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Susan Rambo
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Re: Expectations vs reality
Susan Rambo   6/6/2014 6:09:55 PM
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True. Also, keeping technology a secret, as this story shows, can give you a very brief advantage. Soon enough everyone has the same technology. Perhaps some day, deterrent technology will better than offensive technology, so wars will be unwinnable from the get go. You'd be able to immediately shut down each side's weapons.

Bert22306
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Re: Expectations vs reality
Bert22306   6/6/2014 4:59:48 PM
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I tried to think of an angle to approach it but not until now did I realize: we could have made a list of all the techniques used that made the invasion successful that could not be used today because of technology.

True enough, but this has been going on for a very long time. Warfare techniques change rapidly. One of the oft-cited criticisms of the miltary is that they don't adapt fast enough, but rather continue to be structured "to fight the last war." Unless some sort of cataclysmic event happens, no one would expect to fight a protracted war such as WWII these days. In fact, even during WWII, there was a revolution going on in how sea power and air power would and should be used, which were thoroughly different from what had been the case as recently as 23 years prior!

You have to admit, China's economy has changed a lot in 25 years.

Indeed. But that too can be attributed to the government. One reason for such a huge change was that the Chinese economy had a whole lot of improvement to achieve. It had been kept woefully undeveloped previously, especially so beginning with the cultural revolution starting in 1966. Imagine what 1.4 billion well educated people could do if the leash was loosened today.

Max The Magnificent
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Re: Code of Ethics for Engineers
Max The Magnificent   6/6/2014 4:45:02 PM
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@junko: Where do you think we can still find "the code of ethics" for engineers Nader showed to you?

I agree -- I would like to see that also.

 

Susan Rambo
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Re: Expectations vs reality
Susan Rambo   6/6/2014 4:41:21 PM
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Yes, I agree about D-Day anniversary and it is a big anniversary. I read the vets' recollections yesterday on New York Times. I tried to think of an angle to approach it but not until now did I realize: we could have made a list of all the techniques used that made the invasion successful that could not be used today because of technology. For instance: there could be no surprise attack. Don't you think?

You have to admit, China's economy has changed a lot in 25 years.

Bert22306
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Expectations vs reality
Bert22306   6/6/2014 4:16:55 PM
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My reaction to this Tiananmen Square anniversary is that it's not really being celebrated. Compare it, for instance, to the D-Day invasion 70th anniversary.

In that latter case, we say, look how that event changed the world. In the former, has anything changed? The Chinese government is still telling people what to do, what to think, and what they should be allowed to know. Or at least, trying their best to do so?

(A not unfair retort is our own government's witchhunt against Snowden.)

The MicroMan
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Engr Ethics
The MicroMan   6/6/2014 3:18:29 PM
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Actually, I'd argue that engineers are very ethical, almost inherently so, and I'm proud to be associated with the bunch.  Engineers seem to be self-motivated to improve on everything they touch (perhaps to a fault).  I have no concerns that any electronic equipment I use will harm me or do evil.  I know there are no trap doors built in to surprise me with a trojan horse or or secret outlet.  I know that nobody designed a bridge to fall down, a car to drive itself into a lake, or a rocket to disintergrate.  That's not to say bad decisions aren't made sometimes, possibly based on business issues, but I've never felt there was evil intent in any engineer's work.  This is all different from the Tiananmen Sq situation and certain other political issues (building bombs). 

Tom Mahon
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Tech and Tiananmen
Tom Mahon   6/6/2014 1:35:07 PM
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We shouldn't forget the role that fax machines played during those days.  Fax was state of the art in the late 80s, and served well to keep Chinese in China and in the diaspora in touch with each other and supporting each other.  A predecessor to social media today.

 

junko.yoshida
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Code of Ethics for Engineers
junko.yoshida   6/6/2014 1:15:50 PM
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Rick, thank you so much for your contribution. Where do you think we can still find "the code of ethics" for engineers Nader showed to you?

DougInRB
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Re: Won the battle lost the war
DougInRB   6/6/2014 12:56:41 PM
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The war goes on.  A friend of mine just returned from China.  He could not access his gmail account this past week due to the anniversary of Tiananmen square.

Much of Google continues to be blocked in China.

Sad.

KevinCBaxter
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Won the battle lost the war
KevinCBaxter   6/6/2014 12:37:15 PM
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The biggest problem is that the Chinese government has recently succeeded in their quest to hide the facts from their own people, even if we know all about it. Chinese citizens that were of the age of rebellion during Tiananmen Square know the facts very well, but the present generation of 20ish year old Chinese have never heard of it, the thousands killed  by the government have been perfectly erased from their history books. 

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