Breaking News
Comments
Oldest First | Newest First | Threaded View
Page 1 / 3   >   >>
MeasurementBlues
User Rank
Author
Audible continuity checkers
MeasurementBlues   4/7/2014 12:14:53 PM
NO RATINGS
Those DMMs with audible continuity testers will sound when the resistance measured is below some threshhold, but not always that close to zero ohms. In same cases, you get the beep but the resistance is still too high for things to work.

Bill_Jaffa
User Rank
Author
Re: Audible continuity checkers
Bill_Jaffa   4/7/2014 12:26:34 PM
NO RATINGS
Good point--as usual, it's a good idea to stop and think first, decide if you need a basic short vs open test, or something a little more sophisticated.

MeasurementBlues
User Rank
Author
Stories versus wires
MeasurementBlues   4/7/2014 12:45:02 PM
NO RATINGS
"The one-wire continuity problem was one I had faced in the past, when I was helping a friend fixing up a very old two-story house."

Two story, one wire, but I ahve three stories. Does that mean I have two wires? Actually, I have 12 Ethernet lines with eight wires each. To locate and document the connections, I used a DMM after making a test cable that shorted the two middle wires together. Then I just had to run around with the sorting cable to each Ethernet jack and listen for hte beep in the wiring closer where all Ehternet lines come out of the wall.

Bill_Jaffa
User Rank
Author
Re: Stories versus wires
Bill_Jaffa   4/7/2014 12:50:08 PM
NO RATINGS
Sounds like you should go Kickstarter and get some up-front funding to make it into a small prject, then get some distributor of building-wiring products to carry it!

MeasurementBlues
User Rank
Author
Re: Stories versus wires
MeasurementBlues   4/7/2014 1:10:02 PM
NO RATINGS
I wrote about the whole thing in some deatil a while ago.

See Multimeter traces home wiring.

Using a multimeter is so uncool. Today, You've need to do the same thing using a phone app as a TDR.

Bill_Jaffa
User Rank
Author
Re: Stories versus wires
Bill_Jaffa   4/7/2014 1:19:21 PM
NO RATINGS
Sometimes it is both more than OK  and actually a smart thing to use an "uncool" technique; otherwise, you risk the solution being more complicated than the problem!

stevehgl
User Rank
Author
single-ended testing
stevehgl   4/7/2014 1:59:50 PM
NO RATINGS
We have a network cable tester which (correctly) reports the length of an unterminated cable... slightly different, but hey...

Sheepdoll
User Rank
Author
One wire try a thousand
Sheepdoll   4/7/2014 2:56:33 PM
NO RATINGS
I work on pipe organs.

It is not uncommon for someone to take an axe to the main cable.  These are the same as a telephone switch trunk, about 2 inches or 5cm in diameter.  Most modern installations use telephone 50 pair wire code.  The old stuff is cotton covered. 

With over 1000 wires in the bundle, it is usually easier to replace with the color coded stuff.  Otherwise it is toneing the lines out against a common.

I keep thinking there should be some sort of device which puts a different frequency on each line, then tells what connects to what.

tb100
User Rank
Author
Re: One wire try a thousand
tb100   4/7/2014 3:21:49 PM
NO RATINGS
Well, you can test 8 cables at a time with a 'cable toner', such as ones made by Aska or Fluke. They are meant for coax, but I don't see why you couldn't use them on other cables, as long as you have a common ground.

zeeglen
User Rank
Author
Re: One wire try a thousand
zeeglen   4/8/2014 10:44:20 AM
NO RATINGS
It is not uncommon for someone to take an axe to the main cable.

@Sheepdoll - just curious, why does a pipe organ have such a cable?  Is it used to activate air valves remotely from a keyboard?  And why would anyone want to take an axe to such a cable?


Page 1 / 3   >   >>


Datasheets.com Parts Search

185 million searchable parts
(please enter a part number or hit search to begin)
Radio
NEXT UPCOMING BROADCAST

What are the engineering and design challenges in creating successful IoT devices? These devices are usually small, resource-constrained electronics designed to sense, collect, send, and/or interpret data. Some of the devices need to be smart enough to act upon data in real time, 24/7. Are the design challenges the same as with embedded systems, but with a little developer- and IT-skills added in? What do engineers need to know? Rick Merritt talks with two experts about the tools and best options for designing IoT devices in 2016. Specifically the guests will discuss sensors, security, and lessons from IoT deployments.
Like Us on Facebook
Special Video Section
LED lighting is an important feature in today’s and future ...
05:27
The LT8602 has two high voltage buck regulators with an ...
05:18
The quality and reliability of Mill-Max's two-piece ...
01:34
Why the multicopter? It has every thing in it. 58 of ...
Security is important in all parts of the IoT chain, ...
Infineon explains their philosophy and why the multicopter ...
The LTC4282 Hot SwapTM controller allows a board to be ...
This video highlights the Zynq® UltraScale+™ MPSoC, and sho...
Homeowners may soon be able to store the energy generated ...
The LTC®6363 is a low power, low noise, fully differential ...
See the Virtex® UltraScale+™ FPGA with 32.75G backplane ...
Vincent Ching, applications engineer at Avago Technologies, ...
The LT®6375 is a unity-gain difference amplifier which ...
The LTC®4015 is a complete synchronous buck controller/ ...
10:35
The LTC®2983 measures a wide variety of temperature sensors ...
The LTC®3886 is a dual PolyPhase DC/DC synchronous ...
The LTC®2348-18 is an 18-bit, low noise 8-channel ...
The LT®3042 is a high performance low dropout linear ...