Breaking News
Comments
Oldest First | Newest First | Threaded View
Page 1 / 3   >   >>
TarraTarra!
User Rank
Author
ASSP not Server SoC?
TarraTarra!   6/3/2014 11:45:47 AM
NO RATINGS
The interesting thing here is the sheer variety of Thunder options optimized for different workloads. Cavium seems to have pulled this out of their experience with Embedded parts. What I am confused about after reading this is how this will apply to servers.

Datacenter operators buy bulk servers for their fleet. They typically do not know apriori what workloads will run on them. Now they would have to chose the type of server for each workload?? One thing that Intel got right was to simplify the product offerings. Their problem was cost and power.

Cavium seems to be overthinking the problem here? 

servernut
User Rank
Author
48 core power would be very high
servernut   6/3/2014 12:13:36 PM
NO RATINGS
Rick,

Any indication from cavium on what the power of the 48 core device would be? the article mentions the cores as out of order. cavium has so far stayed away with in order simple designs for their cpus.  is that a typo? If the core is out of order, then a 48 core thunder would be over 150W! How will it then compete with intel?

 

 

rick merritt
User Rank
Author
Re: 48 core power would be very high
rick merritt   6/3/2014 12:51:24 PM
NO RATINGS
@Servernut: Going back to my notes I see Cavium left itself some quibble room, saying its core "supports optimized OOO."

Re power, as reported they said the products ranges from 20-95W including the Ethernet ports, so well below Xeon.

rick merritt
User Rank
Author
Re: ASSP not Server SoC?
rick merritt   6/3/2014 12:53:10 PM
NO RATINGS
@Tarra! Tarra!  I may not have been clear about this. There are four families of products under the Thunder brand. One is specifically targeted at servers. Others target storage and security appliances and networking.

rick merritt
User Rank
Author
Reviving hopes for ARM servers
rick merritt   6/3/2014 12:54:22 PM
NO RATINGS
After the implosion of Calxeda and the rumors about Samsung going off an ARM server project, this initiative just got a badly needed shot of espresso.

But like Linley said, I suspect the real market here starts in 2016, about the time B'com rolls out its part.

HankWalker
User Rank
Author
We Need Data
HankWalker   6/3/2014 1:11:57 PM
NO RATINGS
Until we have throughput/$, throughput/W and similar metrics, we cannot make any useful comparison between product offerings. All we have right now is marketing and PowerPoint.

tb100
User Rank
Author
MIPS and Arm
tb100   6/3/2014 2:08:50 PM
NO RATINGS
It may be that MIPS and Arm are geared for different markets, but given that Cavium is making basically the same computer chip with MIPS cores and with Arm cores, it would be interesting to see benchmark results from the two processors.

It would be a real apples-to-apples comparison. Which core is faster?

servernut
User Rank
Author
Re: 48 core power would be very high
servernut   6/3/2014 2:37:58 PM
NO RATINGS
"Re power, as reported they said the products ranges from 20-95W including the Ethernet ports, so well below Xeon."

 


Really?? Xeon E3 power is in the 40W range, E5 is in the 60W range. Even if you factor in the additional components. How is it lower than Xeon?

 

On the OOO, yes that is a very wide quibble room :) Octeon has in-order multi-issue and to go to OOO is not that easy. I would imagine that is a convinent error on their part.

servernut
User Rank
Author
Re: We Need Data
servernut   6/3/2014 2:51:58 PM
NO RATINGS
@Hank, Agree. This is marketing FUD at its best. The silicon is nowhere in sight and will be in production in 2016. It is very easy to make claims with power-point 2 years out.

servernut
User Rank
Author
Re: 48 core power would be very high
servernut   6/3/2014 2:55:17 PM
NO RATINGS
@Servernut: Going back to my notes I see Cavium left itself some quibble room, saying its core "supports optimized OOO."

 


Btw, Rick, what other points in your article are inaccurate "quibbles-room" from Cavium that you are merely repeating? Been reading your articles for sometime and you are usually good about sniffing out marketing FUD.

 

 

Page 1 / 3   >   >>


Datasheets.com Parts Search

185 million searchable parts
(please enter a part number or hit search to begin)
Radio
LATEST ARCHIVED BROADCAST

What are the engineering and design challenges in creating successful IoT devices? These devices are usually small, resource-constrained electronics designed to sense, collect, send, and/or interpret data. Some of the devices need to be smart enough to act upon data in real time, 24/7. Specifically the guests will discuss sensors, security, and lessons from IoT deployments.

Brought to you by:

Like Us on Facebook
Special Video Section
Once the base layer of a design has been taped out, making ...
In this short video we show an LED light demo to ...
The LTC2380-24 is a versatile 24-bit SAR ADC that combines ...
In this short video we show an LED light demo to ...
02:46
Wireless Power enables applications where it is difficult ...
07:41
LEDs are being used in current luxury model automotive ...
With design sizes expected to increase by 5X through 2020, ...
01:48
Linear Technology’s LT8330 and LT8331, two Low Quiescent ...
The quality and reliability of Mill-Max's two-piece ...
LED lighting is an important feature in today’s and future ...
05:27
The LT8602 has two high voltage buck regulators with an ...
05:18
Silego Technology’s highly versatile Mixed-signal GreenPAK ...
The quality and reliability of Mill-Max's two-piece ...
01:34
Why the multicopter? It has every thing in it. 58 of ...
Security is important in all parts of the IoT chain, ...
Infineon explains their philosophy and why the multicopter ...
The LTC4282 Hot SwapTM controller allows a board to be ...
This video highlights the Zynq® UltraScale+™ MPSoC, and sho...
Homeowners may soon be able to store the energy generated ...
The LTC®6363 is a low power, low noise, fully differential ...