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DrQuine
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CEO
Updating the Internet of Things
DrQuine   4/2/2014 5:44:47 PM
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Having a computer that receives security updates is bad enough. When every device in the house is getting updated (many of which we may not even be aware of), we may find ourselves in gridlock. Already a quick attempt to check something on the Internet is frequently blocked by a mandatory automated browser reboot and software installation at the worst possible time. Turning off the updates is even worse; many website then refuse admission because I'm running obsolete browser software. I also find that automatic sensors (like the oil level in my home heating tank) seem to do their daily transmission a minute after the vendor does their daily system update so the information is always running a day behind (and worse on weekends). The basic process flows and dependencies need to be worked out and hardened before we find ourselves in the hell of electronic device gridlock.

DrFPGA
User Rank
Blogger
Yep, Bots by the Billions upon Billions
DrFPGA   4/2/2014 8:21:32 PM
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The IoT will be spamming everyone and everything. There will be security flaws (is code ever bug free- NO!) so hackers will probably be able to turn every kitchen appliance into a malware bot. Just great...

jnissen
User Rank
Manager
Re: Yep, Bots by the Billions upon Billions
jnissen   4/3/2014 12:26:06 AM
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Exactly what we don't need. Hopefully this fad will pass soon enough. Do we really need to know that the fridge was opened 10 times in the last 24 hours?

Stephen.Sywak
User Rank
Freelancer
Re: Updating the Internet of Things
Stephen.Sywak   4/4/2014 2:16:29 PM
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Anybody other than me look at those shiny stainless steel refrigerators and hear the "Terminators" theme music in their head?

And, in Ah-nold's voice, "Your milk is bad.  A$$hole."

W1PK
User Rank
Rookie
Re: Yep, Bots by the Billions upon Billions
W1PK   4/4/2014 3:02:57 PM
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Yes, code is sometimes bug-free, and for certain safety-critical applications absolute proof of correctness is mandated by law.  But it takes unwavering design discipline, which is expensive and slow, and the functionality has to be kept simple enough so that it can be completely understood down to the bits-and-bytes level.  And when it's proven correct, it needs to be burned into ROM so that it can never be changed.  In addition, the hardware it executes on has to be proven formally correct.  Can't do it with mayfly parts.

krisi
User Rank
CEO
Re: Yep, Bots by the Billions upon Billions
krisi   4/4/2014 4:48:15 PM
NO RATINGS
Agree...this is exactly where we are going with this home automation non-sense

SandorD
User Rank
Rookie
Re: Yep, Bots by the Billions upon Billions
SandorD   4/6/2014 8:54:44 PM
NO RATINGS
Just imagine being DDOS-ed by a bunch of home appliances!



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