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Phillydan
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Altium
Phillydan   5/1/2014 5:59:12 PM
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Nick is no longer with Altium.  The people at Altium's U.S. Location have known about the move for a few weeks now.  Max is right that one of the reasons for the move is to continue developing business in the Defense and Government industry that is a growth sector for Altium, but continuuing to have Corporate Headquarters located in China would be problematic.

Max The Magnificent
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Re: Altium the Confused Company
Max The Magnificent   5/1/2014 10:33:23 AM
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@labnet: Good on Nick for taking a tiny Tasmanian company to the global stage, but boy have there been missteps along the way.

I met Nick several years ago at an ESC conference in Silicon Valley -- he's a real nice guy -- we wended up chatting for an hour or so abdout "stuff" -- it turns out we are both around trhe same age, and we both used to watch Dr Who from behind our respective sofa's when we were 6 years old LOL

Max The Magnificent
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Re: Altium the Confused Company
Max The Magnificent   5/1/2014 10:31:15 AM
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@labnet: I have been using Altium/Protel for 26 years (wow that feels scary).

Tell me about it -- I pre-date EDA as we know it (sad face)

Max The Magnificent
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Re: Altium: the ADHD kid of EDA
Max The Magnificent   5/1/2014 10:29:55 AM
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@SandorD: So it had nothing to do with the cost of a programmer in Sydney compared to Shanghai, right? ;-)

If it had just been that, they could have moved only the R&D team or set up a sub-team -- the fact that they moved the entire executive team tells me they had something else in mind.

 

Max The Magnificent
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Re: Altium "returns" to San DIego (sort of)
Max The Magnificent   5/1/2014 10:04:55 AM
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@Robin: ...the 2000 acquisition of San Diego based EDA company Accel...

That's a really good point -- I did wonder whether to mention the various acquisitions (like Altium buying Morfik, which was interesting because the founder of Morfik, now CEO of Altium, was one of the original guys in Protel).

My problem is that I can easily wander off into the weeds, so I tried to restrain myself to the main story.

labnet
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Altium the Confused Company
labnet   4/30/2014 8:23:54 PM
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I have been using Altium/Protel for 26 years (wow that feels scary). Good on Nick for taking a tiny Tasmanian company to the global stage, but boy have there been missteps along the way. The constant non-sensical renaming of the product. The continual crashes which have only really gotten better the last few years. The features that seem to have been created by the marketing department and the folly or FPGA, when they really should have been making bugs go away and core layout routing features better. Still, it is a great product but I glad I donít work for them! Dave has an interesting rant here http://www.eevblog.com/2013/09/27/eevblog-527-altium-entry-level-pcb-tool-rant/

SandorD
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Altium: the ADHD kid of EDA
SandorD   4/30/2014 8:17:18 PM
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"...although Altium had a great team of developers in Sydney, it was finding it difficult to find more programmers who were familiar with electronics design."

So it had nothing to do with the cost of a programmer in Sydney compared to Shanghai, right? ;-)

They may have some very good reasons but as an Altium user, unfortunately all this jumping around does not inspire confidence in the company. On the other hand, I see the last move as positive.

Robin @ N3IX Engineering
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Altium "returns" to San DIego (sort of)
Robin @ N3IX Engineering   4/30/2014 6:17:10 PM
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Also in the history of Protel/Altium was the 2000 acquisition of San Diego based EDA company Accel.  So I guess at least a part of the company is coming home?

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