Design Con 2015
Breaking News
Comments
Oldest First | Newest First | Threaded View
rick merritt
User Rank
Author
Pick your horse
rick merritt   4/1/2014 9:27:31 AM
NO RATINGS
Arista, HP, Dell and Brocade joined the CLR4 group.

If you are a server or switch engineer, I'd love to hear what horse you are backing in this race and why.

krisi
User Rank
CEO
Re: Pick your horse
krisi   4/1/2014 7:02:39 PM
NO RATINGS
I am not either Rick but "at least six different form factors in the market shipping not even 10,000 units per quarter" sounds a bit crazy for me...hopefully this shakes down to 2-3 shortly

TrishRobina
User Rank
Rookie
The sign
TrishRobina   4/2/2014 12:38:39 PM
NO RATINGS
As we encounter things like this we should be able to prepare ourselves when it comes to such things. - Feed the Children Reviews

Chris Cole
User Rank
Rookie
form factor count check
Chris Cole   4/2/2014 5:08:46 PM
NO RATINGS
The general purpose (i.e. used for a variety of MMF and SMF optics) 10G form factors in chronological and density order are:

   300-pin MSA, XENPAK, X2, XPAK, XFP, SFP+, QSFP+ (quad channel 10G).

So that's a total of 7 general purpose 10G form factors, counting the similar X2 and XPAK separately.

There was also a high density SFF-8470  InfiniBand form factor which supported 2.5G lanes, which could have been used for XAUI 10G interfaces but was not.

The general purpose 100G form factors in chronological and density order are:

   CFP, CFP2, CPAK, CFP4, QSFP28

That's a total of 5 general purpose 100G form factors, counting the similar CFP2 and CPAK separately.

There is also a high density CXP InfiniBand form factor, which is restricted to DAC and MMF interfaces, for both multi-channel 10G and single-channel 100G. If CXP is included in the general purpose form factor counts, the totals are 8 for 10G and 6 for 100G. So today there are more 10G form factors than 100G form factors.

Because SFP+ is so dominant, we tend to forget that it is not the first 10G form factor. The first 10G module (300-pin MSA) was introduced in the late 90s. By today's standards, it is incredibly clunky because it's ~20x the size of the SFP+. However, when introduced it was a breakthrough product because it replaced full size cards.

100G skipped 300-pin MSA as first form factor. We should also not expect QSFP28 to be the end of the road for 100G. A possible next form factor is SFP100, utlizing future 50G or 100G per lane technoogy. This is normal evolution. As optics and IC integration improves, the size shrinks and density increases.

krisi
User Rank
CEO
Re: form factor count check
krisi   4/2/2014 7:51:09 PM
NO RATINGS
100G per lane? do you think this is possible?

Chris Cole
User Rank
Rookie
100G per lane
Chris Cole   4/3/2014 5:22:58 PM
NO RATINGS
The industry is now developing 100G per lane wavelength optics. For a good update consider the all day Ethernet Alliance and OIDA Workshop on this topic in June. The industry is also defining 50G per lane electrical technology in the OIF. 100G per electrical lane is some years off, but expect people to start looking at it in 3 to 5 years.



Flash Poll
Top Comments of the Week
Like Us on Facebook
EE Times on Twitter
EE Times Twitter Feed

Datasheets.com Parts Search

185 million searchable parts
(please enter a part number or hit search to begin)
EE Life
Frankenstein's Fix, Teardowns, Sideshows, Design Contests, Reader Content & More
Max Maxfield

Curiosity Killed the Cat (Just Call Me Mr. Curiosity)
Max Maxfield
23 comments
My wife, Gina The Gorgeous, loves animals. She has two stupid dogs and two stupid cats. How stupid are they? Well, allow me to show you this video of the dogs that I made a couple of years ...

Martin Rowe

No 2014 Punkin Chunkin, What Will You Do?
Martin Rowe
Post a comment
American Thanksgiving is next week, and while some people watch (American) football all day, the real competition on TV has become Punkin Chunkin. But there will be no Punkin Chunkin on TV ...

Rich Quinnell

Making the Grade in Industrial Design
Rich Quinnell
13 comments
As every developer knows, there are the paper specifications for a product design, and then there are the real requirements. The paper specs are dry, bland, and rigidly numeric, making ...

Martin Rowe

Book Review: Controlling Radiated Emissions by Design
Martin Rowe
1 Comment
Controlling Radiated Emissions by Design, Third Edition, by Michel Mardiguian. Contributions by Donald L. Sweeney and Roger Swanberg. List price: $89.99 (e-book), $119 (hardcover).