe

Book Review: Controlling Radiated Emissions by Design
Martin Rowe
1 Comment
Controlling Radiated Emissions by Design, Third Edition, by Michel Mardiguian. Contributions by Donald L. Sweeney and Roger Swanberg. List price: $89.99 (e-book), $119 (hardcover).