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RichQ
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Glasses rule
RichQ   5/14/2014 2:33:12 PM
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I think that something akin to the Google Glass, but without the camera and price tag, would be the way to go. That way you can take it off easily when you don't want the distraction. I think the occulus goggles are too immersive and will be used only in constrained settings and then only when you want the fully immersive virtual reality. For augmented reality, you will want to view the real world somehow.

My thinking is that the glasses superimpose the digital over the real world, and will include a kind of gesture recognition system to allow you to interact with the digital image, such as clicking buttons and such. So now instead of talking to someone unseen, you will be waving your hands at something unseen, making you look no less crazy, though.

The problem I see with embedded systems or even contact lenses is in getting power to the device sufficient to activate all those LEDs.

 

Max The Magnificent
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Re: Glasses rule
Max The Magnificent   5/14/2014 2:50:36 PM
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@Rich: I think the occulus goggles are too immersive and will be used only in constrained settings and then only when you want the fully immersive virtual reality.

In the case of the Oculus Rift-type presentation, you could have camera's on the front presenting you with a photo-realistic copy of the world around you -- and then superimpose the augmented text and graphics and whatnot.

I've not tried one, but I'm guessing that the problem with things like Google Glass is that it occupies only a small portion of your visual area -- and you have to specially look at it to see the info it's presenting.

RichQ
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Re: Glasses rule
RichQ   5/14/2014 2:59:41 PM
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Yes, you could make the goggles add a camera view to the digital info, but that seems like an expensive way to be see things in most circumstances. Although full immersive would be handy in some situations such as you describe, I don't think it will be the default condition.

As to the need to deliberately look to see the digital info I don't see that as a problem. In fact, I think it would be preferable. Otherwise the digital info keeps intruding even if you don't want to look at it.

Max The Magnificent
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Re: Glasses rule
Max The Magnificent   5/14/2014 5:19:50 PM
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@Rich: Otherwise the digital info keeps intruding even if you don't want to look at it.

This will be one of the topics I cover in my follow-up column tomorrow

JanineLove
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Names
JanineLove   5/14/2014 5:17:14 PM
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As someone who is pretty bad at remembering people's names, i would enjoy my glasses being able to tell me (using facial recognition) what someone's name is. As a professor, this was a real challenge. Even more so when you run into the student out of context, like at the deli.

JanineLove
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Re: Names
JanineLove   5/14/2014 5:18:28 PM
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On the other hand, as a former professor, this has me worried:

"I can imagine a time when contact lenses have the capability to project high-resolution textual and graphical imagery directly onto their owners' retinas. At some stage, it wouldn't surprise me if it became possible to have such equipment embedded in the eye itself."

What are the implications here for cheating on exams?


Max The Magnificent
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Re: Names
Max The Magnificent   5/14/2014 5:22:42 PM
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@Janine: What are the implications here for cheating on exams?


Pretty bad, I would say...


JanineLove
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Re: Names
JanineLove   5/14/2014 5:26:25 PM
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Ah, the horror of it Max. Where will people like you and me with such a depth of knowledge get the respect we deserve when everyone can have a running wikipedia in their eyes? ;-)

Max The Magnificent
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Re: Names
Max The Magnificent   5/14/2014 5:36:15 PM
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@Janine: Where will people like you and me with such a depth of knowledge get the respect we deserve...

I don't know about you, but I'll be sitting in the corner of a bar and -- for the price of a beer many beers -- I will regale the gathered throng with tales of daring do BEFORE everyone had augmented reality :-)

betajet
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General Studies
betajet   5/14/2014 6:58:33 PM
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Wikipedia and other Internet resources are great if you know what you're looking for and you know what it's called.  If you don't have enough general esoteric (sometimes a euphemism for "trivial") knowledge, you don't know things even exist and then the Internet is useless.  For example, if you'd never heard of Le Pétomane, you'd probably never think to look him up.

Max The Magnificent
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Re: General Studies
Max The Magnificent   5/15/2014 1:54:58 PM
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@betajet: Wikipedia and other Internet resources are great if you know what you're looking for and you know what it's called.

There's a smartphone app where you can let it listen to a fragment of a tune and it will return all of the details associated with the piece -- without your first knowing what it was called.

I bet in the future uyou cioudl have a voice interface and try to vaguely describe something and for the servers in the cloud to say something like "Ah, you are looking for information on something the ancients used to call a book!"

