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Bert22306
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CEO
I remain skeptical
Bert22306   3/28/2014 6:02:39 PM
NO RATINGS
The study seemed to invent some bogus hiring scheme, where applicants are made to add numbers, or other such foolishness. That's not how hiring works in the real world. Why not instead go to hiring managers, ask to see their list of applicants, and see what made them decide one way or another?

Set up some bogus test method, and you'll get the results you were after. Every time.

In my experience, female candidates, if anything, are given priority. It's just that there aren't many of them. But HR departments love to brag about "diversity," so what tends to happen is that any woman applicant who is at all qualified does get hired.

It's strange that it's taking so long to get beyond the 1973-era ERA rhetoric. Why not write a piece that explains why veterinary schools are now favoring female students 8 times out of 10, for example. Even medical schools are predominantly women these days. Why aren't the male applicants being accepted? Gender bias? I doubt it.

By the way, type "gender bias in stem hiring" in your search engine, and the press seems all atwitter about this new "proof." Really, they should go to universities and ask why more women than men are being accepted these days, and gauge the responses.

elctrnx_lyf
User Rank
Manager
Re: No wonder
elctrnx_lyf   3/28/2014 5:16:40 PM
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I will be surprised if gender parity exists in stem jobs.

betajet
User Rank
CEO
Re: No wonder
betajet   3/28/2014 3:04:11 PM
NO RATINGS
I just read an interesting article in the New York Times Magazine (16 March 2014) called "A Tale of Two Valleys", by CS grad student Yiren Lu.  Here's a link to the on-line version, called Silicon Valley's Youth Problem.  The author mentions lots of start-ups in Silicon Valley and San Francisco (which seems to have replaced Silicon Valley as the "cool" place to work), and there seem to be lots of female engineers and programmers working alongside the males.  Maybe this is just my impression of the (female) author's impression rather than a formal study, but I found this interesting.

The article is primarily about how young people are drawn to exciting new start-ups, while older engineers find that those "exciting new start-ups" are doing rather meaningless things.  So you have many old companies that cannot attract new talent because their products seem boring to young people, and start-ups that can't attract "grown-ups" who can make products work robustly.  The article also mentions that in many of these new start-ups, a lot of people know each other from the elite schools they got their degrees from, so there appears to be a certain amount of hiring people you already know rather than finding people who actually meet the company's needs.

Susan Rambo
User Rank
Blogger
No wonder
Susan Rambo   3/28/2014 2:35:01 PM
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I'm afraid to read this story. Seems like a vicious circle. Will it eventually work itself out?

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