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MeasurementBlues
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Blogger
I'm not the only one who says GPIB lives
MeasurementBlues   5/13/2014 2:14:19 PM
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"GIPB continues to amaze people with its persistence.  While so much in the tech world is very fast to change to newer cheaper and better technology,  GPIB remains surprisingly entrenched in the test and measurement arena."

See the rest at
http://info.totaltemptech.com/blog/controlling-instruments-with-gpib-rs-232-or-usb.-what-is-next?

TonyTib
User Rank
CEO
Re: USB cables with screws
TonyTib   5/6/2014 1:55:27 PM
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The problem is that the equipment on the other side also needs thumb screws.


I've played a bit with USB high retention force connectors (available for standard size A and size B); they help.  Even better, Ampenol makes a locking type A (PDF!) connector that works with any standard type A USB cable -- but neither type is very common, although I have seem some industrial equipment advertised with the high retention connectors.


For one customer, we had to add a little machined (which means expensive!) bracket next to the connector so they could cable-tie the USB cable to the bracket.

Measurement.Blues
User Rank
CEO
USB cables with screws
Measurement.Blues   5/6/2014 12:46:21 PM
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@Tom,

Because you seem to hate GPIB so much, here's one for using USB. Some of the complaints about USB have to do with the connectors easily pulled out. I just ran across thumbsrew USB cables.



DrQuine
User Rank
CEO
Moving past GPIB
DrQuine   5/3/2014 9:08:02 PM
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Three decades ago, my home and lab computers required a GPIB interface to the external hard drive and certain other peripherals. As noted, the cord was expensive, inflexible, short, and required an expensive interface. The ability to stack and daisy chain the (bulky) connectors was an advantage. I'd say that for a consumer, USB has rendered the GPIB interface obsolete and irrelevant. Computer manufacturers seem to agree (indeed most laptops are thinner than the connector). In a highly technical instrumentation lab where latency rules, I'll concede they may wish to continue connecting their test and measurement devices with GPIB interfaces. 

tom-ii
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Not Die, some better word
tom-ii   5/3/2014 6:16:20 PM
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Perhaps "Pull a Patton?"  (and get run over by a horse cart)

_hm
User Rank
CEO
Not Die, some better word
_hm   5/3/2014 4:13:59 PM
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GPIB served great to Test and Mesaurement communities for over three decades.

Die does not sound proper word for this veteran.

For super hero like GPIB, we should coin better phrase.

Measurement.Blues
User Rank
CEO
Re: GPIB
Measurement.Blues   5/2/2014 3:15:15 PM
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Here's an article I write about how VISA works with GPIB, VXI, PXI, Ethernet, and USB. Same application code, just different hardware bus.

VISA tunnels down to the kernel



Niall Gallagher
User Rank
Rookie
GPIB's Compelling Advantage.
Niall Gallagher   5/2/2014 11:45:04 AM
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While I share much of the sentiment regarding GPIB and its disadvantages, I have to disagree with the conclusion that it is ready to die. 

GPIB's ace is latency.   At around 30 times lower than ethernet and 4 times lower than USB, GPIB still wins when speed is critical and data transfer sizes are low.  This is generally the case in production testing.  While 1000 microseconds of latency does not seem like much, a test sequence for a complex wireless device may have up to 20,000 measurement transfers of a few bytes each.  1000us latency each time adds 20 seconds of dead time to the test sequence, reducing the throughput and increasing test cost by as much as 20%.

National Instruments has a number of papers on this subject on its website:  http://www.ni.com/white-paper/3509/en/#toc2


PXI has the advantage of very low latency and high bandwidth PCI Express, which makes it a great choice for speed critical testing such as production test.  For those using discrete instruments while concerned about test times, GPIB is still the way to go.

Kudos to Hewlett-Packard for developing an interface that has endured for over 40 years.  Calls for its demise are somewhat premature.

rob18767
User Rank
Manager
Re: GPIB cables
rob18767   5/2/2014 9:38:17 AM
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That's the issue. We still sell and use GPIB gear. 

The industries that do use GPIB insist on having GPIB. Therefore we have to provide GPIB or they are no longer our customers.

They have no plans to change in the immediate future. 

It's called 'giving customers what they want' as opposed to 'making engineers lives' easier' 

 

tom-ii
User Rank
Blogger
Re: GPIB has to die, SCPI does not
tom-ii   5/2/2014 7:02:32 AM
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In some cases that's true, in some cases not.  Many vendors (especially NI) have made that set of drivers available on the software side for (relatively) easy porting of legacy software to new equipment.

 

However, there's plenty of devices out there that each require their own custom driver - which is also worrisome in the case of long-term test equipment.  Better for things to have well-defined software interfaces that use industry standard hardware interfaces and protocols.  This way you can upgrade when necessary, even if at an increased cost

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