 

betajet
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Re: General Studies
betajet   5/15/2014 2:33:10 PM
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Max wrote: I bet in the future you could have a voice interface and try to vaguely describe something and for the servers in the cloud...

Sounds like my octagenarian Dad when he asks me to identify a movie with "that actor who... you know... the one who was also in that movie about... " and I answer something like "You mean le jour se lève?" and he says "yes! that one" and I say "oh, you mean Jean Gabin".

Actually, I ran a test today and was suprised to see that Google is finally able to find some items that I had been using as test cases for many years.  I'll need to come up with some even more obscure ones :-)

One of them you'll find most amusing: Bob Rowsem's Epistle to Bonypart, a semi-literate letter of defiance from a British seaman to Napoleon regarding the latter's foolish idea of crossing the Channel to attack Blighty.  An excerpt:
Come, I'll give ye a toaft: Here's hard breezes and foul weather to ye, my boy, in your paffage: Here's May you be fea-fick! we'll foon make ye fick of the fea...


DrFPGA
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Re: General Studies
DrFPGA   5/19/2014 10:46:32 AM
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Perhaps the tests influenced the google search algorithm? A problem with tests of this these types of self organizing systems. Now if we could only find some tests that introduced some self-disorganizing...

betajet
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Re: General Studies
betajet   5/19/2014 2:30:24 PM
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Dr FPGA wrote: Perhaps the tests influenced the google search algorithm?

In the case of Bob Rowsem, I think it's just that it was a long time before the original materials got scanned with OCR so they've only recently become searchable.  Bob Rowsem is printed material from now-obscure publications circa 1800 or copyrighted books about the Era of Napoleon.

antedeluvian
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Re: General Studies
antedeluvian   5/18/2014 7:37:37 PM
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Max

There's a smartphone app where you can let it listen to a fragment of a tune and it will return all of the details associated with the piece -- without your first knowing what it was called.

I have tried Shazam out and it is remarkable. I tried many obscure English folk groups, South African groups and some American stuff and there were only two songs it could not identify.

however it only works on recorded music. It states "singing, humming or llve performances won't be tagged"

Max The Magnificent
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Re: General Studies
Max The Magnificent   5/19/2014 10:20:28 AM
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@antedeluvian: ...there were only two songs it could not identify...

What were they? LOL

Max The Magnificent
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Re: General Studies
Max The Magnificent   5/15/2014 1:57:46 PM
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@betajet: Wikipedia and other Internet resources are great if you know what you're looking for and you know what it's called.

I love those Visual Dictionaries -- they are wonderful for trying to find the name of something like "that bit of wood that stickes up at the front of an old wooden sailing ship"

betajet
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Re: General Studies
betajet   5/15/2014 2:49:52 PM
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Max wrote: I love those Visual Dictionaries -- they are wonderful for trying to find the name of something like "that bit of wood that stickes up at the front of an old wooden sailing ship".

A friend of mine had an uncle in Scotland who owned a hardware store.  His favorite sport was tormenting American tourists by refusing to understand what they wanted unless they used the proper (and sometimes archaic) British terminology.  For example, if someone wanted a screwdriver, he would look perplexed and ask them to explain what a screwdriver is.  Now, when you try to explain what an ordinary object is you feel like an idiot, and he did everything to enhance that feeling.  He would bring over any number of unrelated screws and chisels and everything that could possibly relate to the victim's attempts at explanation.  Finally he'd tire of the game and say: "Ohhhhh... you want a turnscrew!"

Max The Magnificent
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Re: General Studies
Max The Magnificent   5/15/2014 2:54:59 PM
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@betajet: His favorite sport was tormenting American tourists...

That's not a sport -- it's like shooting fish in a barrel LOL

kakesson
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Re: Names
kakesson   5/15/2014 2:03:01 PM
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Always having information available might imply that we have to change the way we do exams. Maybe they would have to look more like open book exam, where the problem is not to remember things, but to quickly figure out what you need and how to apply it to a problem. 

I think there were similar concerns when the calculator showed up, but there are still math exams. In fact, many of these rely on students bringing their calculators.

elizabethsimon
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Re: Names
elizabethsimon   5/15/2014 4:03:27 PM
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During my brief stint as an instructor, I gave open book exams where the students typically had to look up something in a table that was in the book then apply it to the probelm at hand. After the first exam where a number of students had decided that "open book" meant that they didn't have to study, I explicitly pointed out to them before the next exam that "open book" ment that they had to read the book to find out where things were and know what applied to which question. I also pointed out that the exam would have the same type of questions that they had already answered on their homework.

