Breaking News
Comments
Oldest First | Newest First | Threaded View
Page 1 / 2   >   >>
rick merritt
User Rank
Author
25, 40, 50G?
rick merritt   5/1/2014 4:38:50 PM
NO RATINGS
In one of his foils on speeds, Weckel put in 25/40G, hedging because the industry is hedging about the next step, especially for serial Ethernet.

Know something about this? Give me a shot here and at rick.merritt@ubm.com

krisi
User Rank
Author
Re: 25, 40, 50G?
krisi   5/1/2014 7:13:31 PM
NO RATINGS
Smaller (datacenters) decrease...larger increase...China is starting to take the market share...the overall market flat or slighly declining...nothing really new..I think that applies to most technologies today ;-)...Kris

Bert22306
User Rank
Author
Re: 25, 40, 50G?
Bert22306   5/1/2014 9:29:32 PM
NO RATINGS
You kinda stole my words, Kris. Everything seems to be as one would expect. I don't really see who the big Ethernet switch buyers WOULD be, if not data centers, and of course also ISPs and enterprise networks.

If enterpise networks outsource their data center functions, that doesn't sound odd either. Individual households, whenever possible, I'm pretty sure use WiFi rather than cabled Ethernet and switches. So aside from the one modem/router/switch combination box, I would expect any extra standalone Ethernet switches in households would be the exception.

krisi
User Rank
Author
Re: 25, 40, 50G?
krisi   5/2/2014 10:14:30 AM
NO RATINGS
I agree Bert...I have few friends who have Ethernet switches at their house but most, including me, although technically savy don't bother...cable modem and WiFi is sufficient

tpfj
User Rank
Author
Re: 25, 40, 50G?
tpfj   5/2/2014 10:42:26 AM
NO RATINGS
Until you try streaming 4K content over WiFi ...

krisi
User Rank
Author
Re: 25, 40, 50G?
krisi   5/2/2014 10:57:37 AM
NO RATINGS
Sure...but why would I want to do that?

tpfj
User Rank
Author
Re: 25, 40, 50G?
tpfj   5/2/2014 11:00:41 AM
NO RATINGS
Because your next TV or the one after that will be a 4K TV. Can't stand in the way of progress.

TanjB
User Rank
Author
Re: 25, 40, 50G?
TanjB   5/2/2014 11:03:24 AM
NO RATINGS
Rick, the interesting thing is the emergence of true 25Gbps fibers.  10GbE and 40GbE are carried on parallel fibers with usually a 2.5Gbps rate on each fiber.  If you are building a 100,000 machine DC with 10GbE, that is a staggering amount of fiber.

So, when the transceiver story for 25Gbps settles down and they are shipping in volume at reasonable prices, there are some interesting questions.  How many folks would be happy to take the speed boost to 25, use just one fiber, and say they are really happy?  Win-win, what's not to like?  Why make it more complicated by going to 50 (or 40, which would run fiber pairs at 20)?  I suspect a lot of machinery can cruise just fine at 25 and never reach that ceiling.  The supercomputer crowd, of course, will want 100.

The underlying technology is modular (and has been for some time) so we will see all kinds of variety in deployment, and it will not matter much.  Just like 40 GbE and 10 GbE switches today use mostly the same components just configured differently.

The thing to watch is how the new 25Gbps transceivers reach the market, and the impact they are going to have no matter how they are configured.

krisi
User Rank
Author
Re: 25, 40, 50G?
krisi   5/2/2014 11:16:46 AM
NO RATINGS
we are long way from 4K TV...not every technological development is progress...3D TV wasn't

krisi
User Rank
Author
Re: 25, 40, 50G?
krisi   5/2/2014 11:18:17 AM
NO RATINGS
why stop at 25Gb/s? the single fiber strand can take much more, why not 100Gb/s?

Page 1 / 2   >   >>


Datasheets.com Parts Search

185 million searchable parts
(please enter a part number or hit search to begin)
Radio
NEXT UPCOMING BROADCAST

What are the engineering and design challenges in creating successful IoT devices? These devices are usually small, resource-constrained electronics designed to sense, collect, send, and/or interpret data. Some of the devices need to be smart enough to act upon data in real time, 24/7. Are the design challenges the same as with embedded systems, but with a little developer- and IT-skills added in? What do engineers need to know? Rick Merritt talks with two experts about the tools and best options for designing IoT devices in 2016. Specifically the guests will discuss sensors, security, and lessons from IoT deployments.
Most Recent Comments
dnadler017
 
realjjj
 
realjjj
 
jimfordbroadcom
 
jimfordbroadcom
 
resistion
 
jimfordbroadcom
 
jimfordbroadcom
 
realjjj
Like Us on Facebook
Special Video Section
LED lighting is an important feature in today’s and future ...
05:27
The LT8602 has two high voltage buck regulators with an ...
05:18
The quality and reliability of Mill-Max's two-piece ...
01:34
Why the multicopter? It has every thing in it. 58 of ...
Security is important in all parts of the IoT chain, ...
Infineon explains their philosophy and why the multicopter ...
The LTC4282 Hot SwapTM controller allows a board to be ...
This video highlights the Zynq® UltraScale+™ MPSoC, and sho...
Homeowners may soon be able to store the energy generated ...
The LTC®6363 is a low power, low noise, fully differential ...
See the Virtex® UltraScale+™ FPGA with 32.75G backplane ...
Vincent Ching, applications engineer at Avago Technologies, ...
The LT®6375 is a unity-gain difference amplifier which ...
The LTC®4015 is a complete synchronous buck controller/ ...
10:35
The LTC®2983 measures a wide variety of temperature sensors ...
The LTC®3886 is a dual PolyPhase DC/DC synchronous ...
The LTC®2348-18 is an 18-bit, low noise 8-channel ...
The LT®3042 is a high performance low dropout linear ...