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Pablo Valerio
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Re:marketing costs
Pablo Valerio   5/26/2014 10:38:50 AM
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"I do not think Apple really spends any money on their marketing"

That is not what I see here in Barcelona where Apple took all the advertising on bus stops and huge billboards. 

In 2013 (according to their 10-K annual report) Apple spent $1.29 billion on marketing and selling expenses, compared to $910 million in 2012.

Surely this include all marketing for the entire company, not only for the iPhone. 

elctrnx_lyf
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Re:marketing costs
elctrnx_lyf   5/26/2014 10:19:13 AM
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I do not think Apple really spends any money on their marketing but samsung might spend huge amounts of money. In any case it is very important for the company to prove the product is going to be reliable and at the same time the service is guranteed.

Pablo Valerio
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Re:marketing costs
Pablo Valerio   5/26/2014 9:15:43 AM
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p.s. though $300 is always better than $600 :)

Agreed. one of the factors that raise the price on expensive brands is the marketing cost.

Google doesn't have to pay retailers nor discount the price of the Nexus line to operators. OnePlus sells only via their website.

Samsung is spending billions marketing their Galaxy smartphones, and Apple does the same. Of course their sales volume is huge, and looks like their marketing works.

William Miller
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Re: Why do one need this much power?
William Miller   5/26/2014 7:02:14 AM
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Fair enough! I don't have a camera on my phone 'cause I simply don't need it. And it cost $30 - simply for calls and text messages. 

p.s. though $300 is always better than $600 :)

Pablo Valerio
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Re: Why do one need this much power?
Pablo Valerio   5/26/2014 6:18:26 AM
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@AZskibum, I worked for 3Dfx when it was the premium graphics card manufacturer, and people paid more money at that time for a high-end graphics controller than tosday for a computer.

As you said there are users that want the maximum performance to play games, high-resolution video, run simulations, etc.

I do not need the power of the latest processor but many apps today require certain features and have minimum hardware requirements, plus access to high-speed networks.

Foe many users a feature phone is enough, but there is a demand in the high-end market, as demostrated by the likes of Apple, HTC, Samsung and Sony.

AZskibum
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Re: Why do one need this much power?
AZskibum   5/25/2014 7:26:32 PM
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I recall some people asking that same question about desktop PCs and laptops at one time -- why do I need a higher performance CPU and more memory if I'm just going to use it for web browsing and checking email? It was and still is a valid question, for PCs as well as for phones. There are lots of different kinds of users -- some are power users that run intensive apps, others not so much. If your phone is "just a phone" to you, then no, you don't need that much power.

 

_hm
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Why do one need this much power?
_hm   5/25/2014 2:57:38 PM
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I have simple Nexus 3, and I use 20% of its power. Why do one need this much power in mobile phone?

Let us talk about creation with what device we have and not just getting ultra powerful device and not knowing what to do next with it.

 



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