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Duane Benson
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Tube radios
Duane Benson   5/23/2014 7:41:24 PM
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I still have two tube radios. I've got a Hallicrafters S-38, 1940's (I think) vintage short wave radio. I haven't turned it on in a few years, but it worked just fine the last time I did.

I've also got a 1929 Atwater Kent TRF (tuned radio frequency) radio. Unfortunately, I don't have the cabinet. Just the radio. I haven't turned it on since about 1984, but it did work then. The sound wasn't so great after my rather lousy job of re-coning the speaker. I'm a little afraid to turn it on now, because of the old capacitors.

perl_geek
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CEO
Anachronism
perl_geek   5/23/2014 7:12:32 PM
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I think you'll find that the radio dates from the mid 1950s, not the early 1940s.

Apart from the aesthetics, the firm's history http://www.grundig.de/en/company/about-grundig/grundig-history/years-1945-1954/ indicates it was strictly a post-war manufacturer.

If you're going to fix it, you might want to RTFM; http://www.grundig.owner-manuals.com/5088-service-manual-GRUNDIG.html  (I assume the site is kosher, but caveat emptor).

Other people have also repaired them, and the comments suggest it's worth doing: http://www.radiomuseum.org/r/grundig_konzertgeraet_5088_1.html 

 

 

 

zeeglen
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Don't Fire it up yet
zeeglen   5/23/2014 5:23:30 PM
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@Max:  You would be wise to replace all the paper and electrolytic capacitors BEFORE applying power.  You don't want to fry a hard-to-obtain vacuum tube.  And there is a lot more that goes wrong with tubes than just their heaters/filaments. 

That Grundig radio probably has a power transformer so the heaters will be in parallel, unlike the series connected heaters in the "All American 5".

There is a Yahoo group called "Fun with tubes" that have a lot of good information on restoring antique radios and designing guitar amplifiers.

When I was a little kid my parents had a Grundig radio that looked very similar.

Colin Walls
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Rookie
what is that?
Colin Walls   5/23/2014 4:50:41 PM
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Hi Max

First off, diagnosing vacuum tube [sorry "valve"!] falures is not too hard. It is the filament that gives out. If it doesn't glow and get hot, it's dead.  Unfortunately, some designed wire all the filaments in series, so, when one dies, they all appear dead. So you ned to pull each  one and check its filament.  A bit like Christmas tree lights ..

Is that an ASR33 Teletype outside your office? If so, why??

 

BR c

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