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antedeluvian
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bottles
antedeluvian   4/25/2014 6:45:54 PM
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David

I am bemused by your plug for the OK. It had some very hard times and only now seems to be making a bit of a comeback. Haven't been inside lately though.

 

At work we have carousels made up of many component trays similar to the last picture in you blog, but they are way outsiode the budget of any home lab. In addition to some of the techniques you use I also use bottles. I bought small plastic bottles  (at the South African store Pick 'n Pay Hypermarket), but baby food used to come in similar containers (maybe still does) and I used them as well. One thing you can do with this approach is to screw the lid on the underside of a shelf giving you much more storage space.

 



David Ashton
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Re: bottles
David Ashton   4/25/2014 7:42:20 PM
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@Antedeluvian... I bought my boxes at the OK probably 25 years ago and they were going strong then.  The boxes have lasted well.

I have also used old marmalade and pickle jars as you describe....but not for electronics stuff.  I have about 8 of them under a shelf for garden hose fittings etc.  Screwing the lid to the shelf makes them very handy.

The component drawers in the last pic I got for $ 9.99 each at Dick Smith, an electronics retailer in Australia who alas no longer stocks them,  I have 6 of them.  The larger professional ones are expensive but these ones are not bad.

I visisted the Pick n Pay Hypermarket a couple of years ago while in Johannesburg.   It's still impressive.  When I used to live in Rhodesia / Zimbabwe in the hard times I used to find it truly awesome...

TonyTib
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I like clear
TonyTib   4/25/2014 7:57:35 PM
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I prefer clear plastic boxes so I can see what's inside - and I don't like the traditional bin organizers because it's too easy for all the drawers to spill out.


I've found some of the dollar store stuff to be too cheap (plastic is wimpy), although now I want to find a pill organizer like you have.

My favorite is the Plano 5750 tackle box; I got lucky a few years ago and picked up a bunch when Lowe's was blowing them out at $2/each.  Mine are full of goodies like connectors and terminal blocks.

For larger items, I like the stacking Sterilie 1723 box (~1/ea; great for DMMs, CAN adapters, and such) and plastic shoe boxes (e.g. Sterilite, for about $1/each - great for AC servo motors, stepper motors, and more).

antedeluvian
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Rolykit
antedeluvian   4/25/2014 8:12:51 PM
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david

Although more of a toolbox, I have had two Rolykits for many years. They accompany me whenever I need to go into the field for electronics installation or maintenance. The phot shows one rolled out and the other rolled up into a portable package.

They appear to be available in the US and I recently bought a look-alike for my son, but I don't recall the name.



David Ashton
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Re: Rolykit
David Ashton   4/26/2014 3:44:48 AM
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@antedeluvian - I have seen those Rolykits before, they are certainly pretty neat.  You could take a lot of stuff with you with one of those.  But their website does not do them many favours - no prices or ordering, no list of distributors....

David Ashton
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Re: I like clear
David Ashton   4/26/2014 3:55:03 AM
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@TonyTib - I always felt kind of silly putting a big label over the top of my plastic boxes (photo 2 on page 2) because as you say the beauty is that you can see what's inside.  So I only do this when  the contents are ICs or something which all look the same - otherwise I use 6mm printed labels which only take a small part of the lid so you can still see inside.

The pill boxes (photo 3 on page 2) are not very high quality and are not clear, so you need to label them as shown.   And you have to stick them together to avoid getting infuriated by rows falling out,  However they do click closed well and are a very compact way to store small components so I tolerate them.  If you really can't find them in the States l could send you a few - all the discount shops seem to have them here.  You could then buy me a beer at EELive 2015 :-)

Your recommended boses look good - like me you seem to go for the postive latches to keep them closed.  $2 is a nice price for a good box.

 

antedeluvian
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Re: Rolykit
antedeluvian   4/26/2014 9:46:00 AM
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David

But their website does not do them many favours - no prices or ordering, no list of distributors....

Maybe you could get the distribution rights for Australasia ;-)

There seem to be plenty on e-bay, although I am not sure if that helps you.

There is at least one other manufacturer although the minimum 1000 piece order may be a bit much. I will try and see if I can find the name of the one I gave to my son. 

 

antedeluvian
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Re: Rolykit
antedeluvian   4/27/2014 11:44:02 AM
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David

But their website does not do them many favours - no prices or ordering, no list of distributors....

Not Rolykit but I found this in your neck of the woods. I hope it is current.

Crusty1
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Re: I like clear
Crusty1   4/27/2014 1:27:59 PM
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Hi David, I love those boxes of theatre sutures but no longer have a source for them.

I love these boxes available from many e-bay seller, so far the best thing I have found to hold SMD parts. There is even a double sided brief case style of these.SMD boxes

 

For standard old time resistors, this storage system has lasted 30 years +

standard lead resistors

 

 

David Ashton
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Re: Rolykit
David Ashton   4/27/2014 5:30:46 PM
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@Antedeluvian....You have been busy...$25...not bad, might order one of those.   Many thanks.

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