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ScRamjet
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IQ Limiting
ScRamjet   3/30/2015 9:40:14 AM
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I have always said the IQ of a group is the lowest IQ in the group divided by the number of people in the group. Thus our Government and it's odd decisions.

Duane Benson
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Re: Another example
Duane Benson   4/18/2014 12:19:24 PM
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"specified that voltage to be V volts and a current to be I amps and a power output of P watts. And P bore no resemblance to V*I"

No that is incredibly funny (for those of us not on the receiving end)

Max The Magnificent
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Re: Another example
Max The Magnificent   4/18/2014 11:20:56 AM
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@Antedeluvian: Yesterday I got asked by a customer if a fuse was rated at 240V, 2A, would it change the ratings to 4A at 120V.

I had a sort of related "brain fart" the other day when I was calculating the power for a bunch of LEDs for a display -- when I added in the other stuff it all came to about 20A and I had a moment of panic thinking: "But my household sockets are only rated for 15A"

Then I came to my senses and realized that that's 15A at 120V -- while I needed 20A at 5V -- maybe I'm getting old (although I prefer to think of it as "maturing like a fine cheese" :-)

antedeluvian
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Re: Another example
antedeluvian   4/18/2014 10:17:47 AM
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Also reminds me of a specification for a power supply that I was reviewing for the aeros[pace industry. It specified that voltage to be V volts and a current to be I amps and a power output of P watts. And P bore no resemblance to V*I

antedeluvian
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Another example
antedeluvian   4/18/2014 9:49:43 AM
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Yesterday I got asked by a customer if a fuse was rated at 240V, 2A, would it change the ratings to 4A at 120V.

tom-ii
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Re: Related Insights I've learned
tom-ii   4/14/2014 8:01:09 PM
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I prefer double-entende'd reviews:

 

He's out standing in his field!

You wouldn't believe the work he did!

 

etc...

betajet
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Re: Related Insights I've learned
betajet   4/14/2014 7:42:08 PM
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Tom wrote: Well, first of all, there's no such thing as a negative IQ (by definition)...

Two things spring to mind related to this.  I don't have the source for either one:

1.  It's hard to make things idiot-proof, because idiots are so inventive.

2.  From a poor evaluation: "He has reached rock bottom and is showing signs of starting to dig."

tom-ii
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Related Insights I've learned
tom-ii   4/14/2014 4:44:49 PM
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Well, 1st of all, there's no such thing as a negative IQ (by definition)...

 

HOWEVER - there can be a negative slope to IQ - especially in a group dynamic.

 

Alcohol is a multiplier to this negative slope - that is, it makes it steeper.

 

Keeping to work situations (sort of), though, I have found these two relationships to hold (relatively) true:

 

1) None of us is a dumb as all of us.

 

2) The IQ of a meeting is the highest IQ in the room, divided by the number of people in the room.

 

3) Unless it's the marketing department, in which case it may be the Fibinacci number of the people in the room...

MeasurementBlues
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Gradin's law appied outside engineering
MeasurementBlues   4/7/2014 12:26:30 PM
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I would argue that Gradin's law is even more applicable to groups of people who are not engineers. that 's the "touchy-feely" kind of people who actually take people's reactions into account. When that happens, nothing gets done. The total IQ is exponentially more negative than with engineers. Why? Because with engineers, there is atleast some logic involved.

josyb
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Re: DMV
josyb   4/3/2014 2:58:32 AM
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@jimfordbroadcom:

DMV: the person at the other side may have been just intelligent enough to 'kid' you :) And he knew the USPS would be smart enough to decode the street name :)

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As data rates begin to move beyond 25 Gbps channels, new problems arise. Getting to 50 Gbps channels might not be possible with the traditional NRZ (2-level) signaling. PAM4 lets data rates double with only a small increase in channel bandwidth by sending two bits per symbol. But, it brings new measurement and analysis problems. Signal integrity sage Ransom Stephens will explain how PAM4 differs from NRZ and what to expect in design, measurement, and signal analysis.

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