 

Max The Magnificent
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Re: Names
Max The Magnificent   5/14/2014 5:21:28 PM
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@Janine: Even more so when you run into the student out of context, like at the deli.

Or a mime class

Duane Benson
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Too intrusive
Duane Benson   5/15/2014 1:40:53 PM
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I don't want glasses, contact lenses, Google Glass type things, or anything of the sort. I just want wireless into my brain so the information can be directly inserted into my thought process.

Regardless of whether it's visual or not, imagine, if you will, a scenario where security, in that future, is as effective as it is today...

Max The Magnificent
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Re: Too intrusive
Max The Magnificent   5/15/2014 1:58:43 PM
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@Duane: Regardless of whether it's visual or not, imagine, if you will, a scenario where security, in that future, is as effective as it is today...

A scary thought indeed...

Garcia-Lasheras
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Re: Too intrusive
Garcia-Lasheras   5/15/2014 4:58:32 PM
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@Duane: "I just want wireless into my brain so the information can be directly inserted into my thought process."

I totally agree. There are a lot advantages but also inconveniences around this...

One of the positive changes would be the change in education: no more memorizing data that will already be in your brain -- or you'll be able to download just by thinking in it. The main point would be being creative in order to mix and process all the available data.

As a negative one... I can appreciate the shadow of "Big Brother" around -- this would be a candy for the NSA, Google and so on ;-)

Duane Benson
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Re: Too intrusive
Duane Benson   5/15/2014 5:07:40 PM
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Garcia - "As a negative one... I can appreciate the shadow of "Big Brother" around -- this would be a candy for the NSA, Google and so on"

Can you image what it would be like if advertisers managed to get inside such a thing? Scary.

Garcia-Lasheras
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Re: Too intrusive
Garcia-Lasheras   5/15/2014 5:15:38 PM
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@Duane: "Can you image what it would be like if advertisers managed to get inside such a thing? Scary."

Or funny if somebody as Matt Groenning imagine it :)

This is from Futurama, when Fry (after being on hibernation for 1K years) discovers that somehow there were ads being projected into his dreams:

Leela: Didn't you have ads in the 21st century?"

Fry: Well sure, but not in our dreams. Only on TV and radio, and in magazines, and movies, and at ball games... and on buses and milk cartons and t-shirts, and bananas and written on the sky. But not in dreams, no siree.

alex_m1
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Re: Too intrusive
alex_m1   5/16/2014 1:28:14 AM
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@Garcia: The interesting thing is - augmented reality can also be used to remove ads in real life(and hopefully replace them with cats). Which is a feature i believe plenty of us will want.

BUT HOW WILL SOCIETY SURVIVE WITHOUT ADS ?

Max The Magnificent
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Re: Too intrusive
Max The Magnificent   5/19/2014 10:19:21 AM
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@alex_m1: ...and hopefully replace them with cats...

You, Sir, are a monster ... now if you had said "beers"...

alex_m1
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Re: Too intrusive
alex_m1   5/19/2014 10:40:16 AM
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@Max, well, you asked:

http://philly.thedrinknation.com/uploads/images/beercats/beer-cat-1.jpg

Max The Magnificent
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Re: Too intrusive
Max The Magnificent   5/19/2014 11:58:57 AM
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@Alex: well, you asked

Now, that's my sort of cat LOL

http://philly.thedrinknation.com/uploads/images/beercats/beer-cat-1.jpg

 

Max The Magnificent
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Re: Too intrusive
Max The Magnificent   5/19/2014 10:18:02 AM
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@Garcia: As a negative one... I can appreciate the shadow of "Big Brother" around -- this would be a candy for the NSA, Google and so on ;-)

I agree -- imagine getting a virus that allowed companies to keep on hitting you with adverts tha tare projected directly onto your retina (or into your brian) and your not being able to turn them off...

zeeglen
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Re: Too intrusive
zeeglen   5/19/2014 11:48:59 AM
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@ Max projected directly onto your retina (or into your brian) and your not being able to turn them off...

R.A. Heinlein described in a early 60's novel (Podkayne of Mars) very loud annoying holographic commercials forced onto taxi-cab customers.  At least they could bribe the driver into reducing the level.


mhrackin
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Re: Too intrusive
mhrackin   6/2/2014 12:12:45 PM
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And how about the really scary one: HACKERS!



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